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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Professional Studies

332 Education Building, 766‑2366
and
316 Education Building, 766-5649
FAX: (307) 766-5638
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/profstudies

Department Head: Mary Alice Bruce 

The Department of Professional Studies includes the following program areas:  Adult and Post-Secondary Education, Counseling, Leadership, Research, Instructional Technology and Special Education.

Professors

MARTIN AGRAN, B.A. City College of New York 1969; M.A. University of Rochester 1971; M.S. Oregon College of Education 1974; Ph.D. University of Illinois 1982; Professor of Special Education 2005.
MARY ALICE BRUCE, B.S. Purdue University 1971; M.S. Iowa State University 1989; Ph.D. 1991; Professor of Counselor Education 2007, 1991.
JOHN STELLERN, B.A. University of California Berkeley 1955; M.A. California State University Los Angeles 1961; Ed.D. University of Northern Colorado 1966; Professor of Special Education 1973, 1969.
SUZANNE YOUNG, B.S. Metropolitan State College 1978; M.S. University of Northern Colorado 1990; Ph.D. 1995; Professor of Educational Research 2007, 1996.

Associate Professors

KENT W. BECKER, B.S. Oklahoma State University 1982; M.A. University of Northern Colorado 1990; Ed.D. 1994; Associate Professor of Counselor Education 2003, 1998.
DORIS BOLLIGER, B.S. Park University 1991; M.A. Bowie State University 1995; Ed.D. University of West Florida 2002; Associate Professor of Instructional Technology 2012.
HEATHER DUNCAN, B.Sc. University of Aberdeen, Scotland 1975; M.Ed. Brandon University, MB 2000; Ph.D. University of Saskatchewan, SK 2004; Associate Professor of Educational Leadership 2011, 2005.
CLIFFORD P. HARBOUR, B.A. Rhode Island College 1978; J.D. Ohio Northern University 1981; M.A. Duke University 1987; Ed.D. North Caroina State University 2000; Associate Professor of Adult Education 2008.
DEBORAH MCGRIFF, B.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln 1976; M.S.W. University of Nebraska-Omaha 1981; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 1999; Associate Professor of Coun-selor Education 2009, 2002.
MICHAEL M. MORGAN, B.S. Brigham Young University 1993; M.S. Auburn University 1995; Ph.D. Purdue University 2003; Associate Professor of Counselor Education 2011, 2003.
QI SUN, B.A. Harbin Teacher College 1984; M.Ed. Beijing Normal University 1990; Ed.D. Northern Illinois University 2001; Associate Professor of Adult Education 2009, 2002.
DOROTHY JEAN YOCOM, B.A. Whitworth College 1978; M.S. University of Oregon 1980; Ph.D. Oregon State University 1991; Associate Professor of Special Education 1997, 1991.

Assistant Professors

KARA L. CARNES-HOLT, B.A. East Texas Baptist University 2000; M.S. Ed. Baylor University 2003; Ph.D. University of North Texas 2010; Assistant Professor of Counselor Education 2012, 2010.
COURTNEY McKIM, B.S. Boise State University 2006; Ph.D. University of Nebraska 2011; Assistant Professor of Educational Research 2011.
DAVID HVIDSTON, B.S.Ed. University of North Dakota 1979; M.A. University of Wyoming 1988; Ed.D. 2002; Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership 2011.
BRET G. RANGE, B.S. Missouri State University 1996; M.S. 1999; Ed.S. 2004; Ed.D. University of Arkansas 2009; Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership 2012, 2010.
CRAIG SHEPHERD, B.S. Brigham Young University 2002; Ph.D. University of Georgia 2008; Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology 2012, 2008.
JANE WARREN, B.A. University of Wyoming 1974; M.A. 1979; Ph.D. 1987; Assistant Professor of Counselor Education 2012, 2007.

Senior Lecturers

KAY COWIE, B.S. Northern State University 1968; M.S. 1970; Senior Lecturer 2009, 1997.
STEVEN AAGARD, B.S. University of Wyoming 1989; M.A. Washington State University 1991; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2006; Senior Lecturer 2011, 2005.

Program Areas

Counseling

Counselor education curricula experiences concentrate on the integration of helping skills, theory and practice. The programs utilize a personalized, developmentally oriented focus and prepare professional counselors for entry into school, mental health, and higher education settings.

