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Botany (BOT)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

3000. Plant Form and Function. 4. Integration of basic vascular plant anatomy, morphology, physiology within the contexts of modern evolutionary and ecological theory. Students receive in depth exposure to fluid flow, energetics, development, growth, general metabolism, and structure, and functions for plant cells, tissue and organs. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023 or LIFE 2022 or equivalent; and minimum of 4 credits of college chemistry. (Normally offered spring semester)

3100. Plants and Civilization. 3. [C2, G1<>L] An overview of ways plants have and will continue to influence human civilizations. Botanical origins and socio-economic impacts of deforestation, plant fibers, stimulants, drugs and medicinals, wood products, foods and other plant-derived resources is discussed. Students write short papers building skills in research, critical thinking, argumentation, and citation strength. Prerequisite: LIFE 1000 or 1010. (Normally offered spring semester)

3150. Survey of Remote Sensing Applications. 3. Provides an introduction to remote sensing with a survey of applications in different fields. It includes a brief introduction to fundamentals of remote sensing and surveys applications of aerial photography, multi-and hyperspectral, active and thermal remote sensing, and global change remote sensing. Cross listed with GEOG 3150. Prerequisites: completion of a USP QA course and one science course with laboratory.

3600. Plant Diversity and Systematics. 4. A broad introduction to modern vascular plant systematics, with emphasis on identification, classification, nomenclature, speciation, adaptation, convergence, and phylogenetic methods.  Lab emphasizes learning major flowering plant families and genera, major invasive species, use of keys and manuals, and plant collection, with a Wyoming and Rocky Mountain focus. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023, or equivalent.

4001. Modeling the Earth System. 4. Takes a modeling approach to demonstrate how the Earth is integrated into an interconnected system through exchanges of energy and matter, and how Earth system functioning is susceptible to human alteration. Unifying concepts focus on quantitative interactions between the Earth and the Sun, and between the Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere. Cross listed with ATSC/ESS/GEOL. Prerequisites:  MATH 2205 or equivalent and [ESS 2000 or GEOL 2000].

4040 [G&R 4040]. Conservation of Natural Resources. 3. [C2, G1<>CS] Geographically analyzes conservation of natural and human resources, as well as political, social and ethical ramifications of our environmental policy. Cross listed with ENR/GEOL 4040.  Prerequisite: 6 hours of geography or ENR.

4100. Writing in Biological Sciences. 3. [W3<>WC, L] Writing intensive course, for zoology and physiology, biology and botany majors. Teaches students to write in the format of biological disciplines. Students must be concurrently enrolled in an upper-division 3-4 hours ZOO, BOT or LIFE course or have successfully completed such a class. Cross listed with ZOO 4100. Prerequisites: WA, WB and prior or concurrent registration for an upper division ZOO, BOT, LIFE course.

4111. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Combined lecture and laboratory course introduces students to the fundamentals of remote sensing with a strong emphasis on vegetation, land cover and environmental applications. Students learn to use digital spectral data to distinguish characteristics of the terrestrial biosphere important for ecological and land management applications. Dual listed with BOT 5111; cross listed with GEOG 4111. Prerequisites: QA and one science course with lab.

4130. Applied Remote Sensing for Agricultural Management. 3. Address principles and applications of remote sensing to crop and rangeland management.  Provides an overview of remote sensing concepts and applications pertaining to crops, shrubs and range vegetation.  In laboratory, students will learn to process remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring crop and rangelands. Cross listed with RNEW/AECL 4130; dual listed with BOT 5130. Prerequisites: QA course and 9 credit hours in student's major field and junior/senior standing.

4211. Advanced Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Includes lecture and laboratory. Specific topics include a review of remote sensing fundamentals and methods for using high spatial resolution data, hyperspectral data, active remote sensing, advanced image processing, advanced classification techniques and statistical techniques specific to exploring remotely sensed data. Cross listed with GEOG 4211; dual listed with BOT 5211. Prerequisite: BOT/GEOG/GEOL 4111.

4330. Cultivation of Edible Mushrooms. 3. An in-depth study of mushroom cultivation emphasizing a hands-on approach. Students learn about the history and biology of edible and medicinal mushrooms as well as about tissue culture, spawn generation techniques, substrate preparation, inoculation techniques, and strategies for maximizing yield. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023.

4420. Conservation Biology. 3. Addresses the broadest environmental issues facing society (habitat loss, invasion, overexploitation) and the mechanisms driving them, with particular attention to the Intermountain West. Through computer exercises, students also learn how to evaluate conservation efforts and make management recommendations. Cross listed with ENR/ZOO 4420. Prerequisites: LIFE 3400 and one of the following: ENR 3500, STAT 2050, or STAT 2070.

4550. Computational Biology. 4. Introduces concepts and skills that are generally applicable to computational analysis of biological questions. Content is motivated by applied projects that require basic computer programming for analysis. Two computer languages are introduced and utilized. Dual listed with BOT 5550. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or STAT 2050 or equivalent; LIFE 1010 or equivalent.

