Some of the content on this website requires JavaScript to be enabled in your web browser to function as intended. While the website is still usable without JavaScript, it should be enabled to enjoy the full interactive experience.

Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Anthropology (ANTH)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1000. Intellectual Community in Anthropology. 1-3 (Max. 3) [(none)<>I] Orients students to the major and UW facilities important to academic success. In addition, skills such as critical thinking are emphasized through reading and discussion of articles on anthropological questions. Faculty panels introduce students to a variety of current topics in anthropology. Prerequisite: available to first or second semester freshmen through controlled enrollment. Students in ANTH, HIST and other social sciences have priority.

1100. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 4. [C2, G1<>SB] Basic concepts relating to the origin, evolution and biological nature of the human species.

1200. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Introduction to foreign, especially non-western, cultures through anthropological concepts, films and ethnographies.

1300. Introduction to Archaeology. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Explores ways in which prehistoric material remains can provide an understanding of the cultural way of life. General background in archaeological method and theory is used to examine case studies from throughout the world, based on themes such as ceramic technology and artistry development, growth of early civilizations and North American prehistory.

1450. World Archaeology. 3. [(none)<>CS, G] World Prehistory. Recommended for non-majors. A survey of the archaeology of Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia, and the Americas from the evolution of humans to the origins of agriculture to the rise of civilizations such as that of Egypt, China, and Mexico.

2000. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology. 3. [(none)<>L] Demonstrates the interrelationship of language, human biology, and culture at the introductory level. Linguistic anthropological methods and theories are used to examine linguistic behaviors used throughout the world. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, 1200 or 1300.

2200. World Culture. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Provides an understanding of cultural behavior of people in various geographical areas of the world. Students read ethnographies, cultural descriptions of societies, written by cultural anthropologists. (Normally offered at least once a year)

2210. North American Indians. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, D] Comparative consideration of North American Indian culture areas at European contact period. Cross listed with AIST 2210. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2700. Introduction to Museology. 3. [(none)<>CH] Explores the historical, cultural, and contemporary roles of museums and preservation institutions in society. Introduces students to the museum professions, collection and exhibition installation strategies, and ethical problems of governance and collection. Field trips to regional collections are included. Cross listed with AMST/ART/HIST 2700. Prerequisite: WA.

2730. African Creativity and Ritual. 3. [C3, G1<>CA, G] In a thematic organization, explores both North African and sub-Saharan cultures, incorporating issues pertinent to art history, African American studies, religious studies and women's studies. Looks at music, dance, body language, festival, celebration, coming of age rituals, fertility rites, harvest and funerals. Cross listed with AAST/ART 2730.

3015 [2015]. Introduction to the Music of the World's Peoples. 3. [W2, C3, G1<>WB, G] Introduces music of the world's peoples. Students actively study and document living musical traditions and hear, research and study music from a wide variety of geographical areas of the world. Cross listed with MUSC 3015. Prerequisite: MUSC 1000.

3300. Ethnographic Methods in Anthropology. 3. [W2<>WB] Introduces anthropology majors to ethnographic fieldwork, the fundamental method in cultural anthropology. Students conduct fieldwork and discuss research problems including ethics and the role of the researcher. Open to students in related fields of humanities and social sciences. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered fall semester)

3310. Introduction to Anthropology Research Methods. 3. [M3<>(none)] Introduces anthropology majors to use of the discipline's scientific method through problem formation, research data acquisition and research techniques used by anthropologists. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, 1200, and 1300. (Normally offered spring semester)

3400. Hunters and Gatherers. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Describes cultural adaptation of hunter-gatherer societies using both the ethnographic and archaeological record from the Arctic to tropical jungles. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, 1200, or 1300. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3420. The Anthropology of Global Issues. 3. Using anthropology's long-term, holistic and comparative approaches, the course examines key global issues, e.g., poverty, war, disease, environmental degradation, and terrorism from an anthropological perspective. Cross listed with INST 3420. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

3600. Archaeological Sciences. 3. Examines the biological, chemical and physical analytical methods used to reconstruct ancient human behavior. Includes radiometric and other dating methods, analysis of DNA and other organic molecules, stable isotope analysis of bone and sediments to reconstruct diet, environment, and migrations, trace elements for sourcing materials, and remote sensing. Prerequisite: completion of USP science requirement.

