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University Catalog

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Carl P. Frick, Department Head
2052 Engineering Building
Phone: (307) 766-2122
Email: me.info@uwyo.edu
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/mechanical/

Professors

DENNIS N. COON, B.S. Alfred University-New York; M.S. 1984; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University 1986; Professor of Mechanical Engineering 1999, 1988.
DIMITRI J. MAVRIPLIS, B.S. McGill University 1982; M.Eng. 1982; Ph.D. Princeton University 1987; Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2003.
JONATHAN W. NAUGHTON, B.S. Cornell University 1986; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University 1993; Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2012, 1997.

Associate Professors

PAUL A. DELLENBACK, B.S. Texas Tech University 1978; M.S. 1980; Ph.D. Arizona State University 1986; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 1994, 1990.
CARL P. FRICK, B.S. University of Colorado at Boulder 1999; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. 2005; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2014, 2008; Head of Mechanical Engineering 2015.
CHUNG-SOUK HAN, Dipl.-Ing. Darmstadt University of Technology, 1994; Dr.-Ing. University of Hannover, 1999; Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2010.

Assistant Professors

DILPUNEET S. AIDHY, B.E. Punjab Engineering College 2004; Ph.D. University of Florida 2009; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2015.
ERICA L. BELMONT,
B.S. Tufts University 2004; M.S. 2008; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin 2014; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2014.
JIAN CAI,
B.E. University of Science and Technology of China 2005; Ph.D. Clemson University 2010; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2015.
RAY S. FERTIG III,
B.S. University of Wyoming 2001; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. Cornell University 2010; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2011.
MICHAEL STOELLINGER, M.S. Technical University Munich 2005; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2010; Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 2012.

Professor of Practice

LAWRENCE D. WILLEY, B.S. University of Hartford 1982; M.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1984; Professor of Practice in Mechanical Engineering 2017.

Associate Lecturers

KEVIN KILTY, B.S. Montana State University 1975; M.S. University of Utah 1978; Ph.D. 1982; Associate Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 2014.
NANCY (ANN) PECK,
B.S. Lehigh University 1984; M.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1987; Ph.D. 1992; Associate Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 2000, 1997.

Professors Emeriti

Donald F. Adams
Bruce R. Dewey
Andrew Hansen
William R. Lindberg
John E. Nydahl
Kynric M. Pell
Ovid A. Plumb
Donald A. Smith
David E. Walrath
Robert A. Wheasler

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering is the broadest area of study in engineering. In contrast to other engineering disciplines, mechanical engineers are employed in significant percentages in almost all industrial and governmental organizations that employ engineers.

The spectrum of activities in which mechanical engineers are engaged continues to expand. The curriculum has in turn become flexible to allow for the education of mechanical engineering students in many diverse and allied areas, or for graduate school preparation.

The educational objectives of the Department of Mechanical Engineering are as follows:

  • Successfully practice the profession of engineering
  • Demonstrate career growth (e.g. increasing complexity of job assignment, career promotions, professional registration, patents, publications, and completion of advanced degrees)

The undergraduate program includes a foundation in mathematics, science, and engineering sciences. The three key elements of the mechanical engineering undergraduate program are laboratory experience, design experience, and development of communication skills.

The mechanical engineering curriculum affords the student the flexibility to pursue specific professional goals within the discipline.  Such an opportunity needs to be carefully considered by each student, so that elective courses are chosen with these goals in mind.  During the junior and senior years, the student selects 15 credit hours of technical electives.

Mechanical and Energy Systems Engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.000 (C) in Mechanical and/or Energy Systems engineering courses completed at this university. A grade of C- or better must be earned in all engineering science and required mathematics courses.

Policy for Transfer Credit Towards Energy Systems Engineering (ESE) Core Coursework

In general, transfer of coursework towards an Energy Systems Engineering degree will follow University of Wyoming policy. Courses must be shown to be equivalent to its University of Wyoming course (latitude may be given for Engery Systems Engineering electives without a direct University of Wyoming equivalent). However, three courses are considered to be the core of the Energy Systems Engineering program, and therefore credit cannot be transferred from another institution. These courses are ESE 3020, ESE 3040, and ESE 3360. Exceptions may be made for courses from approved study abroad programs or in extreme circumstances. Please note that failing a prerequisite course resulting in a delay of graduation does not constitute an extreme circumstance. Any transfer of ESE courses requires explicit written approval from the Department.

Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum

All undergraduate students in the B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Energy Systems Engineering programs must successfully complete the Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-level or above) courses taught by the Mechanical Engineering Department. The Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum promotes successful completion of upper-division coursework by assuring a student that their foundational knowledge and skills are strong in mathematics and engineering fundamentals. To successfully complete the Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum, a student must earn a minimum 3.000 GPA in the following 10 courses: MATH 2200, MATH 2205, MATH 2210, ES 1060, ES 2110, ES 2120, ES 2210, ES 2310, ES 2330, and ES 2410. AP courses are excluded from the GPA calculation, but grades transferred from other institutions will be used in evaluating the ME Success Curriculum GPA.

Dual ME/ESE Degrees

In the event that a student desires to double major in ME and ESE, Department policy requires that 30 credit hours past the first degree are required to earn the second degree, and 24 of these credit hours must be technical coursework approved by the Department while up to 6 hours can be any student-chosen electives.

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum*

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2200

4

First-Year Seminar (FYS)

3

U.S. and WY Constitutions

3

CHEM 1020

4

ENGL 1010 (COM1)

3

Total Hours

17

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

ES 2110

3

COJO 2010 (COM2)

3

Human Culture (H)1

3

Math/Science Elective2

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

ES 1060

3

ES 2120

3

ES 2210

3

MATH 2210

4

PHYS 1220

4

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2310

3

ES 2310

3

ES 2330

3

ES 2410

3

ENGL 2005

3

CHEM 1030 or PHYS 2310 or PHYS 2320

3-4

Total Hours

18-19

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

ME 3005

3

ME 3010

3

ME 3020

3

ME 3040

3

ME 3060

3

Human Culture1 (H)

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

ME 3160

3

ME 3170

3

ME 3360

3

ME 3450

3

ME 4020

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

ME 4060

3

ME Elective3

3

ME Elective3

3

Math/Science Elective2

3

Business Elective4

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

ME 4070 (COM3)

3

ME Elective5

3

ME Elective5

3

ME 4150

3

Technical Elective5

3

Total Hours

15

Total Hours to BSME Degree

131

1 Approved H course in USP 2015
2 Math/Science Electives must be chosen from a Department approved list.
3 ME Elective: Any ME course or EE 4620.
4 Business Elective must be chosen from a Department approved list.
5 Technical Elective: May be chosen from any engr. approved math/science, or approved business.
42 hours of 3000+ level coursework fulfilled by required ME courses and ME Electives.
Degree candidates must meet academic requirements of the college and have a minimum grade point average of 2.000 in all ME courses completed at UW.

Graduate Study

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers graduate study leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Faculty in Mechanical Engineering conduct research in the areas of aerodynamics, biomaterials, composite materials, computational material science, computational fluid dynamics, combustion and gasification, continuum mechanics, heat transfer, materials reliability, mechanical behavior of materials, nanomechanics of surfaces and interfaces, and wind energy.

Department Specific Admission Requirements

Applicants should possess a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree or equivalent in Mechanical Engineering with a minimum GPA of 3.000 on a 4.000 grade scale or equivalent. Students that do not hold B.S./M.E. degrees may qualify as M.S. candidates by completing, without credit, certain prerequisite courses as specified by the Department. These prerequisites would depend upon the candidate’s background and upon the area in which he/she plans to specialize.

In addition to the required application materials (i.e. application form, academic transcript, GRE, TOFEL, or IELTS scores, letters of reference) the applicant must submit a Statement of Purpose indicating their technical area of interest, abilities, and objectives in completing a graduate degree in mechanical engineering.