4640. Flora of the Rocky Mountains. 3. Field course. Acquaints students with the flora of the surrounding region. Emphasizes field identification and collection from plant communities encompassing a wide range of environments, such as grasslands, forests and alpine tundra. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023. (Normally offered summer session)

4664. Special Topics in Evolution. 1-4 (Max. 6). Advanced topics in evolutionary biology are engaged by studying primary research and topical synthesis in the current literature. Dual listed with BOT 5664. Prerequisite: LIFE 3500 or equivalent.

4680. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants. 4. A study of classification principles, nomenclature rules and systematic botany literature. Plants of the Rocky Mountain region are used primarily as examples, but the course gives a comprehensive view of the characteristics and relationships of the principal plants families. Dual listed with BOT 5680. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023. (Normally offered spring semester)

4700. Vegetation Ecology. 4. Reviews the ecology of major vegetation types, emphasizing patterns of vegetation distribution, vegetation-environment relationships, succession, the effect of fire and management decisions, and methods of vegetation analysis. Dual listed with BOT 5700. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400. (Normally offered fall semester)

4730. Plant Physiological Ecology. 4. Acquaints advanced students with environmental factors which affect the establishment and growth of plants. Emphasizes adaptive mechanisms. Dual listed with BOT 5730; cross listed with RNEW 4730. Prerequisites: one course in physiology and one course in ecology. (Normally offered spring semester)

4745. Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology. 3. Advanced course examines fundamental ecosystem functions and their relationship to ecosystem structure using a systems approach. We study cycles of carbon, water and nutrients through ecosystem components with an emphasis on interactions among plants, soil, and the atmosphere. Current readings focus on responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global climate change and human disturbance. Dual listed with BOT 5745; cross listed with ECOL 5745. Prerequisite: 1 course in ecology.

4775. Forest Ecology. 4. Integrative study of the structure, function, and ecological diversity of forested ecosystems, and the physical factors that influence this diversity, including emergent properties of energy flow and nutrient cycling. Special emphasis is given to understanding forest disturbances and succession, and implications for impacts of management and sustainability are discussed throughout. Dual listed with BOT 5775; cross listed with RNEW 4775. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400. (Normally offered fall semester of odd-numbered years)

4780. Biogeochemistry. 4. A comprehensive treatment of biogeochemistry with emphasis on biogenic elements and biological processes. Reviews occurrence of elements, their behavior in the biosphere, and how their cycles are affected by humans. Dual listed with BOT 5780. Prerequisite: a course in organic chemistry.

4790 [4710]. Special Topics in Ecology. 1‑3 (Max. 6). Acquaints students with various topics not covered in regular courses. Emphasizes recent developments appearing in journal literature. Dual listed with BOT 5790. Prerequisite: two courses in ecology. (Normally offered both semesters)

4965. Undergraduate Research in Botany. 1-10 (Max. 10). Undergraduate research or study in botany done under the guidance of a Botany Faculty Member. Encouraged to present their research at local, regional, or national scientific meetings, and, when appropriate, submit a manuscript for publication. Prerequisites: LIFE 2023, undergraduate status in good academic standing; consent of a botany faculty research mentor. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4970. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 12). Provides undergraduate students with academic credit for approved work experiences in the fields of botany and biology. Must be arranged in consultation with a botany faculty member and the work supervisor. Offered S/U only. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 3.0 GPA, declared major in botany or biology, and approval by a botany faculty member and work supervisor.

5000. Graduate Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 6). Selected topics on current research in the botanical sciences. Offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: 15 hours of botany or biology.

5060. Fundamental Concepts in Evolution. 3. Explores fundamental concepts in evolutionary biology including evolutionary ecology, population genetics, and speciation with an emphasis on both theoretical frameworks and practical applications. Discussion included. Cross listed with ECOL/ZOO 5060. Prerequisite: graduate student in good standing.

5111. Remote Sensing. 4. Introduces students to the fundamentals of remote sensing with a strong emphasis on vegetation, land cover and environmental applications. Students learn to use digital spectral data to distinguish characteristics of the terrestrial biosphere important for ecological and land management applications. Dual listed with BOT 4111; cross listed with GEOG 4111/5111. Prerequisites: QA and one science course with laboratory.

5130. Applied Remote Sensing for Agricultural Management. 3. Address principles and applications of remote sensing to crop and rangeland management.  Provides an overview of remote sensing concepts and applications pertaining to crops, shrubs and range vegetation.  In laboratory, students will learn to process remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring crop and rangelands. Dual listed with BOT 4130; cross listed with RNEW 5130. Prerequisites: QA course and 9 credit hours in student's major field and junior/senior standing.