4000. Conference. 1‑4 (Max. 4). Guided independent study. Prerequisites: senior standing and 15 hours in anthropology. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4010. History of Anthropological Thought. 3. [W3<>WC] Designed as the capstone course for senior majors. Surveys anthropological theory development. Explores major trends and their relationships. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100, 1200, 1300, 3300, and 3310. (Normally taken in student's final semester)

4015. Archaeological Theory and Method. 3. Introduces the students to past and present archaeological theories through a literature survey of significant topics. Addresses questions, such as: How do archaeologists identify and solve problems? What do they perceive to be problems? What is the logic of archaeological arguments? Dual listed with ANTH 5015. Prerequisites: ANTH 1200, 1300, 3310, and at least one 4000 regional course.

4020. Seminar. 3‑6 (Max. 6). Considers current topics of anthropological interest. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit when the subject matter of the seminar is different. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, 1200, or 1300. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4110. Zooarchaeology I. 3. Introductory level seminar in the archaeological analysis of faunal materials. Emphasis is on identification and curation of bones from archaeological and Late Pleistocene paleontological contexts, including their use in the interpretation of prehistoric and historic human behavior, the investigation of paleoenvironmental conditions and paleoecological relationships and problem-oriented taphonomic research. Dual listed with ANTH 5110. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

4111. Zooarchaeology II. 3. Advanced level seminar in the archaeological analysis of faunal materials. Emphasis is on study of bones as an integrated component of basic archaeological research, including their use in the investigation of paleoenvironmental conditions and paleoecological relationships as well as problem-oriented taphonomic research, and the interpretation of human behavior. Dual listed with ANTH 5111. Prerequisite: ANTH 4110/5110.

4115. Lithic Analysis. 3. An overview of the analysis of stone tools and waste flakes from archaeological sites. Emphasizes appropriate use of typology and methods of debitage analysis. Dual listed with ANTH 5115. Prerequisites: ANTH 1300 and 9 additional hours in anthropology.

4116. Advanced Lithic Analysis. 3. An in-depth consideration of a single or limited range of topics in lithic analysis, or a group project focused on a case study. Dual listed with ANTH 5116. Prerequisite: ANTH 4115.

4120. North American Archaeology. 3. Studies North American prehistory from the earliest evidence to historic times. Dual listed with ANTH 5120. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300. (Normally offered every third semester)

4125 [4100]. Northwestern Plains Prehistory. 3. Northwestern Plains archaeology from the Paleoindian period to historic contact. A review of important sites and artifact types, ongoing UW research projects, regional and other expressions of ideology, Native American ethnohistory and contemporary perspectives, and historic preservation issues. Dual listed with ANTH 5125. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300. (Normally offered every third semester)

4130. Old World Archaeology. 3. Surveys major archaeological sequences of the Old World. Dual listed with ANTH 5130. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300. (Normally offered every third semester)

4135. Quantitative Methods in Anthropology. 3. A consideration of the use of quantitative methods in anthropological research, including descriptive and inferential statistics, pattern search, mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Dual listed with ANTH 5135. Prerequisite: STAT 2070 or equivalent.