The undergraduate counseling courses are designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • enhance self-awareness
  • facilitate effective relationship skills
  • increase leadership knowledge and skills
  • assist learners in maximizing their potential

Graduate Study

Counselor education offers a two-year (61-65 semester hours) master's degree program for practice in schools, colleges, universities, and community agencies. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the national accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation, has conferred accreditation to the following M.S. specializations in counseling: school counseling, and mental health counseling. The Ph.D. program in Counselor Education and Supervision is also CACREP accredited. Some courses are offered for undergraduates interested in school counseling, group work, leadership, and student affairs work. Undergraduates interested in preparing for entry into graduate work in counseling are invited to consult with program faculty prior to graduation. Program information is available on the Web site.

Degrees Offered

M.S. in Counseling, Option: Mental Health Counseling

M.S. in Counseling, Option: School Counseling

Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision

Program Specific Admission Requirements

For master's applicants:

Summary of academic background

Professional resume

Self-statement

Three letters of recommendation

For doctoral applicants:

Professional resume

Self-statement

Program information form

Three letters of recommendation

Prior to full admission, all students are required to complete a background check.

Program Specific Graduate Assistantships

Assistantships are usually available for doctoral students. Master's students sometimes qualify for assistantships. Please contact the program at (307) 766-2366 for assistantship opportunities, and see department web site.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master's Programs

Professional Master's Program

Minimum requirements: same for all options

61 hours of graduate credit to include 40 hours of core courses and 21 hours of graduate coursework specific to chosen option

Culminating internship activity guided by faculty advisor

Students complete the CAPP program in lieu of a program of study

Program Requirements

Core Courses

Hours

CNSL 5060 Counseling Ethics and Professional Issues

3

CNSL 5110 Group Procedures

3

CNSL 5140 Counseling and Addictions

3

CNSL 5170 Career Across the Lifespan

3

CNSL 5175 Human Growth and Development

3

CNSL 5180 Assessment in Counseling

3

CNSL 5200 Couples & Family Theory & Application

3

CNSL 5210 Group Experience

1

CNSL 5310 Pre-Practicum in Counseling

3

CNSL 5320 Practicum in Counseling

3

CNSL 5330 Counseling Children and Adolescents

3

CNSL 5340 Play Therapy

3

CNSL 5350 Multicultural Counseling

3

EDRE 5610 Advanced Practice in Group and Family Counseling

3

CNSL 5640 Diagnosis, Psychopathology, & Psychopharmacology

3

CNSL 5650 Counseling Theories

3

EDRE 5530 Introduction to Research 3

Core Subtotal

49

School Counseling

Hours

CNSL 5120 School Counseling Strategies and Techniques

3

CNSL 5125 School Counseling II

3

CNSL 5580 Supervised Internship

6

Subtotal

12

Mental Health Counseling 

Hours

CNSL 5130 Mental Health Counseling

3

CNSL 5150 Mental Health Counseling II

3

CNSL 5580 Supervised Internship

6

Subtotal

12

Minimum Total Credit Hours

61

Program Core Requirements

Core Courses

Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Supervision

Doctoral students are required to have completed a minimum of a 48-hour Master's degree from a program of study equivalent to a CACREP accredited Masters program in Counselor Education. These requirements are based upon the 2009 CACREP Standards.

Learning Outcome Areas

Advanced Foundations

Ph.D. students with a 48-hour CACREP equivalent Master's degree are required to complete 12 semester hours of courses beyond their Master's preparation (in consultation with their adviser and committee). Ph.D. students with a 60-hour CACREP equivalent Master's program can petition up to 12 hours of their Master's coursework to fulfill this requirement.

Counseling and Supervision

Hours

CNSL 5860 Doctorate Practicum in Counseling

6

CNSL 5865 Supervision Theory

3

CNSL 5875 Doctorate Practicum in Supervision

3

Teaching Leadership and Advocacy 

Hours

CNSL 5871 Doctoral Seminar I: Professional Identity and Ethics

3

CNSL 5872 Doctoral Seminar II: Diversity and Social Change

3

CNSL 5873 Doctoral Seminar III: Research, Assessment and Scholarship 3
CNSL 5874 Doctoral Seminar IV: Leadership, Consultation and Advocacy 3
CNSL 5900 Practicum in College Teaching 3
CNSL 5990 Supervised Internship 6

Research and Scholarship

12 credits chosen from the following (or equivalent) in consultation with major adviser and graduate committee.

