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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Modern and Classical Languages

Kevin Larsen, Department Chair
231 Hoyt Hall
Phone: (307) 766-4177, FAX: (307) 766-2727
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/modlang

Professors

PHILIP HOLT, B.A. St. John's College 1969; Ph.D Stanford University 1976; Professor of Classics 2005, 1993, 1987.
KEVIN S. LARSEN, B.A. Brigham Young University 1976; M.A. 1978; A.M. Harvard University 1979; Ph.D. 1983; Professor of Spanish 1998, 1989.
HANNELORE MUNDT, Staatsexamen, Rheinisch-Westfalische Technische Hochschule Aachen 1977; Ph.D. University of California-Irvine 1984; Professor of German 2004, 1998, 1996.

Associate Professors

KHAMA-BASSILI TOLO, G3: Gradué en Pédagogie Appliquée, Option: Francais-Linguistique Africaine, Université Nationale du Zaire 1976; L2: Licencié en Pédagogie Appliquée, Option: Francais, 1978; M.A. Vanderbilt University 1986; Ph.D. 1989; Associate Professor of French 1996, 1990.

Assistant Professors

EKATERINA ALEXANDROVA, B.A. Saint Jousephs University 2003; M.A. Dartmouth College 2004; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania 2012; Assistant Professor of French 2012.
IRENE CHECA-GARCIA, B.A. University of Granada 1997; M.A. Linguistics University of Granada 2000; Ph.D. Universidad de Alemeriá 2004; Assistant Professor of Spanish 2012.
CONXITA DOMÈNECH, B.A. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 1990; M.A. 1992; M.A. University of Colorado Boulder 2006; Ph.D. 2010; Assistant Professor of Spanish 2011.
REBECCA E. STEELE, B.A. Leibnitz-Academie 2001; M.A. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 2008; Ph.D. 2009; Assistant Professor of German 2012, 2009. 

Senior Professional Lecturer

JOSEPH KRAFCZIK, B.A. University of Wyoming 1983; M.A. University of Michigan 1986; Associate Lecturer in Russian 2005, 1988.

Academic Professional Lecturers

PETRA HEINZ, M.A. Ludwig-Maximilian-Unviersitaet 1990; Assistant Academic Professonal Lecturer in ESL 2013.
JENNIFER LAVANCHY,
B.A. University of Wyoming 2004; M.A. 2006, 2008; Academic Professional Lecturer in Spanish 2011.
LAURA DE LOZIER, B.A. Beloit College 1990; M.A. University of Wisconsin 1992; Ph.D. 2002; Associate Academic Professional Lecturer in Latin 2006.
MARK W. PERSON, B.A. University of Wyoming 1983; M.A. 1986; Associate Academic Professional Lecturer in German 2012.
BÉNÉDICTE SOHIER, B.A. Stephen F. Austin State University 2006; M.A. Indiana University Bloomington 2008; Academic Professional Lecturer in French 2012, 2009.
YAN ZHANG, B.A. Harbin Institute of Technology 2000; M.A. Heilongjiang Provincial Academy of Social Sciences 2002; Associate Academic Professional Lecturer in Chinese 2011, 2006.

Temporary Lecturers

Angela Camino, Sonia Rodriguez-Hicks, Xuan-Xabier Huynh, Noah Miles, Mary Katherine Scott, Adriana Perez-Smith, Anna Shur

Professors Emeriti

M. Ian Adams, Lewis Bagby, Lowell A. Bangerter, Klaus D. Hanson, Francis S. Heck, Walter G. Langlois, Carlos Mellizo-Cuadrado, Jean-Louis G. Picherit, Pavel Sigalov, Duane Rhoades

Modern and Classical Languages

The Modern and Classical Languages department offers work leading to the B.A. degree with majors in French, German, Russian and Spanish, or concentrations for the B.A. in humanities/fine arts. A minor is offered in Latin and Japanese area studies. The M.A. is available in French, German and Spanish. Courses are also offered in literature in translation.

Foreign Language Requirements

All candidates for the B.A. and B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences are required to complete the equivalent of 8 semester hours of work in a single modern or classical language. Normally this requirement is satisfied by completing courses 1010 and 1020 with a letter grade of C or better in a single language, but completion of 1020 with a grade of C or better also satisfies the requirement. There are also other ways to satisfy the requirement: (1) a more advanced language course with a grade of C or better also constitutes the completion of the language requirement (for a list of applicable courses contact the department); (2) students with prior exposure to the language may be granted college credit after taking a written examination administered by the department; students must take this examination before completing registration for a language course (for regulations governing credit by examination, refer to Credit Available to Undergraduate Students in this bulletin); (3) an advanced placement, AP, examination in the language with a score of 4 or higher satisfies the language requirement, as do CLEP scores (see section on Credit by Examination on the department website).