4140. Archaeological Field Study. 2‑6 (Max. 6). Summarizes a regional prehistory and gives practical and theoretical training in archaeological field methods. Field projects are located specific areas of the world (e.g., Wyoming, Croatia, Peru). Prerequisite: ANTH 1300 or 4120 or 4125 or 4130 or 4150. (Normally offered summer session)

4150. Seminar in Prehistory. 1-3 (Max. 9). Covers the prehistory of a specified region or time period within that region. Emphasizes learning prehistoric sequences, material culture, and research questions associated with the topic. Topics include, but are not limited to, Paleoindian, Archaic, Siberian, Northern Plains, Great Basin, Rocky Mountain, or Southwestern Archaeology. Dual listed with ANTH 5150. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

4155. Computer Programming for Archaeologists. 3. Introduces the application of computer programming to the collection, management, and analysis (hypothesis testing) of archaeological data.  Develop models and simulations of complex prehistoric systems.   Begins with an introduction to Microsoft Excel (Visual Basic for Applications), programming structure, and applications to archaeology.  Specific assignments in writing programs relevant to typical archaeological problems. Dual listed with ANTH 5155. Prerequisites: ANTH 1300 or consent of instructor.

4160. GIS in Anthropology. 4. Introduction to how and why geographic information systems (GIS) are used in anthropology. Considers: 1) background, definitions, and concepts of geographic data and GIS; 2) Anthropological and archaeological approaches to GIS; and 3) hands-on-experience with GIS applications in archaeology through demonstrations, lectures, and structured inquiries. Dual listed with ANTH 5160. Prerequisites: ANTH 1200 or 1300.

4170. Geoarchaeology. 3. Introduces students to theory and method in geoarchaeological research. Emphasis is placed upon geomorphical processes of archaeological site formation and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Dual listed with ANTH 5170. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

4190. Public Archaeology. 3. A consideration of archaeological legislation, policies and regulations; compliance, heritage, and avocational archaeology, cultural resource management; curation; and professional archaeological ethics. Dual listed with 5190. Prerequisites: none.

4210. Human Osteology. 3. Provides a detailed study of the human skeleton. Dual listed with ANTH 5210. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, LIFE 2022. (Normally offered spring semester)

4215 [4200]. Evolution and Hominin Fossils. 3. Surveys hominin fossil record in context of evolutionary process, stressing structure-function and the dynamics of adaptive responses. Dual listed with ANTH 5215. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100. (Normally offered every third semester)

4220. Human Variation. 3. Studies age and sex differences, as well as race as a biological phenomenon. Includes origin and distribution of human races and adaptive significance of racial traits. Dual listed with ANTH 5220. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100. (Normally offered every third semester)

4230. Forensic Anthropology. 3. Introduces methods and purposes of physical anthropology as applied in human identification for law enforcement agencies. Dual listed with ANTH 5230; cross listed with CRMJ 4230. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100. (Normally offered fall semester of odd-numbered years)

4240. Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. 2. Studies details of advanced osteometric procedures, particularly as applied to problems of human skeletal identification. Dual listed with ANTH 5240. Prerequisite: ANTH 4210. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4255. Bioarchaeology. 3. Study of the human skeleton in archaeological context to reveal the biological and cultural pasts of individuals and communities. Using case studies, covers the history of the field, ethics of working with human remains, theoretical and methodological approaches to mortuary archaeology. Gain hands-on experience by working with specimens from the UWyoming Human Remains Repository. Dual listed with ANTH 5255. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100 or 1300.

4260. Anthropology of Food, Culture, and Nutrition. 3. Offers a biocultural perspective to the study of diet, nutrition, subsistence, and food systems.  Study includes basic nutritional principles and diet seen in evolutionary, cross-cultural, ethnographic, and historical perspective; method and theory in nutritional anthropology; and contemporary issues in nutrition, cuisine, and foodways. Dual Listed with ANTH 5260. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100 or 1200.

4300. Anthropology of Religion. 3. Provides a comparative anthropological study of religious systems, emphasizing analysis of symbolism, myth and ritual. Dual listed with ANTH 5300. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4310. Environmental Anthropology. 3. Addresses how human societies interact with their surroundings, emphasizing cultural understandings of the environment. Introduces variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to topics ranging from problems of the American West to global environmental change. Cross listed with ENR 4310. Dual listed with ANTH 5310. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4315. Human Behavioral Ecology. 3. Examines the models and techniques of human behavioral ecology applied to hunter-gatherer societies; covers foraging, demography, life history, division of labor, sharing, and social inequality. Dual listed with ANTH 5315. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100, 1200, and 1300.