Courses

Hours

EDRE 5600 Ed Res 1: Descriptive

3

EDRE 5610 Ed Res 2: Group Comp

3

EDRE 5620 Ed Res 3: Correlational Res

3

EDRE 5630 Ed Res 4: Multivariate Res

3

EDRE 5640 Intro to Qual. Research

3

Dissertation Hours
EDRE 5660 Dissertation/Thesis Prospectus Writing

3

PRST 5980 Dissertation Research

12

Total

72

 

Learner Outcomes

Master’s Degree in Counseling

At the completion of the Master’s degree in Counseling students will demonstrate the following learner outcomes:

  1. Professional Competence & Academic Preparation for Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC): Students will demonstrate academic preparation by developing and completing an approved program of study that meets the standards set forth by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
  2. Democratic Perspectives: Students will demonstrate development as a culturally competent, creative, skilled & ethical counselor. 
  3. Professional Identity: Students will develop a professional identity as a professional counselor including the areas of advocacy, leadership, social justice, and promoting caring communities.
  4. Academic & Professional Goals: Students will demonstrate a clear vision of their professional and academic goals.

Ph.D. in Counselor Education & Supervision

Doctoral students in Counselor Education & Supervision will demonstrate the following learner outcomes through the development of a professional e-portfolio (https://sites.google.com/site/phdeportfolio/Home) that is presented and reviewed on an annual basis.

  1. Academic & Professional Goals: Students will demonstrate a clear vision of their professional and academic goals and academic preparation by developing and completing an approved program of study that meets the standards set forth by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
  2. Professional Licensure: Students will obtain professional licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Wyoming and/or develop a plan to obtain licensure for the state in which they intend to relocate upon graduation.
  3. Democratic Perspectives: Students will demonstrate development as a culturally competent, creative, skilled & ethical counselor, supervisor and educator including the areas of advocacy, leadership, social justice, and promoting caring communities.
  4. Research & Scholarship: Students will develop a professional identity as an academic researcher by demonstrating a clear and active research agenda that includes a plan of action for professional presentations and manuscripts.
  5. Professional Development: Students will develop a clear and diligent plan to becoming a skilled counselor educator, including self-care.

 

Educational Adminstration

The Program

The Educational Administration program simultaneously serves the formal academic leadership development needs of persons aspiring to become K-12 leaders and leaders in adult education or post-secondary education institutions. The program responds to school boards, community college boards of trustees and state education agencies for close coordination and collaboration between K-12 and adult and post-secondary education. Thus, the programs prepare managers and leaders for K-12 education, post-secondary education and adult education. In the K-12 education setting, these managers and leaders include public and private school principals (including those at the assistant and associate level), district office personnel and district superintendents. In the post-secondary education and adult education settings, these managers and leaders include coordinators, directors, deans and executive leaders at community colleges and adult education organizations.


The program encompasses two graduate cognates:
Adult and Post-Secondary Education
K-12 Education Leadership

Educational Administration

This option offers the following graduate degrees in education: master of arts (M.A.) Adult and Post Secondary Education and doctor of education (Ed.D.), Adult and Post Secondary Education. The master's program requires 33 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree and is available online. The Ed.D. is the terminal professional degree in education designed for students who desire to improve their professional practice as educators. The Ed.D. requires a minimum of 77 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree. A bachelor's and master's degree is required of all students to be admitted to an Ed.D. program. Candidates may, with the approval of the faculty, transfer up to 30 semester hours from previous course work.

Adult and Post-Secondary Education

The domain or field of adult education is vast and varied, extending from self-directed learning (educational activities initiated and largely conducted by the individual himself or herself) to more formal educational opportunities sponsored by institutions and agencies (such as adult basic education, community colleges, university and local education centers). Within the adult education graduate program at UW, this focus is generally narrowed to educational endeavors sponsored by institutions and agencies and specifically designed for adult participants. Areas of study include the following:

  1. adult development and learning theories;
  2. leadership development in post secondary education institutions
  3. the social, historical, and international context of adult education;
  4. equity and access to continuing education opportunities for adults 

Graduate study in adult education addresses the challenges faced by institutions and agencies in the design and delivery of post secondary education and the preparation of educators to meet these challenges.

Career Options

Graduates of the program are employed specifically as faculty and administrators in community colleges and universities, human resource developers, adult literacy educators, military training specialists, training coordinators for government and social service agencies (such as the Department of Family Services, the Department of Labor, Family Planning Agencies, and the Eppson Center for Seniors), museum educators, adult learning consultants, and continuing professional educators in many fields including law, religion, nursing, and PK-12 teaching.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master's Program

Master of Arts in Education, Option: Adult and Post-Secondary Education Plan A (thesis)

Minimum of 33 hours of graduate credit

30 hours of program area core graduate hours

Approval of adviser

3 hours of EDRE 5530 Introduction to Educational Research

4 hours of thesis research

Plan B (non-thesis)

Minimum of 33 hours of graduate credit

 

30 hours of program area graduate hours

3 hours of EDRE 5530 Introduction to Educational Research

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Education, Option: Educational Administration, Cognate: Adult and Post- Secondary Education

