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University Catalog

Department of Zoology and Physiology

Merav Ben-David, Department Head
114 Aven Nelson
Phone: (307) 766-4207, FAX: (307) 766-5625
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/Zoology

Professors

MERAV BEN-DAVID, B.S. Tel Aviv University 1984; M.S. 1988; Ph.D. University of Alaska 1996; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2010, 2000.
CRAIG W. BENKMAN, B.A. University of California at Berkeley 1978; M.S. Northern Arizona Sate University 1981; Ph.D. State University of New York at Albany 1985; Robert Berry Professor of Ecology, Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2004.
CARLOS MARTINEZ del RIO, B.Sc. Universidad National de Mexico 1984; Ph.D. University of Florida 1990; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2004, 2000.
DAVID B. MCDONALD, A.B. Harvard College 1973; Ph.D. University of Arizona 1987; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2010, 1996.
FRANK J. RAHEL, B.A. Kenyon College 1974; M.S. University of Wisconsin 1977; Ph.D. 1982; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 1998, 1985.
ROBERT S. SEVILLE, B.S. San Diego State University 1981; M.S. University of Wyoming 1987; Ph.D. 1992; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2011, 1995.
QIAN-QUAN SUN, B.Sc. Shandong Normal University 1990; M.S. 1993; Ph.D. St. Andrews University 1998; Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2016, 2004.

Associate Professors

MATTHEW D. CARLING, B.S. University of Michigan 1997; M.S. University of Idaho 2002; Ph.D. Louisiana State University 2008; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2017, 2011.
ANNA D. CHALFOUN,
B.A. Smith College 1995; M.S. University of Missouri-Columbia 2000; Ph.D. University of Montana-Missoula 2006; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2016, 2011.
BRIAN D. CHERRINGTON,
B.A. Washington University 1996; M.S. Colorado State University 2001; Ph.D. 2005; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2017, 2011.
MICHAEL E. DILLON,
B.S. University of Texas, Austin 1998; Ph.D. University of Washington 2005; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2015, 2009.
JACOB R. GOHEEN,
B.S. Kansas State University 1998; M.S. Purdue University 2002; Ph.D. University of New Mexico 2006; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2015, 2010.
AMY C. KRIST,
B.A. State University of New York at Potsdam 1991; Ph.D. Indiana University 1998; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2017, 2004.
MATTHEW J. KAUFFMAN,
B.A. University of Oregon 1992; Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz 2003; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2014, 2006.
AMY M. NAVRATIL,
B.S. Colorado State University 1999; Ph.D. 2005; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2019, 2011.
JONATHAN F. PRATHER,
B.S. University of Virginia 1995; Ph.D. Emory University 2001; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2015, 2009.
KARA PRATT, B.A.S. University of Delaware; Ph.D. Brandeis University 2004; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2017, 2011.
ANNIKA W. WALTERS, B.A. Princeton University 2002; M.S. Yale University 2006; Ph.D. 2009; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2019, 2011.

Assistant Professors

SARAH BENSON-AMRAM, B.A. Cornell University 2001; Ph.D. Dual Degree Michigan State University 2011; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2014.
SARAH M. COLLINS, B.A. Lewis & Clark College 2007; Ph.D. Cornell University 2015; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2018.
YUN LI, B.S. University of Science and Technology of Chine 1996; M.S. 1998; Ph.D. University of Texas Health Center at San Antonio 2003; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2018.
JEROD A. MERKLE, B.S. University of Arizona 2006; M.S. University of Montana 2011; Ph.D. Univesité Laval 2014; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2018.
STEPHEN W. SANTORO, B.S. University of Wyoming 1994; Ph.D. Scripps Research Institute 1999; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2014.
COREY E. TARWATER, B.S. University of California, Davis 1999; M.S. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 2006; Ph.D. 2010; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2015.
W.D. (TREY) TODD, B.S. Baylor University 2005; M.A. University of Iowa 2009; Ph.D. 2012; Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology 2019.