A minimum composite score of 294 (MS) or 307 (PhD) on the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the GRE is typically required for full admission to the Mechanical Engineering Department. For international students, a minimum TOEFL score of 577 on the written exam or 90 on the Internet-based test (iBT), TOEFL or 65 IELTS is typically required for full admission (or a minimum IELTS score of 6.5). Admittance to the graduate program is competitive, and the average applicant that is accepted will likely have well above the minimum qualifications.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master of Science (M.S.) Program

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers both a thesis (Plan A) and a non-thesis (Plan B) M.S. program. No graduate credit is allowed for 4000-level mechanical engineering courses.

Plan A (thesis)

A thesis project is chosen in consultation with an ME faculty member, and constitutes 4 credit hours of ME 5960 of the 30-hour Plan A program. A maximum of 9 credits at the 4000-level may be taken outisde of mechanical engineering. ME 5478 (Seminar) is to be taken during the final semester when the thesis is presented and defended, and constitutes 2 credit hours of the 30-hour Plan A program.

Plan B (non-thesis)

The Plan B M.S. degree can be completed by earning a minimum of 31 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree. Classes must meet the following constraints:

  • Mathematics or Statistics (4000-level or above); minimum of 6 hours
  • ME courses (5000-level); minimum of 15 hours
  • Graduate Project (ME 5961); minimum of 1 hour
  • Technical Electives (4000-level or higher); minimum of 9 hours
  • Total: minimum of 31 hours 

Technical electives must be chosen with the approval of the academic adviser. They can be in mathematics, statistics, science, or other engineering disciplines. Up to two courses may be from the fields of business, ENR, or public policy.

  • A maximum of 9 credits at the 4000 level may be taken.
  • Special topic credits may be earned using ME 5475; a maximum of 6 credits may be earned in this manner.
  • Research credits earned through ME 5960 as part of an unfinished M.S. Plan A program may not be counted. Although the Plan B M.S. degree is not research-oriented, the program must contain an "element of discovery," documented by completing ME 5961 (Graduate Project). This could be a special project performed as independent study or as part of a graduate course.

Quick Start BS/MS Program

Through judicious choice of undergraduate electives, this program allows double-counting up to two 5000-level courses from the B.S. program toward M.S. degree requirements, thus reducing the time requirement for completing an M.S. degree. Students can apply for admission to the B.S./M.S. program by achieving junior status and meeting the following requirements for admission:

  • completion of the four core ME courses (ME 3010, ME 3020, ME 3040, and ME 3360),
  • a minimum overall GPA of 3.250,
  • a minimum GPA of 3.250 in ME courses, and
  • a minimum of three letters of recommendation (at least two must be from ME faculty at UW).
  • Contact Department for application process.

Students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.250 in their undergraduate and at least 3.000 in their graduate coursework in order to remain in good standing in the program. Not meeting the GPA requirement places a student on probation for one semester. If the GPA requirement is not met after that semester, the student will be dismissed from the Quick Start program. Transfer students must have taken courses equivalent to the ME core courses. Transfer students must have also completed at least 15 credit hours of courses at UW in order to be eligible for admission.

Until a student in this program has completed a total of 131 credit hours of courses applicable to the BS or MS degree in Mechanical Engineering, he/she will be governed by the regulations applicable to undergraduate students in the Department. After a student has accumulated a total of 131 applicable credit hours, he/she will be governed by the regulations applicable to any graduate student in the ME department. These regulations include the requirement that every student must take the GRE general examination. It is the intention of the department that, to the degree possible, a student in this program is treated on the same basis as any other student in the department at a comparable stage of his/her academic career.

With the recommendation of the student’s academic advisor and the approval of the ME Graduate Affairs Committee, as many as 6 credit hours of ME department courses at the 5000 level may be counted towards both the undergraduate degree requirements and the requirements for the MS degree. In principle, therefore, the minimum number of course credit hours required for the BS/MS degrees will be 151 (for Plan A students + 4 additional hours of thesis research) or 156 (for Plan B students - non-thesis option).

Doctoral Program

For students of outstanding academic ability and with demonstrated capacity for undertaking independent research on advanced engineering problems, the Ph.D. program in mechanical engineering is offered. The Ph.D. requires a minimum of 72 graduate hours, at least 42 of which must be earned in formal coursework. A minimum of 24 in-resident coursework hours is required. No graduate credit is allowed for 4000-level mechanical engineering courses.