The Ed.D. is the terminal professional degree in education designed for students who desire to improve their professional practice as educators. The Ed.D. is delivered through distance delivery system and requires a minimum of 80 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree, of which 36 hours must be taken in the student's chosen field, and 6 hours of dissertation. Candidates may, with the approval of the faculty, transfer up to 30 semester hours from previous graduate level coursework. A bachelor's degree and a master's degree are required of all students to be admitted to the Ed.D. program.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosopy (Ph.D.) in Education, Option: Educational Administration, Cognate: Adult and Post-Secondary Education

The Ph.D. is a terminal professional degree in education designed for students who want tow ork as a faculty member in higher educatin. The Ph.D. requires 81 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, of which 39 hours must be taken in the student’s chosen field including research courses, and 12 dissertation hours. Candidates may, with the approval of the faculty, transfer up to 30 semester hours from previous graduate level coursework. A bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree are required of all students to be admitted to the Ph.D. program.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Application deadlines and materials can be found on the department web page (http://www.uwyo.edu/profstudies/).

Program Specific Graduate Assistantships

Applicants interested in a Graduate Assistantship must submit a graduate assistantship application to the Professional Studies department office no later than February 1 for fall term admission (see above).

Learner Outcomes

  1. Academic Knowledge:  Students will demonstrate a deep understanding of knowledge related to the nature, function and scope of adult and continuing education; historical, philosophical and sociological foundations; adult learning and development; program processes including planning, delivery, and assessment/evaluation.
  2. Practical Competence: Students will demonstrate the ability to translate academic knowledge into expert practice related to their professional roles and specialized areas of interest.
  3. Reflective Inquiry: Students will demonstrate a reflective stance toward their professional practice and competence with diverse, critical and global perspectives and key tools of inquiry related to this field of study.
  4. Democratic Commitment: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between adult and continuing education and the complex process of democracy and a commitment to pursue this process with a focus on equal learning opportunities.
  5. Professional Engagement: Students will demonstrate intellectual engagement with adult and continuing education practices through creative and scholarly pursuits, participation in professional associations, and related activities. 

 

K-12 Educational Leadership

The curriculum in educational leadership is designed to prepare superintendents, principals, supervisors for public schools and leaders for organizations to perform duties of a specialized nature and to function effectively in a leadership capacity. The program provides sufficient breadth to give candidates for advanced degrees ample opportunity to develop essential competencies.

Degrees and Certificates Offered

Students who major in education with an option in educational administration and educational leadership track may choose one of the following certificate or degree programs: Principal Endorsement certificate program for eligibility of K-12 Principal endorsement (does not lead to a master's degree), Master of Arts in Education, Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy. Additional information may be found on the department webpage, (www.uwyo.edu/profstudies/).

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Candidates for a master's degree in education in educational leadership track, in addition to the admission requirements of the university, must complete a selection process which may include assessment in the following areas: teaching experience, a writing sample, and faculty interview.

Candidates for the doctor of education and the doctor of philosophy degree, in addition to the admission requirements of the university, must complete a selection process which may include the following prerequisites and assessment in the following areas: hold a master's degree, writing sample, and faculty interview.

Candidates for the University Graduate Certificate in School Principalship must file a university application with the Admissions Office, if not concurrently enrolled in a graduate program at the University of Wyoming. In addition, candidates must complete a selection process which may include assessment in the following areas: master's degree in an education related area from an accredited institution, writing sample, and faculty interview.

Candidates for the School District Superintendent University Graduate Certificate must file a university application with the Admissions office, if not concurrently enrolled in a graduate program at the University of Wyoming. In addition, candidates must have a master's degree and be asked to produce a writing sample and participate in an interview with faculty.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Principal Endorsement Certificate program

The endorsement/certificate is 21 credits which includes the four core classes, 3 credits each: EDAD 5010, Leadership for Curriculum Development; EDAD 5020, Leadership for School Organization; EDAD 5030, Leadership for School and Community Relations; EDAD 5040, Leadership for Instruction; EDAD 5580, Supervised Internship, 6 credits, and EDRE 5530 Intro to Research, 3 credits.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master's program

The master's is a 33 credit program which includes the four core classes, 3 credits each: EDAD 5010, Leadership for Curriculum Development; EDAD 5020, Leadership for School Organization; EDAD 5030, Leadership for School and Community Relations; EDAD 5040, Leadership for Instruction; EDAD 5580, Supervised Internship, 6 credits, EDAD 5050, Leadership for Democratic Schools, 3 credits; EDEX 5720, Special Education Law, 3 credits; EDAD 5150, Assessment, Accountability, and Student Learning, EDRE 5530 Intro to Research, 3 credits; and EDAD 5060, Capstone for Educational Leadership, 3 credits.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Educational Leadership Doctoral Program (Ed.D.)
(including Superintendent Certificate & Endorsement)