Senior Academic Professional Research Scientist

ZHAOJIE ZHANG, B.S. Shandong University 1985; M.S. 1988; Ph.D. University of Oklahoma 1999; Director, Microscopy Core Facility, University of Wyoming 2006, 2004; Senior Academic Professional /Research Scientist 2012.

Assistant Academic Professional Research Scientist

JONATHAN PATRICK KELLEY, A.B. Harvard 2001; Ph.D. University of California, Davis 2012; Assistant Research Scientist in Zoology and Physiology 2018.

Professors Emeritus

Harold L. Bergman, Steven W. Buskirk, Francis W. Flynn, Zoltan M. Fuzessery, Robert P. George, William A. Gern, Robert O. Hall, Henry J. Harlow, Wayne A. Hubert, Robert M. Kitchin, J.A. Lillegraven, Frederick G. Lindzey, James R. Lovvorn, Graham Mitchell, James D. Rose, Joan Smith-Sonneborn

Academic Professional Lecturer Emeritus

Jane Beiswenger

Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Unit Leader: Matthew W. Kauffman

Assistant Unit Leader for Fisheries: Annika W. Walters

Assistant Unit Leader for Wildlife: Anna D. Chalfoun

Zoology and Physiology

The department of Zoology and Physiology offers a variety of courses in the biological sciences that encompass many aspects of animal form, function, and biology.

Whether you are interested in the intricacies of cell biology or the complexities of ecosystem functioning and whether you want to become a wildlife biologist or a physician, we offer a major that will suit your needs. Students can choose from four undergraduate degrees: biology, physiology, wildlife and fisheries biology and management, or zoology. Course requirements for each degree are detailed on our web site: www.uwyo.edu/zoology.

Undergraduate Degrees

Physiology Major

Physiology is the study of how animals work: how they breathe, feed, interact with their environment, and carry out many other activities and functions. Physiology is the knowledge that the health sciences are built on and so is especially important for students who may be thinking of becoming medical practitioners, veterinarians or health care professionals.

All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Foundation Courses
MATH 1400 and MATH 1450, or MATH 1450
(MATH 1450 may be substituted for
MATH 1400 and MATH 1405)
MATH 2200
STAT 2050 or 2070
CHEM 1020 and CHEM 1030
Two additional CHEM courses: CHEM 2230 or 2300
or 2420 or 2440 or 3020 or 3550 or 4050 or 4230
or 4400 or MOLB 3610*  
PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1120
LIFE 1010 and LIFE 3050
LIFE 2022 or MICR/MOLB 2021

 

*MOLB 3610 may be used as a CHEM elective, but cannot also count as a Core Elective

Physiology Core Required Courses
ZOO 3115, ZOO 4125,
and ZOO 4100 and 4101 (or approved USP C3 substitute)
Physiology Core Electives
A minimum of 10 of the 18 Physiology Core Elective credits
must be exclusive to the PHSO major. Choose a total of 18 credits from:
ANSC 4120 or 4260 or ANTH 4210 or 4230 or KIN 3021
or 3038 or 3042 or 4042 or LIFE 3600 or MOLB 3610 or 4100
or 4400 or 4670 or NEUR 4295 or 5100 or 5295 or 5685 or 5887
PATB 4130 or 4140 or 4400 or 4710
PHCY 3450 or PSYC 3250 or 4040 or 4080 or 4250 or
SOC 3550 or 4160 or ZOO 3010 or 4110 or 4280 or
4340 or 4670 or 4735 or 5100 or 5685 or SPPA 3265 or CHEM 3550**

**cannot count towards PHSO electives if used as a CHEM requirement in the Foundational Courses

At the end of this program students will have a thorough knowledge of physiology, will be well prepared to enter health sciences or graduate education, and will have a range of skills attractive to employers.

