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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

John McInroy, Department Head
5068 Engineering Building
Phone: (307) 766-2279 FAX: (307) 766-2248
Website: http://wwweng.uwyo.edu/electrical

Professors

STEVEN F. BARRETT, B.S. University of Nebraska 1979; M.E. University of Idaho 1986; Ph.D. University of Texas 1993; Professor of Electrical Engineering 2011, 1999.
JERRY C. HAMANN, B.S. University of Wyoming 1984; M.S. 1988; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison 1993; Professor of Electrical Engineering 2009, 1993.
STANISLAW F. LEGOWSKI, M.Sc. Technical University of Gdansk, Poland 1962; Ph.D. 1971; Professor of Electrical Engineering 1993, 1983.
SURESH S. MUKNAHALLIPATNA, B.E. University of Bangalore, India 1988; M.E. 1991; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 1995; Professor of Electrical Engineering 2010, 1997.
JOHN E. McINROY, B.S. University of Wyoming 1986; M.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1988; Ph.D. 1991; Professor of Electrical Engineering 2002, 1991.
JOHN W. PIERRE, B.S. Montana State University 1986; M.S. University of Minnesota 1989; Ph.D. 1991; Professor of Electrical Engineering 2002, 1991.
A. H. M. SADRUL ULA, B.Sc.E.E. Engineering College in Bangladesh 1968; M.Sc.E.E. University of Engineering and Technology in Bangladesh 1973; Ph.D. University of Leeds 1977; Professor of Electrical Engineering 1992, 1982.
DAVID L. WHITMAN, B.S. University of Wyoming 1975; Ph.D. 1978; Professor 1991, 1986, 1981.

Associate Professors

EVA S. FERRE-PIKAL, B.S. University of Puerto Rico 1988; M.S. University of Michigan 1989; Ph.D. University of Colorado 1996; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 2004, 1998.
ROBERT F. KUBICHEK, B.S., B.S.E.E. University of Wyoming 1976; M.S. 1977; Ph.D. 1985; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 1997, 1991.
JOHN F. O'BRIEN, B.S. California State Polytechnic University, Ponoma 1991; M.S. University of Wyoming 1997; PH.D. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 2001; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 2009, 2003.
JON M. PIKAL, B.S. Purdue University 1988; M.S. University of Colorado 1993; Ph.D. Colorado State University 1999; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 2005, 1999.
MARGARETA STEFANOVIC, Dipl. Ing., University of Nis, Yugoslavia 1996; M.S. University of Southern California 2002; Ph.D. 2005; Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 2011, 2005.
CAMERON H.G. WRIGHT, B.S. Louisiana Tech University 1983; M.S. Purdue University 1988; Ph.D. University of Texas 1996; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 2008, 2003.

Assistant Professor

DONGLIANG DUAN, B.E. Huazhong University of Science and Technology 2006; M.S. University of Florida 2009; Ph.D. Colorado State University 2012; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 2012.

Academic Professional

JEFFREY R. ANDERSON, B.S.E.E. University of Utah 1989; M.S.E.E 1992; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2004; Assistant Academic Professional Lecturer in Electrical and Computer Engineering 2006.

Adjunct Faculty

Elena Ogger, Guido Pagnacco

Instructor

Yelena V. O'Brien

Professors Emeriti

Christos T. Constantinides, Jerry J. Cupal, Clifford D. Ferris, Raymond G. Jacquot, Francis M. Long, John W. Steadman

Electrical Engineering

The program of study outlined in the curriculum has been planned to provide the depth of understanding necessary to meet challenges of changing technology while being flexible enough to allow students to pursue in-depth study in at least one area of electrical engineering. In order to attain this, students are required to gain an understanding of mathematics and the basic engineering sciences. The fundamental electrical engineering education consists of courses in circuits, networks, electromagnetics, electronics, digital systems, communications, controls and energy conversion. Selection of elective courses, in consultation with the academic adviser, enables students to specialize in the above mentioned areas, as well as in robotics, microcircuits, microprocessors and high frequency electronics.

Laboratory work associated with electrical engineering courses is an important part of the curricula. This work helps students gain experience in applying the theoretical knowledge they acquire to practical engineering problems. Engineering design is an important component of the curriculum that concludes with a significant design experience in the senior year. Additional programs are described below.

F. M. Long Bioengineering Option. Named in honor of UW Professor Francis M. Long, this area offers excellent opportunities for those interested in applying the techniques of the electronic engineer to problems of environmental science, biology and medicine. Employment opportunities exist in state and federal agencies, industry and medical institutions. Career placement includes such areas as environmental monitoring, design and development of biological and medical instrumentation and clinical engineering. With minor modifications, the curriculum shown may be used as preparation for entrance to medical or dental school.

