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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Environment and Natural Resources (ENR)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1000. Energy and Society. 3. Introduces humans' past, present, and future sources of energy and their advantages and limitations. Discusses society's current, non-sustainable pattern of energy use from a supply and environmental perspective. Investigates the technical, environmental, political, and societal problems associated with the eventual conversion to renewable energy resources. Cross listed with ERS 1000. Prerequisites: none.

1100. Environment and Natural Resource Problems and Policies. 2. [F1<>I, L] Survey of environment and natural resources issues and policies at local/regional, national, and global scales. Students are challenged to think critically as they dissect the causes, complexities, and solutions of contemporary, interdisciplinary environmental and natural resource challenges. Prerequisites: none.

1200. Environment. 4. [(none)<>SB] Introductory environmental science course appropriate for science and nonscience majors. Uses cases studies and applied laboratories to explore core biological principles such as nutrient flow and cycling, population and community ecology, and ecosystem structure and function, as well as the non-science dimensions of ENR issues. Early-semester, weekend field trips/labs required. Prerequisites: none.

1300. Foundations of Sustainability. 3. Examine the basic concepts, theories, and practice of sustainability as a foundation for future learning in the field. Explore principles of sustainability in our community and personal lives through various lenses and systems. Prerequisites: none.

1400. Biodiversity: Science and Society. 3. [I, L]. Biodiversity lays the foundation for nature’s ability to properly function. In turn humans depend on a healthy-functioning natural system. Adequate biodiversity provides us with many things including new genetic material for agriculture, medical discoveries, recreational opportunities and good mental health. This course will examine key themes in our understanding of biodiversity. Students enrolled in this course will have a better understanding of issues, challenges and potential solutions to our current biodiversity crisis. Course meetings will largely consist of group discussions of assigned readings. Discussions will focus on critically evaluating and analyzing information, hypotheses and knowledge that arise from the readings. Writing assignments will emphasize succinct but thorough interpretation of information, policy, conservation and societal impacts of biodiversity.

1500. Water, Dirt, and Earth's Environment. 4. [(none)<>SE] Introductory environmental geology course focusing on water and soil both as hazards and as life-sustaining resources. Explores surface processes and climate change over geological and human timescales. Case studies illustrate the environmental tradeoffs of resource use. Cross listed with GEOL 1500. Prerequisites: none.

2000. Environment and Society. 3. [W2, C2, G1<>G] Develops understanding of the nature and dimensions of environmental and natural resource issues. Explores ways in which elements of society approach, evaluate, and develop positions relative to environmental issues. Uses case studies to illustrate the contemporary and historical role of individuals and societies in identifying and addressing environmental issues at scales ranging from local to global.

2100 [BOT 2100]. Forest Management. 3. Principles of forest management. Topics include the laws affecting forest management, methods of harvesting wood from forests, fire and insect management, the effects of disturbances on stream flow and nutrient cycling, and the challenges of developing management plans for forests. Cross listed with RNEW 2100. Prerequisites: LIFE 1001 or 1010.

2330. Environmental Ethics. 3. [C1<>CH] Introduces students to ethical theory in environmental problem cases, and to philosophical issues in environmental philosophy. Ethical theories include natural law, utilitarianism, deontological and rights-based theories, relativism. Topics may include: conservation/preservation, resource management, pollution, overpopulation, factory farming, Leopold's land ethic, deep ecology, holism, eco-feminism. Cross listed with PHIL 2330.

2345. Natural Resource Ethics. 3. [(none)<>CH, D] Introduces students to ethics in context of natural resource extraction, use, conservation, preservation, and distribution. Ethical frameworks include teleological and deontological theories primarily applied to human needs and wants. Concepts and applications of environmental justice are addressed, including private property, sustainability, and obligations to future generations.  Cross listed with PHIL/RNEW 2345. Prerequisites: none.

2450. Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management. 3. Emphasizes principles of habitat and population biology and management, human dimensions of wildlife management, as well as law and policy. Cross listed with ZOO 2450. Prerequisites: LIFE 1010 and 2020. (Offered spring semester)

2800. Introduction to Outdoor Leadership. 2. Designed to increase knowledge and competencies related to leading others in the outdoors. Significant focus is on self-awareness, judgment, and decision-making. The specific skills and theories students learn throughout provide a foundation for other leadership endeavors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

3000 [4000]. Approaches to ENR Problem Solving. 3. [M3<> CS,WB] Provides an introduction to environmental and natural resources problem solving and decision making.  Students learn how scholars and practitioners define and structure ENR problems for management and policy decision making. Additionally, students learn approaches, processes and techniques that address problems analytically and in a values-oriented context. Prerequisite: ENR 2000.