Core Educational Leadership Courses Hours
EDAD 5150 Assessment, Accountability, and Student Learning 3
or

EDCI 5600 Diversity 3
EDAD 5600 Educational Leader as Manager of Human Resources 3
EDAD 5650 Educational Leader as Communicator 3
EDAD 5700 Educational Leader for Instruction 3
or

EDCI 5720 Educational Leader as Change Agent 3
EDAD 5750 Educational Leader for the Board and Community 3
EDAD 5800 Educational Leader as Resource Manager 3
EDAD 5870 School Law 3
or
EDCI 5050 Leadership for Democratic Schools 3
Internship
EDAD 5580 Internship 2
Educational Research Courses 3
Introduction to Research (usually included in masters) 3
EDRE 5600 Educational Research 1: Descriptive Research 3
EDRE 5610 Educational Research 2: Group Comparision 3
EDRE 5620 Educational Research 3: Correlation 3
or
EDRE 5640 Intro to Qual. Research 3
Post Comprehensive Examination
EDRE 5660 Dissertation/Thesis Prospectus Writing 3
EDAD 5980 Dissertation Research 6


Program Specific Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program

Minimum of 79 total credits required in the following areas:

Core courses (minimum of 9 credits)

All PhD option areas require EDCI 5870, Intro to Doctoral Studies. In addition, doctoral students, with direction from their committees, will choose a minimum of two additional courses from the remaining five core courses:

PRST 5900 (Practicum in College Teaching)

EDCI 5600 (Diversity)

EDCI 5810 (Writing for Publication)

EDCI 5730 (Learning and Cognition)

EDAD 5720 (Leader as Change Agent)

EDRE 5660 (Dissertation/Thesis Prospectus Writing)

We also understand that students may meet the requirements for the core content in other ways, such as a master's degree in an area that emphasizes coursework in diversity or multi-cultural education. Committees may determine that the requirements for additional course(s) have been met. However, Introduction to Doctoral Studies may not be waived.

Cognate courses and advanced courses (minimum of 18 credits)

Advanced research courses (minimum of 12 credits)

Dissertation Hours

The required number of dissertation credits be a minimum of 12.

Preliminary exam (after coursework is completed): Guidelines determined by program, department, or committee

Program Outcomes: Written demonstration is required to show PhD outcomes are met (determined by program, department, or committee)

Dissertation (after preliminary exam): Guidelines determined by program, department, or committee

Notes:

These requirements for a PhD in Education are minimum requirements only. Students should check specific program options for additional requirements, including admissions criteria. Options approved prior to May 2009 may have different requirements.

Learner Outcomes

2011 ELCC District Level Standards

Standard 1.0: A district-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a shared district vision of learning through the collection and use of data to identify district goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and implement district plans to achieve district goals; promotion of continual and sustainable district improvement; and evaluation of district progress and revision of district plans supported by district stakeholders.
Standard 2.0: A district-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by sustaining a district culture conducive to collaboration, trust, and a personalized learning environment with high expectations for students; creating and evaluating a comprehensive, rigorous, and coherent curricular and instructional district program; developing and supervising the instructional and leadership capacity across the district; and promoting the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning within the district.
Standard 3.0: A district-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by ensuring the management of the district’s organization, operation, and resources through monitoring and evaluating district management and operational systems; efficiently using human, fiscal, and technological resources within the district; promoting district-level policies and procedures that protect the welfare and safety of students and staff across the district; developing district capacity for distributed leadership; and ensuring that district time focuses on high-quality instruction and student learning.
Standard 4.0: A district-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources for the district by collecting and analyzing information pertinent to improvement of the district’s educational environment; promoting an understanding, appreciation, and use of the community’s diverse cultural, social, and intellectual resources throughout the district; building and sustaining positive district relationships with families and caregivers; and cultivating productive district relationships with community partners.
Standard 5.0: A district-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner to ensure a district system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success by modeling district principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency, and ethical behavior as related to their roles within the district; safeguarding the values of democracy, equity, and diversity within the district; evaluating the potential moral and legal consequences of decision making in the district; and promoting social justice within the district to ensure individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling.