Computer Engineering

Very rapid advances in semiconductor technology have made sophisticated digital devices available as an engineering tool. The computer engineering degree program is designed for those students who want a special emphasis in both the hardware and software associated with incorporating digital devices and microprocessors into various products and systems. It includes courses in computer science and electrical engineering for both software and hardware design. Extensive laboratory work gives students experience with wired logic and microprogrammed digital systems, microprocessors, personal computers, hardware descriptive language, and computer networks.

International Engineering Option. Engineering is a global profession and today's engineers must be able to work and interact in a variety of diverse cultural and technical environments. The international engineering option gives electrical and computer engineering students an opportunity to study culture and foreign language at the same time as they pursue their engineering degrees.

The option includes at least one semester of study abroad with courses taken in a foreign language. In addition, students may participate in a four-to-five month international internship. Foreign language skills can be earned through a variety of means, including formal university coursework, intensive summer language programs, and previous education.

Foreign language education and the study-abroad experience satisfy the cultural context requirements of the University Studies Program.

Educational Objectives. Graduates of the University of Wyoming Electrical and Computer Engineering Programs will have breadth of fundamental knowledge in mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering as well as depth of knowledge in electrical engineering or computer engineering; be able to communicate effectively within and outside their discipline and work effectively with others; be able to understand and resolve ill-defined problems; be effective independent learners; have the broad general education needed to appreciate the role of engineering in the societal context and appreciate the importance of ethics in the practice of the profession.

Grade Policy

Electrical and computer engineering majors must achieve a grade of C or better on courses that are prerequisites for courses within the student's course of study.  Students must also achieve a grade of C or better in all required mathematics courses.

Concurrent Major and Minor

The department offers a concurrent major and minor in both the electrical engineering and computer engineering programs. Consult the department office for a current detailed list of requirements.

Combined BS/MS Degree

The combined BS/MS program in Electrical and Computer Engineering enables especially well-qualified students to be admitted to the MS program during the junior year of their BS program and to work thereafter towards both the BS and MS degrees. These students would earn the BS degree in either Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering and the MS degree in Electrical Engineering following the current curricula. This program allows for early planning of the MS portion of the student's education, taking graduate courses as part of the BS degree, more flexibility in the order in which courses are taken, and more efficient use of what would otherwise be a final semester with a light credit hour load.

Program Objectives for Electrical and Computer Engineering

  • Graduates of the University of Wyoming Electrical and Computer Engineering Program will:
  • (EE/CP-OB1) Be able to successfully practice the profession of Electrical Engineering.
  • (EE/CP-OB2) Be prepared and motivated to accept challenging assignments and responsibilities and be productive members of society.
  • (EE/CP-OB3) Demonstrate successful career growth (e.g., professional registration, graduate school, promotion and advancement).

University of Wyoming, Electrical and Computer Engineering Program, Program Outcomes

All Electrical (Computer) Engineering graduates shall demonstrate:

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) an ability to communicate effectively

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Electrical Engineering Curriculum

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

ES 1000

1

MATH 2200

4

CHEM 1020

4

ENGL 1010

3

COSC 1010 or ES 1060

4

PEAC 1001

1

Total Hours

17

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

MATH 2250

3

ES 2110

3

PHYS 1210

4

US and WY Constitutions

3

EE 1010

1

Total Hours

18

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2310

3

ES 2120

3

ES 2210

3

PHYS 1220

4

Cultural Context / Tech Elective

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2210

4

EE 2390

4

EE 2220

4

Sciences / ES Elective

3

Total Hours

15

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

EE 3150

3

EE 3310

4

EE 3220

3

EE 3510

4

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

17

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 3330

4

EE 4390

4

EE 4440

3

EE 4620

3

EE 4075

4

Total Hours

17

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

EE 4820

2

EE 4220

3

EE Electives

5

Cultural Context

3

ENGL 4010

3

Total Hours

16

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 4830

2

EE Electives

8-9

Technical Electives

3

Cultural Electives

3

Total Hours

16-17

Computer Engineering Curriculum

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

ES 1000

1

MATH 2200

4

CHEM 1020

4

ENGL 1010

3

COSC 1030

4

PEAC 1001

1

Total Hours

17

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

ES 2110

3

PHYS 1210

4

COSC 1030

4

EE 1010

1

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2310

3

COSC 2030

4

ES 2120

3

ES 2210

3

PHYS 1220

4

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2210

4

MATH 2300

3

EE 2220

4

EE 2390

4

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

EE 3310

4

EE 3220

3

EE 4490

3

Cultural Context / Technical Elective

3

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

16

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 3150

3

EE 3330

4

EE 4390

3

Cultural Context

3

Science / ES Elective

3

Total Hours

16

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

EE 4820

2

EE 4870 or

4

COSC 4760

3

EE or COSC Elective

3

ENGL 4010

3

EE 4220

3

US and WY Constitutions

3

Total Hours

17/18

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 4830

2

CPEN Option Courses

6

EE or COSC Elective

3/4

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

14/15


Graduate Study

The department offers programs of study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in electrical engineering. The areas of major concentration at the graduate level are: control systems (including robotics and electrical energy), electronic systems and devices (including material devices and RF circuits), signal processing (including image processing, computer vision, and biomedical instrumentation), and computer networks. The department also offers a combined B.S./M.S. program for exceptional students wishing to obtain both degrees in a shorter period of time (see below).