Wildlife and Fisheries Biology and Management Major

Wildlife and Fisheries Biology and Management is a professional degree designed to prepare students for state, federal, and other positions in resource management and conservation biology. The degree provides students with knowledge of the natural world, understanding of processes governing dynamics of wildlife and fish populations, as well as an appreciation of human-mediated effects on wildlife and fish populations. A student graduating with this degree will be familiar with the theory of resource management as well as with methods used to determine population status, habitat quality, and conservation. In Wyoming the abundance of wild animals and pristine habitats provide a unique natural laboratory for studying the responses of wildlife and fish populations to changing climates and habitats.

Foundation Courses
MATH 1400 and MATH 1450, or MATH 1450
(MATH 1450 may be substituted for
MATH 1400 and MATH 1405)
MATH 2200 (may substitute MATH 2350)
STAT 2050 or 2070
CHEM 1020 and CHEM 1030
Physical Science (GEOL 1100, PHYS 1110, or SOIL 2010)
COSC 1200 or approved Data Sciences course
LIFE 1010 and LIFE 2022
Core Required Courses
LIFE 3050, LIFE 3400, LIFE 3410, ZOO 2450,
ZOO 4190, ZOO 4400, ZOO 4970, and
ZOO 4100 and 4101 (or approved USP C3 substitute)
Complete Terrestrial OR Aquatic Option
TERRESTRIAL OPTION
BOT 4700, ZOO 4300, plus 14 credits restricted electives from:
ZOO 3600 or 4235 or 4310 or 4330 or 4350 or 4370 or 4380
or 4415 or 4420 or 4430 or 4440 or 4540 or BOT 0000:5999
or ENR 0000:5999 or SOC 3950 or REWM 0000:5999
or CHEM 2230 or AGEC 3750 or LIFE 2023
AQUATIC OPTION
ZOO 4330, ZOO 4440, ZOO 4430, please 15 credits restricted electives from:
ZOO 3600 or 4235 or 4300 or 4310 or 4350 or 4370 or 4380 or 4415 or 4420
or 4540 or CHEM 2230 or BOT 0000:5999 or REWM 0000:5999 or ENR 0000:5999
or SOC 3950 or AGEC 3750 or LIFE 2023

A student graduating with a degree in WFBM will have comprehensive knowledge of wildlife and fisheries biology and management, will have earned a degree that is compatible with the requirements for professional certification with the American Fisheries Society or the Wildlife Society, and will have a range of knowledge and skills that are valuable to potential employers.

Zoology Major

Zoology is the study of animals: their structure, physiology, development and evolution. One of the enduring fascinations of zoology is that we can learn so much about ourselves and our environment by studying what our fellow creatures do.

Foundation Courses
MATH 1400 and MATH 1450, or MATH 1450
(MATH 1450 may be substituted for
MATH 1400 and MATH 1405)
MATH 2200
STAT 2050 or 2070
CHEM 1020 and CHEM 1030
CHEM 2230 or 2420 or 2440 or 3020 or 3550
or 4050 or 4230 or 4400
PHYS 1110 and PHYS 1120
LIFE 1010, LIFE 2022, LIFE 3050, LIFE 3400, and LIFE 3500
ZOO 4100 and 4101 (or approved USP C3 substitute)
Advanced Zoology course*
One of: ZOO 4330 or 4350 or 4370 or 4380 or 4540

*if more than one of the required courses is completed, additional courses can count towards the Zoology Approved Core Electives below.

Zoology Approved Core Electives
Choose a total of 18 credits from:
ZOO 3115 or 3600 or 4190 or 4235 or 4300 or 4310 or 4330
or 4340 or 4350 or 4370 or 4380 or 4540 or 4400 or 4415
or 4420 or 4430 or 4440 or 4735 or ANSC 3010 or 3100 or 3150
or MOLB 3000 or BOT 4235 or 4550 or 4664 or 4790 or GEOG 3150
or 3480 or ENTO 4300 or 4682 or 4678 or 4684 or
PATB 4170 or 4310 or 4360 or 4710

At the end of this program students will have a comprehensive knowledge of zoology, will be well prepared for graduate education, and will be equipped to enter any of the many employment opportunities that are available.