2011 ELCC Building Level Standards

Standard 1.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by collaboratively facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a shared school vision of learning through the collection and use of data to identify school goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and implement school plans to achieve school goals; promotion of continual and sustainable school improvement; and evaluation of school progress and revision of school plans supported by school-based stakeholders.
Standard 2.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning through collaboration, trust, and a personalized learning environment with high expectations for students; creating and evaluating a comprehensive, rigorous and coherent curricular and instructional school program; developing and supervising the instructional and leadership capacity of school staff; and promoting the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning within a school environment.
Standard 3.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by ensuring the management of the school organization, operation, and resources through monitoring and evaluating the school management and operational systems; efficiently using human, fiscal, and technological resources in a school environment; promoting and protecting the welfare and safety of school students and staff; developing school capacity for distributed leadership; and ensuring that teacher and organizational time is focused to support high-quality instruction and student learning.
Standard 4.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources on behalf of the school by collecting and analyzing information pertinent to improvement of the school’s educational environment; promoting an understanding, appreciation, and use of the diverse cultural, social, and intellectual resources within the school community; building and sustaining positive school relationships with families and caregivers; and cultivating productive school relationships with community partners.
Standard 5.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner to ensure a school system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success by modeling school principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency, and ethical behavior as related to their roles within the school; safeguarding the values of democracy, equity, and diversity within the school; evaluating the potential moral and legal consequences of decision making in the school; and promoting social justice within the school to ensure that individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling.
Standard 6.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context through advocating for school students, families, and caregivers; acting to influence local, district, state, and national decisions affecting student learning in a school environment; and anticipating and assessing emerging trends and initiatives in order to adapt school-based leadership strategies.
Standard 7.0: A building-level education leader applies knowledge that promotes the success of every student through a substantial and sustained educational leadership internship experience that has school-based field experiences and clinical internship practice within a school setting and is monitored by a qualified, on-site mentor.


Educational Research

The educational research faculty offer ten courses on a regular basis in educational research. These courses are open to graduate students throughout the college and the university. In addition, we offer two minors in educational research, one is qualitative research methods and one in quantitative research methods. Students currently enrolled in any UW master's or doctoral program are eligible for these minors. Both minors require students to complete 16 credit hours, a trial research project, and a co-teaching experience in educational research.


Instructional Technology

The curriculum in instructional technology is designed to assist professionals in effectively developing, implementing, and evaluating systems, tools, strategies, and environments that enhance learning. Graduates from the program secure employment in PK-12 classrooms; school media and technology centers, and school district administrative offices; public, corporate, and government centers and training agencies; college and university faculty and administrative positions; design and development labs; product support teams; and consulting firms.

Degrees and Certificates Offered

Students who major in education with an option in instructional technology may choose one of the following certificate or degree programs: Master of Science in Education (M.S.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) or Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Online Instruction Certificate program (does not lead to a master's degree). The program Web site (http://www.uwyo.edu/profstudies/) provides additional information.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Candidates for graduate degrees in education with an option in instructional technology must complete university admission requirements and submit additional application materials listed on the program Web site. A bachelor's degree is required for admittance to the M.S. program. A master's degree is required for Ed.D. and Ph.D. programs. Candidates for Ed.D. and Ph.D. programs may also participate in an interview during the selection process.

Candidates for the University Graduate Certificate in Online Instruction must file a university application with the Admissions Office, if not concurrently enrolled in a graduate program at the University of Wyoming. In addition, candidates must complete a selection process which may include assessment in the following areas: bachelor's degree in education or related area from an accredited institution, three letters of recommendation, and personal statement.

Program Specific Degree Requirement

Online Instruction Certificate Program

The certificate program consists of 12 credit hours of coursework. It is a post-baccalaureate, credit-bearing certificate program that includes four online courses: ITEC 5030, Introduction to Online Teaching; ITEC 5020, Technology and Distance Education; ITEC 5160, Introduction to Instructional Design (with an emphasis on online learning environments); and ITEC 5510, Instructional Telecommunications.

Program Specific Degree Requirement

Master of Science (M.S.) Program

The M.S. program gives students the foundations to design, develop, implement, and evaluate instructional resources and systems in professional learning environments. Students examine the history of technology-based training, instructional design, and distance education to understand current trends and procedures in the field. They apply this knowledge through the design and development of novel training solutions targeted to diverse professional settings (e.g., K-12 education, corporate and government centers, design and development labs, higher education).

Through these experiences, students learn how to identify gaps in desired and current practice, design training solutions to eliminate or bridge those gaps, develop tools and methods to implement solutions, and evaluate and revise methods for continued success. Emphasis is placed on instructional systems that use both face-to-face and distance delivery methods. Students can complete all of their coursework online with the exception of a campus visit for their final defense in the Capstone course.