In addition to coursework requirements, graduate students pursuing a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering must complete three examinations: Qualifying, Preliminary, and Final. In consultation with their advisor, students are allowed to take the Qualifying Exam after delaring pusuit of a Ph.D. degree. Graduate students do not require a M.S. to take the Qualifying Exam. The format is a knowledge-based examination consisting of three subject areas, each with both a written and an oral component. The candidate will be evaluated for each subject area, based on the cumulative performance in both (written and oral) components. Should the student fail a single subject area, at the discretion of the committee, they may repeat the failed portion at the next available opportunity. A third attempt is not permitted. The successful completion of the Qualifying Exam is required before the Preliminary Exam. The purpose of the Preliminary Exam is to evaluate the aptitude of the Ph.D. candidate to perform research based on preliminary results, and to assess the student’s plan for completing the research necessary for the Final Exam. The Preliminary Exam follows university regulations and, at a minimum, consists of a seminar attended by the student’s committee members. The purpose of the Final Exam is to ensure the Ph.D. candidate has sufficient accomplishments to be awarded a Ph.D. The Final Exam consists of an oral defense of the dissertation in accordance with university policy.

Mechanical Engineering (ME) Courses

Energy Systems Engineering

Energy Systems Engineering is an ABET-accredited undergraduate degree offering by the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The ESE program was designed to train engineers to address one of this country's foremost challenges:  to achieve energy independence and yet meet the growing demand for energy, while at the same time addressing critical environmental concerns. The program is intended to help meet these challenges by preparing students to be:

  • technology leaders in energy conversion and environmental protection systems
  • capable managers in the energy industry
  • versatile overseers of energy development by the governmental sector
  • technically-trained and environmentally-sensitive liaisons between the energy industry and the public.

ESE students will be trained in alternative and environmentally-friendly energy conversion systems, as well as more traditional technologies that will continue to play an important role for the foreseeable future.

Although the discipline of mechanical engineering has historically been responsible for the design of energy conversion cycles and equipment, issues outside the conventional realms of engineering are increasingly important to address as new and improved energy conversion systems are implemented. The engineer trained in Energy Systems will be better equipped than traditional mechanical engineers to deal with the environmental, legal, political, economic, and permitting aspects of new energy projects.

It should be emphasized that ESE is a rigorous engineering program that requires dedicated preparation in high school, including four years of math, science, and language arts. The ESE degree has many course work requirements in common with the Mechanical Engineering degree, particularly in the thermal, fluids, and energy conversion sciences. However, the ESE program emphasizes energy conversion aspects of Mechanical Engineering and requires course work from UW's School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR), course work in environmental ethics and environmental law, and two electives picked from a list of classes that focus attention on energy and the environment. The SENR courses will expose students to issues related to permitting such as preparation of environmental impact studies, and regulations such as the Endangered Species Act. In addition, there are five technical electives that allow the student to choose more detailed study in personal areas of interest, including for example, courses in environmental engineering, wind engineering, solar engineering, nuclear engineering, and petroleum engineering.

The educational objectives of the ESE program are the same as those listed for the ME program. Energy Systems Engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the College and must have a minimum GPA of 2.000 (C) in ESE and ME course work. An International Engineering Option similar to that in ME is also available. A grade of C- or better in engineering science, mathematics, and basic sciences courses is required to fulfill prerequisites in Mechanical and Energy Systems engineering courses. A grade of C or better is required for any transfer course from another university.

Energy Systems Engineering Success Curriculum

All undergraduate students in the B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Energy Systems Engineering programs must successfully complete the Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-level or above) courses taught by the Mechanical Engineering Department. The Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum promotes successful completion of upper-division coursework by assuring a student that their foundational knowledge and skills are strong in mathematics and engineering fundamentals. To successfully complete the Mechanical Engineering Success Curriculum, a student must earn a minimum 3.000 GPA in the following 10 courses: MATH 2200, MATH 2205, MATH 2210, ES 1060, ES 2110, ES 2120, ES 2210, ES 2310, ES 2330, and ES 2410. AP courses are excluded from the GPA calculation, but grades transferred from other institutions will be used in evaluating the ME Success Curriculum GPA.