3050. Cultures of Nature in the United States 3. [C1, W2<>(none)] Uses artistic, philosophical, historical and literary material to investigate how ideas about and representations of nature have changed over time in the U.S. Culminates in an examination of a wide range of contemporary environmental ideas within this broad historical and cultural context. Cross listed with AMST/WMST 3050. Prerequisite: 2000-level course in one of the following departments: AMST, American history, American literature, or a 2000-level course approved for the ENR program.

3100. Principles of Wildland Water Quality. 3. Basic principles of aquatic chemistry and water quality as they relate to watershed management practices including livestock production, agronomic production, mineral and natural gas extraction and other land uses. Cross listed with REWM 3100. Prerequisite: CHEM 1000. (Normally offered fall semester)

3130. Environmental Quality. 3. Introduction to environmental quality issues and events. Course emphasizes impacts to soil, water, atmospheric, and vegetative ecosystems due to different nutrients and contaminants, including nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, trace elements, and organic chemicals. Current information pertaining to environmental quality is discussed and a field trip to the Union Pacific Tie Plant. Cross listed with SOIL 3130. Prerequisite: complete at least 1 University Studies Science course SB, SP or SE. (Offered fall semester)

3450 [G&R 3450]. Weather and Climate. 3. Systematically examines elements and controls of weather and climate with application to regions. Cross listed with GEOG 3450. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000, 1010 or 1020. (Normally offered fall semester)

3620. Environmental Justice. 3. Examines core philosophical understandings of justice and applies them to the environment through a variety of case studies, analytical essays and monographs. Cross-listed with POLS 3620. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

3700. Wyoming Conservation Corps Practicum. 1-2. Required for students entering the WCC. Students will be required to make weekly journal entries and write a paper on a topic germane to their WCC experience. Additionally, necessary training for the Wyoming Conservation Corps program will be included in the course content. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Wyoming Conservation Corps program.

3750 [4750]. Natural Resource Planning and Economics. 3. Economic concepts and rudimentary analytical tools are applied to federal, state and local natural resource planning and management programs. The value of economic input into natural resource policy is examined. Evaluating tradeoffs and resolving conflicts play a particularly important role in the course content. Cross listed with AGEC 3750. Prerequisites: QA, WA and junior standing. (Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years)

3900. Seminar in Environment and Natural Resources. 1-3 (max. 3). Examines research and policy perspectives by a variety of authorities on selected environment and natural resource problems and issues. Prerequisite: ENR 3000 or consent of instructor.

3950. Environmental Sociology. 3. Explores how ecology, technology, politics, economics, and culture intersect. By analyzing key contemporary environmental debates, students will develop an understanding of sociological analyses, and the impact of social life on our environment, as well as the effect of the environment on social life. Topics covered include: the environmental movement; sustainable development; developing nations and their environment; capitalism and technology; and environmental justice. Cross listed with SOC 3950. Prerequisite: SOC 1000.

4030. Ecology of Knowledge. 3. Examines the development of "disciplines" and explores definitions, theories, methods and practices of interdisciplinary work. Cross listed with AMST 4030. Dual listed with ENR 5030. Prerequisite: 3 hours in any interdisciplinary program.

4040 [G&R 4040]. Conservation of Natural Resources. 3. [C2, G1<>CS] Geographically analyzes conservation of natural and human resources, as well as political, social and ethical ramifications of our environmental policy. Cross listed with BOT/GEOG 4040.  Prerequisite: 6 hours of geography or ENR.