The M.S. is a 36-credit hour program and includes the following requirements:

Plan A (Thesis)

  • Program core graduate credits: 24
  • Electives: 6 credits
  • EDRE 5530, Introduction to Research or
  • EDRE 5550, Action Research (3 credits)
  • PRST 5960, Thesis Research (3 credits)

Plan B (Non-Thesis)

  • Program core graduate credits: 24 credits
  • Electives: 6 credits
  • EDRE 5530, Introduction to Research or EDRE 5550, Action Research (3 credits)
  • ITEC 5090, Masters Capstone course (3 credits)

Program Specific Degree Requirement

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) Program

Residency requirement: Two spring residencies that last between 1-3 days on campus.

The Ed.D. is the terminal professional degree in education designed for students who desire to improve their professional practice as educators. The program moves beyond the foundations of distance education, instructional design, and technology integration to focus on advanced application and research. Students apply design, development, and evaluation principles to explore authentic challenges and develop real solutions in diverse settings (e.g., K-12 education, corporate and government centers, and higher education institutions). Through these experiences, students learn how to use advanced research methods to explore workplace problems, design and deliver solutions, and implement and evaluate change. Emphasis is placed on in-depth mentoring and collaboration, advanced research, development of real-world applications, and training solutions offered through both face-to-face and distance delivery platforms.

The Ed.D. program requires a minimum of 81 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree. Candidates may, with the approval of the committee, transfer up to 30 credit hours from previous graduate-level coursework in a closely related field. The program is delivered online with the exception of some advanced research courses and the spring residencies.

  • Program knowledge base: 48 credits
  • Research: 9 credits
  • Professional Writing: 6 credits
  • Electives: 12 credits
  • Dissertation: 6 credits

Program Specific Degree Requirement

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Program

Residency requirement: Four consecutive full-time semesters on campus.

The Ph.D. program prepares students for careers in academia. The program consists of: (1) systematic inquiry and research; (2) focused courses and professional experiences in education and related fields; and (3) teaching and other related activities tailored to individual career goals. Students work closely with an advisor and faculty committee to select courses, conduct research, and develop professional experiences.

Effective preparation for the Ph.D. stems from collaborative research and inquiry into topics of mutual interest by students and faculty. The program is structured around a cognitive apprenticeship model. Students spend a major portion of their program working with faculty members on shared research and scholarship.

The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of 81 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree and includes the following requirements:

  • Professional courses: 15 credits
  • Program knowledge base: 30 credits
  • Research: 15 credits
  • Electives: 9 credits
  • Dissertation: 12 credits

Candidates may, with the approval of the committee, transfer up to 30 credit hours from previous graduate-level coursework in a closely related field.

For additional information about specific required courses for graduate degrees in education with an option in instructional technology, please visit the program Web site.

Learner Outcomes

  1. Academic Knowledge:  Students will demonstrate a deep understanding of knowledge related to the nature, function and scope of instructional technology; historical, philosophical and sociological foundations; research; and program processes including planning, development, delivery, and assessment/evaluation.
  2. Design: Students will demonstrate how to determine organization and learner needs, specify conditions for learning, and conduct task analyses, instructional sequencing, delivery, and project and resource management. Students will also demonstrate how visual elements, information literacy, and delivery media affect message design in traditional and online environments.
  3. Development: Students will demonstrate how to convert design plans into physical and computer-based resources aligned to professional learning goals, standards, and objectives. They will also demonstrate how to deliver these resources via physical and electronic media.
  4. Evaluation: Students will demonstrate skills required to conduct both formative and summative assessments of instructional episodes and resources. These include problem analysis, expert review, usability testing, and instrument development and validation.
  5. Practical Competence: Students will demonstrate the ability to translate academic knowledge into expert practice related to their professional roles and specialized areas of interest.
  6. Professional Engagement: Students will demonstrate intellectual engagement and a reflective stance with instructional technology practices through creative and scholarly pursuits, advisor research, participation and presentations in professional associations, and related activities.


Special Education

The special education programs are designed to prepare teachers to work with students with varied learning and behavior needs. Students may choose from one of three programs: a master of arts in education with an option in special education or a special education endorsement program leading to eligibility for K-12 special education generalist endorsement through the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board (does not lead to a master's degree). A Special Education Director Endorsement Porgram is available as well.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the admission requirements of the university, candidates must also provide a current resume, a copy of current Wyoming Teaching Certificate, a signed Special Education Program Prospectus, a writing sample, three letters of recommendation, and undergraduate and graduate transcripts. A bachelor's degree, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25, from an accredited institution is also required. Please see the Special Education website for more details on these requirements.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Students may choose to complete the program on a part-time or full-time basis. All Special Education courses are offered either online or through video-conferencing sites within Wyoming only.