5150. Research in Remote Sensing. 1-6 (Max. 6). Independent research into problems on the remote sensing of vegetation using satellite technology. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5211. Advanced Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Includes lecture and laboratory. Specific topics include a review of remote sensing fundamentals and methods for using high spatial resolution data, hyperspectral data, active remote sensing, advanced image processing, advanced classification techniques and statistical techniques specific to exploring remotely sensed data. Dual listed with BOT 4211; cross listed with GEOG 5211. Prerequisite: BOT/GEOG 4111.

5320. Research in Mycology. 1-3 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

5420. Research in Physiology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5480. Spatial Information Sciences Seminar. 1. There are many earth science technologies, remote sensing, GIS and GPS. Synergism among these technologies increase the range of solutions for research and management. This course is a forum for presentation of these solutions or questions requiring solutions. Cross listed with GEOL 5480. Prerequisite: a course in remote sensing, GIS, GPS, and graduate standing.

5550. Computational Biology. 4. Introduces concepts and skills that are generally applicable to computational analysis of biological questions. Content is motivated by applied projects that require basic computer programming for analysis. Two computer languages are introduced and utilized. Dual listed with BOT 4550. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 or STAT 2050 or equivalent; LIFE 1010 or equivalent.

5610. Research in the Taxonomy of Vascular Plants. 1-6 (Max. 6). The University of Wyoming is especially well equipped for research on the classification of native plants. The Rocky Mountain Herbarium offers an abundance of material for study and the library is especially rich in taxonomic literature. Monographic work may be done on an assigned genus or on the plants of a limited area. Cytological, anatomical, and biochemical techniques may be employed in the solution of certain problems. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5650. Readings in Plant Systematics. 1 (Max. 6). Centered on readings involving selected topics in the current plant systematics literature. Prerequisite: BOT 4680.

5660. Plant Evolution. 2. Designed to acquaint graduate students with theories concerning the processes of plant evolution. Prerequisite: LIFE 3050.

5664. Topics: Evolution. 1-4 (Max. 12). Advanced topics in evolutionary biology are engaged by studying primary research and topical syntheses in the current literature. Dual listed with BOT 4664. Prerequisite: LIFE 3500 or equivalent.

5665. Research in Evolutionary Biology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5670. Phylogeny of Flowering Plants. 2. Covers trends in the evolution of flowering plants. Prerequisite: BOT 4680.

5680. Plant Taxonomy. 4. Detailed work in the principles of classification, rules of nomenclature, and literature of systematic botany. The plants of the Rocky Mountain region are used primarily as examples, but the course gives a comprehensive view of the characteristics and relationships of the principal families of vascular plants. Dual listed with BOT 4680. Prerequisite: LIFE 2023.

5690. Special Topics in Systematics. 1-4 (Max. 12). Designed to acquaint students with various topics not covered in regular courses. Emphasis is placed on recent developments in the journal literature. Prerequisite: BOT 4680 or 5680 or equivalent.

5700. Vegetation Ecology. 4. The ecology of major vegetation types, with emphasis on patterns of vegetation distribution, vegetation-environment relationships, succession, the effect of fire and management decisions, and methods of vegetation analysis. Dual listed with BOT 4700. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400.

5710. Research in Ecology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5720. Research in Physiological Ecology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5730. Plant Physiological Ecology. 4. Acquaints advanced students with environmental factors which affect the establishment and growth of plants. Emphasizes adaptive mechanisms. Lecture with inclusive hands-on laboratory. Dual listed with BOT 4730; cross listed with RNEW 5730. Prerequisite: one course in ecology and one in physiology.

5745. Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology. 3. Advanced course examines fundamental ecosystem functions and their relationship to ecosystem structure using a systems approach. Study cycles of carbon, water and nutrients through ecosystem components with an emphasis on interactions among plants, soil, and the atmosphere. Current readings focus on responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global climate change an human disturbance. Dual listed with BOT 4745; cross listed with ECOL 5745. Prerequisite: one course in ecology.

5750. Seminar in Ecophysiology. 1-3 (Max. 8). Prerequisite: 1 course in physiology and 1 course in ecology.

5775. Forest Ecology. 4. Integrative study of the structure, function, and ecological diversity of forested ecosystems, and the physical factors that influence this diversity, including emergent properties of energy flow and nutrient cycling. Special emphasis is given to understanding forest disturbances and succession, and implications for impacts of management and sustainability are discussed throughout. Dual listed with BOT 4775; cross listed with ECOL/RNEW 5775. Prerequisites: LIFE 3400.

5780. Biogeochemistry. 4. A comprehensive treatment of biogeochemistry with emphasis on biogenic elements and biological processes. Reviews occurrence of elements, their behavior in the biosphere, and how their cycles are affected by humans. Dual listed with BOT 4780. Prerequisites: a course in organic chemistry.

5790. Special Topics in Ecology. 1-3 (Max. 6). Designed to acquaint advanced students with various topics not covered in other courses. Emphasis is placed on recent developments appearing in the journal literature. Dual listed with BOT 4790. Prerequisite: two courses in ecology.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1 - 3. (Max 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrolled in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrolled in a graduate level degree program.

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