Policy for Transfer Credit Towards Mechanical Engineering (ME) Core Coursework

In general, transfer of coursework towards a Mechanical Engineering degree will follow University of Wyoming policy. Courses must be shown to be equivalent to its University of Wyoming course (latitude may be given for Mechanical Engineering electives without a direct University of Wyoming equivalent). However, six courses are considered to be the core of the Mechanical Engineering program, and therefore credit cannot be transferred from another institution. These courses are ME 3010, ME 3020, ME 3040, ME 3170, ME 3360, and ME 3450. Exceptions may be made for courses from approved study abroad programs or in extreme circumstances. Please note that failing a prerequisite course resulting in a delay of graduation does not constitute an extreme circumstance. Any transfer of ME courses requires explicit written approval from the Department.

Dual ME/ESE Degrees

In the event that a student desires to double major in ME and ESE, Department policy requires that 30 credit hours past the first degree are required to earn the second degree, and 24 of these credit hours must be technical coursework approved by the Department while up to 6 hours can be any student-chosen electives.

Energy Systems Engineering Option Curriculum*

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2200

4

First-Year Seminar (FYS)

3

U.S. and WY Constitutions

3

CHEM 1020

4

ENGL 1010 (COM1)

3

Total Hours

17

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

ES 2110

3

COJO 2010 (COM2)

3

Human Culture1 (H)

3

LIFE 1010

4

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

ES 1060

3

ES 2120

3

ES 2210

3

MATH 2210

4

PHYS 1220

4

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2310

3

ES 2310

3

ES 2330

3

ES 2410

3

Math/Science Elective2

3

ATSC 2100

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

ESE 3005

3

ESE 3020

3

ESE 3040

3

ESE 3060

3

ESE Elective5

3

Total Hours

15

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

ESE 3160

3

ESE 3360

3

Technical Elective3

3

PHIL 2330 or 2345

3

Law Elective4

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

ESE 4060

3

Technical Elective3

3

Technical Elective3

3

ENR 3000

3

Human Culture1 (H)

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

ESE 4070 (COM3)

3

Technical Elective3

3

ENR 4900

3

ESE Elective5

3

Business Elective6

3

Total Hours

15

Total Hours to BSME Degree

129

1 Approved H course in USP 2015
2 Math/Science Electives must be chosen from a Department approved list.
3 Four Technical Electives to be chosen from: PETE 2050, Intro to Petroleum Engineering; GEOL 4190, Petroleum Geology; CE 3400, Intro to Environmental Engineering; CE 4430, Environmental Engineering Chemistry; ME 3450, Properties of Materials; ME 4020, Mechatronics; ME 4340, Gas Turbine Engines; ME 4470, Wind and Tidal Energy Engineering; ME 4460, Solar and Geothermal Engineering; ESE 4330, Gasoline and Diesel Engines; ESE 4360, Nuclear Engineering; and ESE 4380 Steam Plant Engineering. Four Business Electives must be chosen from a Department approved list.
4 Law Elective to be chosen from: ENR 4890, Environmental Law; ENR 4890, ENR Law and Policy; or ENR 4890, Applied GIS.
5 ESE Electives (2) to be chosen from:  ENR 4890, Applied GIS; POLS 4051, Environmental Politics; POLS 4350, Sustainable Development and Global Policy; GEOL 3500, Global Change - A Geologic Perspective; GEOL 3650, Energy - A Geologic Perspective; PETE 4000, Environment, Tech, and Society; ECON 1300, Oil: Business, Culture, and Power; ENR 2000, Environment and Society; and ENR 4890, Economics of Natural Resource Scarcity Wildlife Law and Energy Development.
6 Business Elective must be chosen from Department approved list.
Degree candidates must meet academic requirements of the college and have a minimum grade point average of 2.000 in all ESE courses completed at UW.

Energy Systems Engineering (ESE) Courses


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