4320. Political Anthropology. 3. Encompasses theories and descriptions of relationships between power and society in both less formal tribal contexts and more highly structured political institutions. Dual listed with ANTH 5320. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4325. Symbolic Anthropology. 3. Teaches several anthropological approaches to symbolic and cultural analysis, while reading ethnographic examples of how symbolic analysis can be used to understand different cultures. Coursework assumes a basic knowledge of social science concepts. Dual listed with ANTH 5325. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or SOC 1000.

4330. Social Organization. 3. Provides theories of social organization, interrelations of social institutions, and current anthropological methods of interpretation. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4340. Culture Change. 3. Examines representative theories of change, factors involved, dynamics of modernization and applied anthropology. Dual listed with ANTH 5340. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4350. Medical Anthropology. 3. Understandings of health and illness vary widely. Taking a comparative historical approach, examines how an individual's interactions with sociocultural and physical environments influence the experiences of health and illness. Topics include symbolic healing, biomedicine as a cultural system, disease and international development, global politics of AIDS and other pandemics. Dual listed with ANTH 5350. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or SOC 1000.

4360. Psychological Anthropology. 3. Introduces methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illness and cognition in non-western societies. Dual listed with ANTH 5360. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4380. Visual Anthropology. 3. Offers anthropological interpretation of visual representations and media, including analysis of the development of ethnographic films and their contemporary use. Visual representations of many cultures as well as mainstream United States examples are analyzed. Dual listed with ANTH 5380. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

4740. Native American Languages and Cultures. 3. Demonstrates the interrelationship of language and culture in several Native American communities. Examines anthropological and linguistic theories regarding language spread and the peopling of North America, narrative performance, translation, and the connection between linguistic structures and cultural features. Dual listed with ANTH 5740; cross listed with AIST 4740. Prerequisite: ANTH 2000 or 5760.

4775. Language and Gender. 3. Investigates the relationship between language use, linguistic categories, and gender categories. Examines the linguistic practices involved in the formulation, discussion, and performance of gender categories in a number of different cultures. Dual listed with ANTH 5775; cross listed with WMST 4775. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200, 2000.

4785. Language and Racism. 3. Explores the ways in which racist ideology and socially-based racial categories are reinforced and changed through language and linguistic usage. The forms of language used in the construction of covertly and overtly racist communication, and the media through which racism is communicated also will be investigated. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or 2000.

4795. Language Change. 3. Considers how languages change over time, due to both internal and external forces. The effects of language contact, borrowing, and structural change are discussed. The use of linguistic data for questions of migration and cultural contact are also explored. Dual listed with ANTH 5795. Prerequisite: ANTH 2000.

4970. Internship 1-12 (Max. 12). Allows students to gain hands-on experience, bridging the gap between anthropology as an academic discipline and anthropology as practiced in museums, public archaeology agencies, non-governmental organizations, and private consulting companies. Involves a required academic component in addition to work experience. Internship credit cannot fulfill requirements of the major. Prerequisites: anthropology major of junior/senior standing and consent of internship director and/or department head.

4975. Undergraduate Practicum in Anthropology. 1-4 (Max. 6). Affords students the opportunity to extend research projects in field or lab locations and receive additional credit for their work. Students sign up for these hours only in conjunction with another course and with the instructor's consent. Prerequisites: 9 hours in anthropology, consent of instructor.

5000. Special Problems. 1-4 (Max. 12). Conference course to allow graduate students opportunity for both guided and independent research. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5005. Graduate Seminar in Anthropology. 3 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

5010. 20th Century Anthropology Theory. 3. Examines major thinkers and schools of thought in anthropology of the 20th century. Emphasis is on cultural theory within the context of the four-field approach. Prerequisite: graduate standing in anthropology.