Learning Outcomes for Undergraduates

The learning outcomes that direct the teaching of the department's degrees and which we expect our graduates to have acquired are:

  • Competence in basic sciences;
  • Competence in the content of the specific courses that constitute the principal knowledge of the degree;
  • Ability to comprehend, analyze, and interpret biological data where appropriate; and
  • Ability to synthesize information from the biological literature, and communicate it effectively in writing or orally.

Undergraduate Minor

Minors in human and animal physiology, wildlife fisheries biology management, neuroscience, and zoology are offered. Contact the department for further information.

Human and Animal Physiology Minor

Requirements for the minor in human and animal physiology (AHPY) include a minimum of 18 credit hours. Courses counted towards one minor may not be counted towards another. A grade of C or better is required in all courses.

Required Courses

  • ZOO 3115
  • AND at least one of these three*: ZOO 4125, ZOO 4190, PHCY 3450
  • AND at least three courses from the Electives list.

*if more than one of the three required courses is completed, additional courses can count towards Physiology Core elective courses requirement below.

Elective Courses

Physiology Core Electives. At least three courses from:

  • ANSC 4120 or 4260 or ANTH 4210 or 4230 or KIN 3021 or 3038 or 3042 or 4042 or LIFE 3600 or MOLB 3610 or 4100 or 4400 or 4670 or NEUR 4295 or 5100 or 5295 or 5685 or 5887
  • PATB 4130 or 4140 or 4400 or 4710
  • PSYC 3250 or 4040 or 4080 or 4250 or SOC 3550 or 4160 or ZOO 3010 or 4110 or 4280 or 4340 or 4670 or 4735 or 5100 or 5685 or SPPA 3265 or CHEM 3550

Wildlife Fisheries Biology Management Minor

Requirements for the minor in wildlife fisheries biology management (WFBM) include a total of 18-22 credit hours. Courses counted towards one minor may not be counted towards another. A grade of C or better is required in all courses.

Required Courses

  • 9 or 11 credit hours required from the following: LIFE 3400, ZOO 2450, and ONE (1) course from ZOO 4300 or ZOO 4310

Elective Courses

  • Select three (3) of the following courses, one of which must have a laboratory component: LIFE 3050, ZOO 3600, ZOO 4190, ZOO 4330, ZOO 4350, ZOO 4370, ZOO 4380, ZOO 4400, ZOO 4415, ZOO 4420, ZOO 4440, ZOO 4540

Zoology Minor

Requirements for the minor in zoology (ZOOL) include 17-20 credit hours. Courses counted towards one minor may not be counted towards another. A grade of C or better is required in all courses.

Required Course

  • LIFE 3050

Elective Courses

  • Select four (4) of the following courses, one of which must have a laboratory component: LIFE 3400, LIFE 3500, ZOO 3115, ZOO 3600, ZOO 4190, ZOO 4235, ZOO 4330, ZOO 4340, ZOO 4350, ZOO 4370, ZOO 4380, ZOO 4540, BOT 4235

Graduate Study

The Department of Zoology and Physiology offers programs leading to the master of science and the doctor of philosophy in zoology and physiology. We also participate in graduate programs through the Neuroscience Program and the Program in Ecology.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is open to all students who meet the minimum requirements set forth in the admissions section of this bulletin.

Research and teaching assistantships are available for graduate students working toward the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Applicants can apply for this financial assistance at the time they apply for admission to graduate standing. Applications must be completed by February 15 in order to be considered for the following academic year.

Information on how to apply to the graduate program in the Department of Zoology and Physiology is detailed on our web site. Begin by identifying a faculty member in our department whose research interests are similar to yours. We will only consider an application if a faculty member has indicated a willingness to serve as the student's adviser. After finding a potential adviser, e-mail a completed departmental application form, a copy of your curriculum vitae, copies of college transcripts, and recommendation letters to him or her. Our graduate admissions committee will review all applications and make decisions on admission based on the availability of funding and a commitment from a faculty member to serve as the adviser. Students recommended for admission will then be asked to fill out an application to the University of Wyoming and pay a non-refundable application fee.