4051. Environmental Politics. 3. [C2, W3<>WC] Analyzes environmentalism as a political phenomenon. Provides students with a basic understanding of how to analyze political issues by: (1) examining the historical and contemporary issues that produce controversy over environmental matters; and (2) surveying the impacts of these issues on the formulation and implementation of laws, policies, and regulations. Cross listed with POLS, AMST, GEOG and REWM 4051. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4052. Federal Land Politics. 3. Examines the political forces that have shaped and continue to shape federal land policy and management. Explores the interactions between democratic decision making and science in the management of federal lands. Surveys the sources of controversy over federal land management and methods for harmonizing public demands with technical expertise. Cross listed with POLS/AMST/GEOG/REWM 4052. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4285. Wildland Hydrology. 3. Teaches essential and unique characteristics of hydrologic cycle as occurred on range and forest lands, concentrating on quantification of these processes and storages. Cross listed with REWM 4285. Dual listed with ENR 5285.  Prerequisite: QA (Normally offered fall semester of even-numbered years)

4310. Environmental Anthropology. 3. Addresses how human societies interact with their surroundings, emphasizing cultural understandings of the environment. Introduces variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to topics ranging from problems of the American West to global environmental change. Cross listed with ANTH 4310. Dual listed with ENR 5310. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200. (Normally offered every third semester)

4420. Conservation Biology. 3. Addresses the broadest environmental issues facing society (habitat loss, invasion, overexploitation) and the mechanisms driving them, with particular attention to the Intermountain West. Through computer exercises, students also learn how to evaluate conservation efforts and make management recommendations. Cross listed with BOT/ZOO 4420. Prerequisites: LIFE 3400 and one of the following: ENR 3500, STAT 2050, or STAT 2070.

4450. Negotiation. 3. Examines how to use negotiation to resolve conflict and get agreement. Describes conflict; outlines ways to address conflict; examines different negotiation strategies and the impact of cognitive bias, power, ethics, and individual and cultural differences; and explores mediation practices. Students complete negotiations, role-plays, and questionnaires. Cross listed with AGEC 4450. Dual listed with ENR 5450. Prerequisite: Completion of USP O requirement; junior standing.

4500. Risk Analysis. 3. Introduces basic concepts of risk analysis, including risk perception, identification, assessment, communication, management, and policy.  Provides quantitative treatment of risk assessment procedures, fundamental mathematical models, and the concepts of variability and uncertainty; and practical experience in risk analyses conducted by teams of students.  Emphasizes environment and natural resource examples.  Prerequisites: MATH 1000 or 1400, introductory statistics and familiarity with Excel spreadsheets; or consent of instructor.

4501. Risk Analysis Computer Laboratory. 1. Laboratory section in which students use computer software to apply Monte Carlo analysis and Decision Analysis to environmental case studies. Laboratory section facilitates application of principles of risk analysis in decision-making presented in lecture in ENR 4500. Dual listed with ENR 5501. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENR 4500/5500.

4550 [4700]. Negotiation Analysis. 3. Focuses on using an analytical perspective for maximizing joint gains between negotiators. Students learn analytical techniques to prepare for negotiation, evaluate options and proposals during a negotiation, and evaluate negotiated outcomes with respect to maximization of joint gains and fairness criteria. Dual listed with ENR 5550; Cross listed with AGEC 4550. Prerequisite: QA.

4600. Campus Sustainability. 3. Uses campus as a setting to explore long-term environmental, economic, and social sustainability theory and practice. Students design and implement a semester-long project to improve sustainability of the UW campus. This interdisciplinary course is appropriate for students of all disciplines. Dual listed with ENR 5600; cross listed with MKT 4600. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing.

4750. ENR Law and Policy. 3. Explores the policy underpinnings of environmental and natural resource issues and the legal responses to these problems.  Students will gain a basic understanding of: (1) the causes of environmental problems, including energy, water, wildlife, and other western land use issues; (2) the range of policy and instrument choices; and (3) the approaches actually taken in current laws.  Students also will apply the law in an interdisciplinary, problem-based learning context. Dual listed with ENR 5750. Prerequisites: ENR 2000 and upper division standing or permission of instructor.

4800. Historic Preservation. 3. Review of the roots of historic preservation in Western culture with an emphasis on the historical and legal context of architectural conservation in America. Current issues in preservation are examined through case studies and guest presentations. Cross listed with AMST 4800. Dual listed with ENR 5800. Prerequisite: ARE 3020 or AMST 5400.

4890 [4990]. Topics in Environment and Natural Resources. 1-3. (Max. 12). Special topics in environment and natural resources are offered under this number. The specific subject matter varies each year because the course is normally taught by faculty who wish to present a specialized topic of interest to ENR and other students. Check class schedule for specific topics offered each year. Dual listed with ENR 5890.  Prerequisites: ENR 3000 or permission of the instructor.