5015. Archaeological Theory and Method. 3. Introduces the students to past and present archaeological theories through a literature survey of most significant topics. Addresses questions, such as: How do archaeologists go about identifying and solving problems? What do they perceive to be problems? What is the logic of archaeological arguments? Dual listed with ANTH 4015. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200, 1300, 3310, and at least one 4000 regional course.

5020. Biological Anthropology. 3. Offers a graduate level overview of biological anthropology. Beginning with the history of relevant areas of human biology, provides extensive discussion of such areas as paleoanthropology, primatology, and human variation. Also includes detailed theoretical examinations of topics within hominid evolution, the concept of race and sociobiology. Prerequisite: first year anthropology graduate student standing.

5030. Linguistic Anthropology. 3. Demonstrates interrelationships between language, human biology, and culture. In particular, the relevance of the study of language to biological anthropology, archaeology, and cultural anthropology is emphasized. Examines classic approaches in anthropological linguistics and recent controversies such as the origin of language in human evolution.

5110. Zooarchaeology I. 3. An introductory level seminar in the archaeological analysis of faunal materials. Emphasis is on the identification and curation of bones from archaeological and Late Pleistocene paleontological contexts, including their use in the interpretation of prehistoric and historic human behavior, the investigation of paleoenvironmental conditions and paleoecological relationships and problem-oriented taphonomic research. Dual listed with ANTH 4110. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

5111. Zooarchaeology II. 3. An advanced level seminar in the archeological analysis of faunal materials. Emphasis is on the study of bones as an integrated component of basic archaeological research, including their use in the investigation of paleoenvironmental conditions and paleoecological relationships as well as problem-oriented taphonomic research, and the interpretation of human behavior. Dual listed ANTH 4111. Prerequisite: ANTH 4110/5110.

5115. Lithic Analysis. 3. An overview of the analysis of stone tools and waste flakes from archaeological sites. Emphasizes appropriate use of typology and methods of debitage analysis. Dual listed with ANTH 4115. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300 and 9 additional hours in anthropology.5116. Advanced Lithic Analysis. 3. An in depth consideration of a single or limited range of topics in lithic analysis, or a group project focused on a case study. Dual listed with ANTH 4116. Prerequisite: ANTH 4115.

5120. North American Archaeology. 3. Studies North American prehistory from the earliest evidence to historical times. Dual listed with ANTH 4120. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300 or consent of instructor.

5125. Northwestern Plains Prehistory. 3. Covers the Northwestern Plains from the Paleo-Indian to historic contact, including relationships to surrounding areas. Dual listed with ANTH 4125. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

5130. Old World Archaeology. 3. Survey of the major archaeological sequences of the Old World. Dual listed with ANTH 4130. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

5135. Quantitative Methods in Anthropology. 3. A consideration of the use of quantitative methods in anthropological research, including descriptive and inferential statistics, pattern search, mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Dual listed with ANTH 4135. Prerequisites:  STAT 2070 or comparable course.

5150. Seminar in Prehistory. 1-3 (Max 9). Covers the prehistory of a specified region or time period within that region. emphasizes learning prehistoric sequences, material culture, and research questions associated with the topic. Topics include, but are not limited to, Paleoindian, Archaic, Siberian, Northern Plains, Great Basin, Rocky Mountain, or Southwestern Archaeology. Dual listed with ANTH 4150. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300.

5155. Computer Programming for Archaeologists. 3. Introduces the application of computer programming to the collection, management, and analysis (hypothesis testing) of archaeological data.  Develop models and simulations of complex prehistoric systems.   Begins with an introduction to Microsoft Excel (Visual Basic for Applications), programming structure, and applications to archaeology.  Specific assignments in writing programs relevant to typical archaeological problems. Dual listed with ANTH 4155. Prerequisites: ANTH 1300 or consent of instructor.