Consult the web site, www.uwyo.edu/zoology, to find out about faculty research.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master's Program

Plan A (thesis)

Includes 26 hours of coursework and 4 hours of thesis research.

Applicants should have at least 20 semester hours of undergraduate work in zoology, physiology, or other areas of the biosciences and have completed introductory courses in mathematics, chemistry, and in at least one other natural or physical science. Early in the second semester the student must file a program of study with the university and have a graduate committee appointed. Plan A candidates shall orally defend the thesis before the graduate committee.

All M.S. candidates will be required to complete credit in two graduate seminars. A student may enroll in more than one of these required seminars during one semester or academic year.

After two semesters in the department, a Plan A master's candidate may request permission from the department's graduate advisory board to proceed directly to the Ph.D. degree; however, such a bypass is granted only by the department head after considering recommendations from the graduate advisory board.

Zoology and physiology may be used as a field by a candidate working for the interdisciplinary master of science in natural science in the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Education.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Includes 30 hours of coursework.

The program for the Plan B is established by the student and a faculty adviser and must be approved by the department head during the student's second semester or summer session.

The graduate committee will require the candidate to take a written examination. An oral examination may also be required. The final examination is comprehensive, covering all areas of zoology, but emphasizing one major area.

Doctoral Program

This is a 72 hour program.

A Ph.D. applicant must have 20 hours of undergraduate work in zoology, physiology, or other areas of biology and also have completed substantial undergraduate work in other sciences. Under exceptional circumstances, a student with an undergraduate major in a scientific discipline other than biology may be admitted. After the Ph.D. student has completed two semesters of graduate work, s/he must be approved for continued work toward the doctorate by the graduate advisory board. This board can reconsider a candidate thereafter if it so desires.

A graduate committee shall be appointed for the individual student no later than the third semester. After consultation with the student, this committee will prescribe special requirements (courses, minors, research tools, etc.) that must be fulfilled. At this time, the graduate committee shall consult with the candidate on the proposed research and shall identify the subject matter areas to be included in the preliminary examination. The preliminary examination will consist of a written research proposal, its oral defense, and a written and oral preliminary examination. When training outside zoology and physiology is specified by the committee, certification of satisfactory completion of the requirement will be made by the appropriate department.

In addition to the general university requirements for the Ph.D. degree, the department requires the following:

The coursework program should include work in a discipline outside the department, generally in the sense of a minor, to be identified in consultation with the graduate committee.

The preliminary examination consisting of written and oral portions should be taken no later than midterm of the fourth semester in residence. The graduate committee will certify satisfactory performance for the preliminary examination.

The dissertation must be received by each member of the graduate committee three weeks before the final dissertation seminar. As oral defense of the dissertation, the candidate will deliver a formal 50 minute seminar on original research from the dissertation. The seminar will be followed by an examination by the graduate committee.

Some time during their degree program, all Ph.D. candidates will be required to complete credit in three graduate seminars. A student may enroll in more than one of these required seminars during one semester or academic year.

All candidates for the Ph.D. degree shall be required to teach for one semester during their program.

The dissertation may be written in a format suitable for publication in a journal and the usual extensive literature review, description of study sites, technical details, raw data, supporting figures, charts, and photographs should be included in a well-organized appendix. (See also format requirements by the university.)

Learning Outcomes for M.S. Students

  1. Comprehend and synthesize advanced knowledge in a specific area of biology.
  2. College and analyze data to address a research question.
  3. Summarize research findings and communicate them effectively in writing and orally.

Learning Outcomes for Doctoral Students

  1. Comprehend and synthesize advanced knowledge in a specific area of biology.
  2. Develop a research project which constitutes a substantial and original contribution to the field of study.
  3. Summarize research findings and communicate them effectively in writing and orally.

Zoology (ZOO) Courses

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