Program Courses

EDEX 5100 3
EDEX 5071 3
EDEX 5080 3
EDEX 5355 3
EDEX 5720 3
EDEX 5200 3
EDEX 5110 3
EDEX 5120 3
EDEX 5150 3
EDEX 5870 2
EDEX 5000 3

K-12 Endorsement/Certificate Program

The special education endorsement program requires a total of 31 credit hours and does not require a culminating activity. EDEX 5150/EDRE 5530/EDRE 5550 are not required for this program.

Master's Program

The Master's degree program requires a culminating activity. This activity may take a variety of forms but is either a Plan A (thesis) or a Plan B (project).

Students completing a Plan A will write a thesis that involves conducting a qualitative or quantitative study. This culminating activity should add new information and content to the field and is primarily for students who wish to learn more about the research process or who wish to continue their education toward a doctoral degree. The student's committee must approve the culminating activity as well as the topic. If a student chooses to write a Plan A paper, they must take either EDEX 5150 or EDRE 5550 and then also EDRE 5530 plus 4 additional thesis credit hours. The program requires 41 total credit hours.

Students completing a Plan B have several options from which to choose their culminating activity. These include:  a topical paper, an action research or case study investigation, an oral examination, the development of a complete grant application, or the development of a professional product (e.g. curriculum). The student's committee must approve the culminating activity as well as the topic. If a student chooses to write a Plan B paper, the student can choose between EDEX 5150 (Classroom Research), EDRE 5530 (Introduction to Research), or EDRE 5550 (Action Research). The program requires 34 total credit hours.

Special Education Director Endorsement Program

Students who successfully complete a University of Wyoming Principal's Certificate in Education Leadership and a University of Wyoming Master's Degree in Education (Special Education) can apply for endorsement as a Director of Special Education through Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board.

Program Details

The endorsement program requirements are available by completing both the Special Education Master's program and the Educational Leadership Principal Certificate program. The program is offered through the UW Outreach School using distance delivery such as video-conferencing, online, intensive weekends, or combinations of delivery methods. Upon completion of this program students are eligible to apply to the Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board for endorsement as a Director of Special Education.

Applicants who hold a BA/BS degree and have a Wyoming teaching certificate, or have submitted an application for a Wyoming teaching certificate, are eligible to apply for admission to this graduate program. Applicants who do not have a Special Education background will need to take a Special Education foundation course prior to beginning the program coursework.

Students expecting to obtain this endorsement must complete both the Special Education Master's courses and also the Educational Leadership Certification courses.

Learner Outcomes

Upon completion of the Master of Arts or the K-12 Certificate program in Special Education, the candidates will demonstrate their knowledge and skills in:

  1. The foundations of special education, to include: evidence-based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and issues of human diversity.
  2. The development and characteristics of learners, to include: a demonstrated respect of similarities and differences among learners with exceptional conditions and the use of this knowledge to respond to the varying abilities and behaviors of individuals.
  3. Individual learning differences, to include: the effects that an exceptional condition can have on an individual’s learning as well as understanding, and how language, culture, and family backgrounds interact with the individual’s exceptional condition.
  4. Instructional strategies, to include: evidence-based instructional strategies by which to individualize instruction, promote positive learning results, special curriculum materials, and the appropriate modification of the learning environment.
  5. The creation of learning environments and social interactions, to include: active student engagement, the value of diversity, supporting environments that encourage independence, providing help to general education colleagues, and methods to intervene with individuals with exceptional learning and behavioral needs in crisis.
  6. Language, to include: typical and atypical language development, strategies to teach communication skills, and strategies and resources to facilitate the understanding of subject matter for individuals with exceptional learning needs whose primary language is not English.
  7. Instructional planning, to include short and long range individualized instructional plans and goal setting which are developed and modified using data based decisions.
  8. Assessment, to include: multiple types of assessment information, principles of measurement and assessment, measurement theory and practice, formal and informal assessment, and regular and continuous progress monitoring. 
  9. Professional and ethical practice, to include: understanding and following legal and ethical principles relative to evidence-based practices.
  10. Collaboration, to include: collaborative support of families, educators, related service providers, and personnel from community agencies, as well as the supervision of paraprofessionals, all in culturally responsive ways.

 

Adult Education (ADED) Courses

Counseling (CNSL) Courses

K-12 Educational Leadership (EDAD) Courses

Educational Research (EDRE) Courses

Exceptional Children (EDEX) Courses

Library Science (LIBS) Courses

Professional Studies (PRST) Courses

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