5160. GIS in Anthropology. 4. Introduction to how and why geographic information systems (GIS) are used in anthropology. Considers: 1) Background, definitions, and concepts of geographic data and GIS; 2) Anthropological and archaeological approaches to GIS; and 3) Hands-on experience with GIS applications in archaeology through demonstrations, lectures, and structured inquires. Dual listed with ANTH 4160. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or 1300.

5165. Advanced Archaeological Research. 3-6 (Max. 6). Intended for graduate students in archeology which will cover a wide range of topics in advanced research techniques. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5170. Geoarchaeology. 3. Introduces students to theory and method in geoarchaeological research. Emphasis is placed upon geomorphological processes of archaelogical site formation and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Dual listed with ANTH 4170. Prerequisite: ANTH 1300 or consent of instructor.

5180. Advanced Archaeological Field Studies. 6. Covers the entire archaeological process from project planning and budgeting to professional presentation of the results with an emphasis on field methods. Up to date field techniques with electronic data collection and analysis are introduced. Interdisciplinary philosophy is emphasized with lectures, demonstrations and hand-on experience. Prerequisite: graduate level students or upper level undergraduates with field school experience and consent of instructor.

5190. Public Archaeology. 3. A consideration of archaeological legislation, policies, and regulations; compliance, heritage, and avocational archaeology; cultural resource management; curation; and professional archaeological ethics. Dual listed with ANTH 4190. Prerequisites: ANTH 1300.

5210. Human Osteology. 3. Provides a detailed study of the human skeleton. Dual listed with ANTH 4210. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, LIFE 2022. (Normally offered spring semester)

5215. Evolution and Hominin Fossils. 3. Surveys hominin fossil record in context of evolutionary process, stressing structure-function and the dynamics of adaptive responses. Dual listed with ANTH 4215. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100. (Normally offered every third semester)

5220. Human Variation. 3. Studies age and sex differences, as well as race as a biological phenomenon. Includes origin and distribution of human races and the adaptive significance of racial traits. Dual listed with ANTH 4220. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100.

5230. Forensic Anthropology. 3. Introduces methods and purposes of physical anthropology as applied in human identification for law enforcement agencies. Dual listed with ANTH 4230. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100.

5240. Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. 2. Studies details of advanced osteometric procedures, particularly as applied to problems of human skeletal identification. Dual listed with ANTH 4240. Prerequisite: ANTH 4210.

5255. Bioarchaeology. 3. Study of the human skeleton in archaeological context to reveal the biological and cultural pasts of individuals and communities. Using case studies, covers the history of the field, ethics of working with human remains, theoretical and methodological approaches to mortuary archaeology. Gain hands-on experience by working with specimens from the UWyoming Human Remains Repository. Dual listed with ANTH 4255. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100 or 1300.

5260. Anthropology of Food, Culture, and Nutrition. 3. Offers a biocultural perspective to the study of diet, nutrition, subsistence, and food systems.  Study includes basic nutritional principles and diet seen in evolutionary, cross-cultural, ethnographic, and historical perspective; method and theory in nutritional anthropology; and contemporary issues in nutrition, cuisine, and foodways. Dual Listed with ANTH 4260. Prerequisites: ANTH 1100 or 1200.

5300. Anthropology of Religion. 3. Provides a comparative anthropological study of religious systems emphasizing analysis of symbolism, myth, and ritual. Dual listed with ANTH 4300. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5310. Environmental Anthropology. 3. Addresses how human societies interact with their surroundings, emphasizing cultural understandings of the environment. Introduces variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to topics ranging from problems of the American West to global environmental change. Cross listed with ENR 5310. Dual listed with ANTH 4310. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5315. Human Behavioral Ecology. 3. Examines the models and techniques of human behavioral ecology applied to hunter-gatherer societies; covers foraging, demography, life history, division of labor, sharing, and social inequality. Dual listed with ANTH 4315. Prerequisite: ANTH 1100, 1200, and 1300.