Students who do not wish college credit for previous high school language study should register in classes appropriate to their level of training. Those who have had two years of a foreign language in high school normally enter 1020 of that language, while those who have had three or more years of such study should take the placement examination to determine the course in which they should enroll and to avail themselves of the opportunity to receive credit by examination. Students in doubt about their ability are advised to take the placement examination. Students who have completed their language requirement can enroll for additional language courses of their choice, something strongly advised for those who wish to reach adequate levels of proficiency in the language or wish to study abroad. Check the bulletin or website for special sections targeted for students with varied experiences in the language.

Undergraduate Major

A language major usually requires 30 semester hours of work in a single language beyond 2030. To include a language option in the humanities/fine arts interdisciplinary program, students must complete at least 12 hours above the 2030 level.

Required courses for the major in French are 2040, 2130 or 3110, 2140, 3005, 3050, 3060, 4100, 4110, plus 6 hours of electives at the 4000-level.

Required courses for the major in German are 2040, 2140, 3050, 4100 and 4110, plus 15 hours of electives in German at the upper-level.

German in-residency requirement: German majors need to take 3 of the following 6 courses to meet the in-residency requirement: GERM 4100, 4110, 4145, 4240, 4230, 4265.

Required courses for the major in Russian are RUSS 2040, 2140, 3050, 3060, 4070, 4080 and 12 hours of electives in Russian at the 3000-level or above.

Spanish offers two major tracks: (1) literature-language requires 2040, 2140, 3050, 3100, 3120, plus electives (for a total of 30 credit hours minimum); (2) language-linguistics requires 2040, 2140, 3050, 3060, 4070, 4080, 4090, LANG 4750 and strongly recommends SPAN 3100, 3120, ANTH 2200, plus electives (for a total of 33 credit hours minimum).

The humanities/fine art majors should have 2040, 2140 and 3050 as part of their language option.

Prospective B.A. language majors should seek help from their advisers to work out a coordinated program of study. An additional area of concentration (e.g., a second foreign language, English, fine arts, philosophy, history, science or social science) is strongly recommended.

Students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences may obtain teaching certification by electing certain courses in the College of Education; they should consult the language department during their sophomore year in order to make the necessary selection.

Minor

In general, students desiring to complete a minor in a foreign language will be required to complete a program of 18 semester hours above 2030. For individual languages, contact the department for further details or check the departmental web site.

Native Language Credit

Students are not allowed university credit for language courses in their native language below the 4000 level, but may receive credit for literature courses below that level.

Study Abroad

There are many opportunities for students to study abroad and students are encouraged to do so.

Suggested Curriculum for B.A. in a Foreign Language

(for students with no prior background in the language)

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

Language 1010

4

Freshman Year: Spring
Language 1020

4

Sophomore Year: Fall
Language 2030

4

Sophomore Year: Spring
Language 2040

3

Language 2140

3

Junior Year: Fall
Language 3050

3

Language 3000-4000 level

3

Junior Year: Spring
Language 3060

3

Language 3000-4000 level

6

Senior Year: Fall
Language 4000-5000 level

6

Senior Year: Spring
Language 4000-5000 level

6

Graduate Study

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers programs leading to the master of arts degree with majors in French, German, and Spanish under Plan A and Plan B.

Undergraduates contemplating advanced work in all fields should remember that many graduate schools require a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Accordingly, they should plan to begin study in a foreign language early in their undergraduate years so that their progress toward an advanced degree will not be delayed later.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program in a specific language is open to students who have completed an undergraduate major, or the equivalent, in the same subject and who meet the minimum requirements set forth in this Catalog.

Students entering the graduate program from other institutions may be required to make up visible deficiencies in areas covered by required courses in this department's undergraduate programs.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Degree requirements are based on the university minimum requirements.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission to the graduate program in a specific language is open to students who have completed an undergraduate major, or the equivalent, in the same subject and who meet the minimum requirements set forth in this Catalog.

Students entering the graduate program from other institutions may be required to make up visible deficiencies in areas covered by required courses in this department's undergraduate programs. Program Specific Degree Requirements

Degree requirements are based on the university minimum requirements.

Undergraduates contemplating advanced work in all fields should remember that many graduate schools require a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. Accordingly, they should plan to begin study in a foreign language early in their undergraduate years so that their progress toward an advanced degree will not be delayed later.


Chinese (CHIN) Courses

Classics (CLAS) Courses

French (FREN) Courses

German (GERM) Courses

Greek (GRK) Courses

Japanese (JAPN) Courses

Language (LANG) Courses

Latin (LATN) Courses

Russian (RUSS) Courses

Spanish (SPAN) Courses



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