Program Specific Admission Requirements

  • Statement of purpose
  • Official transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended
  • GRE verbal percentile minimum of 40 percent
  • GRE quantitative percentile minimum of 65 percent. ETS only reports GRE scores taken within five years of the date of request 
  • TOEFL total of 550 or 79 iBT

Program Specific Graduate Assistantships

The English Proficiency Assessment (EPA) is mandatory for incoming non-native English speaking international GAs with responsibilities in instruction. The English Proficiency Assessment is recommended for all international graduate students regardless of teaching responsibilities. Students also will need to follow recommendations for English language advancement.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master’s Programs

Plan A (thesis)

This is a 30 hour program, 26 hours coursework and 4 hours of thesis
16 (minimum) in ECE formal coursework
3 (minimum) in formal coursework outside the department and approved by the student’s committee
7 additional credits in or out of the department with committee approval
4 or more credits of M.S. thesis research
Of the above credit hours in formal coursework, no more than 12 can be 4000 level
The candidate must meet the minimum requirements for the Master of Science degree and also complete and defend a master’s thesis.

Plan B (non-thesis)

This is a 30 hour program:
18 (minimum) in ECE formal coursework
3 (minimum) in formal coursework outside the department and approved by the student’s committee
9 additional credits in or out of the department with committee approval
Of the above credit hours in formal coursework, no more than 12 can be 4000 level.
The candidate must meet the minimum requirements for the master of science degree and complete a plan B project.
Satisfying the “Plan B project” can be completed in one of the following ways:
Complete a project for a 5000-level EE course, including a class presentation
Complete an independent project under EE 5880 (up to three credit hours), including a presentation

Doctoral Program

Ph.D. Degree Requirements:
Ph.D. Credit Allocation (all at 4000 level minimum)
72 (minimum) of acceptable graduate coursework
42 (minimum) from ECE and closely related formal course work (EE 5980: Dissertation Research not counting toward this minimum)
Of those 42 hours, no more than 12 can be 4000 level
Courses required by the department bachelor of science degree may not be applied for graduate credit
6 (maximum) of EE 4800 (Problems in ...) can be counted for program of study credit
6 (maximum) of EE 5880 (Problems in ...) can be counted for program of study credit
9 (maximum) of EE 5600 (Statistical Signal Processing in ...) can be counted for program of study credit
In addition to the minimum requirements of the university, doctoral students must pass a written and oral comprehensive examination, part of which is a written proposal explaining their planned dissertation research. The student must also present and defend a completed dissertation. Programs of study, including coursework and any research tools, are arranged by consultation between the students and their graduate committee.

Quick Start BS/MS Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program in electrical and computer engineering enables especially well-qualified students to be admitted to the M.S. program during the junior year of their B.S. program, and to work thereafter towards both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. These students would earn the B.S. in either electrical engineering or computer engineering and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering following the current curricula. This program allows for early planning of the M.S. portion of the student’s education, taking graduate courses as part of the B.S. degree, more flexibility in the order in which courses are taken, and more efficient use of what would otherwise be a final semester with a light credit hour load.
Up to 6 credit hours from UW, at the 5000-level or above, may be counted toward both the B.S. and M.S. degree programs.
For further information please visit our Web site at wwweng.uwyo.edu/electrical/grad/bsms.html.

Electrical Engineering (EE) Courses

F. M. Long Bioengineering Curriculum

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

ES 1000

1

MATH 2200

4

CHEM 1020

4

ENGL 1010

3

COSC 1010 or ES 1060

3-4

PEAC 1001

1

Total Hours

16-17

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

ES 2110

3

PHYS 1210

4

CHEM 2300

4

EE 1010

1

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2310

3

ES 2120

3

ES 2210

3

PHYS 1220

4

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2210

4

EE 2390

4

EE 2220

4

MATH 2250

3

Total Hours

15

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

EE 3310

4

EE 3510

4

EE 3220

3

LIFE 1010

4

ENGL 4010

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 3330

4

EE 4075

4

EE 4390

3

LIFE 2022

4

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

18

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

BE 4810 or

3

EE 4330

4

EE 4820

2

EE 3150

3

EE 4220

3

EE Elective

3-4

Technical / Cultural Context Elective

3

Total Hours

17-18



Senior Year: Spring

Hours

EE 4250 or EE 4620

3

EE 4830

2

MOLB 3610

4

US and WY Constitutions

3

Cultural Context

3

Total Hours

15

Bioengineering (BE) Courses

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