5320. Political Anthropology. 3. Encompasses theories and descriptions of relationships between power and society in both less formal tribal contexts and more highly structured political institutions.

5325. Symbolic Anthropology. 3. Teaches several anthropological approaches to symbolic and cultural analysis, while reading ethnographic examples of how symbolic analysis can be used to understand different cultures. Coursework assumes a basic knowledge of social science concepts. Dual listed with ANTH 4325. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or SOC 1000.

5340. Culture Change. 3. Examines representative theories of change, factors involved, dynamics of modernization and applied anthropology. Dual listed with ANTH 4340. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5350. Medical Anthropology. 3. Understandings of health and illness vary widely. Taking a comparative historical approach, this class examines how an individual's interactions with sociocultural and physical environments influence the experiences of health and illness. Topics include symbolic healing, biomedicine as a cultural system, disease and international development, and the global politics of AIDS and other pandemics. Dual listed with ANTH 4350. Prerequisites: ANTH 1200 or SOC 1000.

5360. Psychological Anthropology. 3. Introduces methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illness and cognition in non-western societies. Dual listed with ANTH 4360. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5380. Visual Anthropology. 3. Offers anthropological interpretation of visual representations and media, including analysis of the development of ethnographic films and their contemporary use. Visual representations of many cultures as well as mainstream United States examples are analyzed. Dual listed with ANTH 4380. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5390. Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology. 3. Introduces the graduate student to the research techniques used by cultural anthropologists. Students will conduct their own projects using participant-observation and interviewing. In-class discussion will be drawn on U.S. and international ethnographic examples. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5720. Advanced Linguistics. 3. Data are offered for analysis of morphological and syntactic materials from languages throughout the world. Attention is given to the limits within which these aspects of human language appear to vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 4750, ENGL 4750, LANG 4750.

5730. Field Techniques. 3. Students work directly with the speaker of an unwritten non-Indo-European language to learn techniques for eliciting the data requisite to begin a description of the language's structure. Identical to LANG 5310. Prerequisite: ANTH 5100 or LANG 5300.

5740. North American Language and Culture. 3. Demonstrates the interrelationship of language and culture in several Native American communities. Examines anthropological and linguistic theories regarding language spread and the peopling of North America, narrative performance, translation, and the connection between linguistic structures and cultural features. Dual listed with ANTH 4740 and AIST 4740. Prerequisite: ANTH 2000 or ANTH 4760.

5775. Language and Gender. 3. Investigates the relationship between language use, linguistic categories, and gender categories. Examines the linguistic practices involved in the formulation, discussion, and performance of gender categories in a number of different cultures. Dual listed with ANTH 4775; cross listed with WMST 5775. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200, 2000.

5795. Language Change. 3. Considers how languages change over time, due to both internal and external forces. The effects of language contact, borrowing, and structural change will be discussed. The use of linguistic data for questions of migration and cultural contact also will be explored. Dual listed with ANTH 4795. Prerequisites: ANTH 2000 and ANTH/ENGL/LANG 3750/4750.

5875. Graduate Practicum. 1-4 (Max. 6). Affords graduate students the opportunity to extend research projects in field or lab locations and receive additional credit for their work. Students sign up for these hours only in conjunction with another course and with the instructor's consent. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5880. Professionalism. 3. Provides an opportunity for the integration of graduate training and career choice. Examines issues of professionalism in the discipline ranging from ethical conduct to the research process and publication. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in anthropology.

5890. Teaching Anthropology. 3. Anthropology is increasingly relevant to many audiences. Provides practical insight and examination of controversial anthropological concepts - race, evolution, culture, etc., and how these may be taught to college or public audience. Also examines the teaching culture of anthropology as a discipline. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in anthropology.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3. (Max 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies:. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: Credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisites: enrolled in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 14). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrolled in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Share This Page:

Footer Navigation

University of Wyoming Medallion
 
1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071 // UW Operators (307) 766-1121 // Contact Us // Download Adobe Reader