4900. Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Practice. 3. [C2, W3<>WC] Encompasses student resolution in multidisciplinary teams of environment and natural resource problems and issues; practice in formulating policy alternatives; case studies; planning, performing and coordinating multidisciplinary research. Prerequisites: ENR 3000 and 3900; or consent of instructor.

4950. Leadership in Natural Resources Management. 2. Provides Crew Leaders in the Wyoming Conservation Corps with an understanding of the complex dynamics of natural resources management while also equipping students with the tools to confidently lead groups of students on conservation-oriented service-learning projects on Wyoming's public lands during the summer months. Dual listed with ENR 5950; cross listed with ERS 4950. Prerequisites: ENR 3700 and consent of instructor.

4970. ENR Internship. 1-6.0 (Max. 6). Provides practical experience in environmental and natural resource policy, management and decision processes, as well as interaction with professionals in the field. Offered S/U only Prerequisites: ENR 3000 and 3900.

5000. Approaches to Environment and Natural Resources Problem-Solving. 3. Explores important environmental policy, collaborative and adaptive decision-making and the integration of diverse disciplines in the study and resolution of complex ENR challenges. This is the first course in the ENR Capstone series (along with ENR 4900) and the students should take both capstone courses in the same academic year. Dual listed with ENR 4000. Prerequisite: USP WA course.

5030. Ecology of Knowledge. 3. Examines the development of "disciplines" and explores definitions, theories, methods and practices of interdisciplinary work. Cross listed with AMST 5030. Dual listed with ENR 4030. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5050. Techniques in Environmental Data Management. 4. Centers on the role of information technology in support of scientific research. Through integration of multiple software packages (e.g. Relational databases, ProgramR and ArcGIS), proven database designs, and SQL scripting,  increased efficiency and utility will occur during data analyses. These information science principles are demonstrated using project-based examples. Cross listed with GEOG/ECOL 5050. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5285. Wildland Hydrology. 3. Teaches essential and unique characteristics of hydrologic cycle as occurred on range and forest lands, concentrating on quantification of these processes and storages. Cross listed with REWM 5285. Dual listed with ENR 4285.  Prerequisite: QA (Normally offered fall semester of even-numbered years)

5310. Environmental Anthropology. 3. Addresses how human societies interact with their surroundings, emphasizing cultural understandings of the environment. Introduces variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to topics ranging from problems of the American West to global environmental change. Cross listed with ANTH 5310. Dual listed with ENR 4310. Prerequisite: ANTH 1200.

5450. Negotiation. 3. Examines how to use negotiation to resolve conflict and get agreement. Describes conflict; outlines ways to address conflict; examines different negotiation strategies and the impact of cognitive bias, power, ethics, and individual and cultural differences; and explores mediation practices. Students complete negotiations, role-plays, and questionnaires. Cross listed with AGEC 5450. Dual listed with ENR 4450. Prerequisite: Completion of USP O requirement; junior standing.

5500. Risk Analysis. 3. Introduces basic concepts of risk analysis, including risk perception, identification, assessment, communication, management, and policy. Provides quantitative treatment of risk assessment procedures, fundamental mathematical models, and the concepts of variability and uncertainty; and practical experience in risk analyses conducted by teams of students. Emphasizes environment and natural resource examples. Prerequisites: MATH 1000 or 1400, introductory statistics and familiarity with Excel spreadsheets.

5501. Risk Analysis Computer Laboratory. 1. Laboratory section in which students use computer software to apply Monte Carlo analysis and Decision Analysis to environmental case studies. Laboratory section facilitates application of principles of risk analysis in decision-making presented in lecture in ENR 5500. Dual listed with ENR 4501. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENR 4500/5500.

5550 [5700]. Negotiation Analysis. 3. Focuses on using an analytical perspective for maximizing joint gains between negotiators. Students learn analytical techniques to prepare for negotiation, evaluate options and proposals during a negotiation, and evaluate negotiated outcomes with respect to maximization of joint gains and fairness criteria. Dual listed with ENR 4550; Cross listed with AGEC 5550. Prerequisite: QA.

5600. Campus Sustainability. 3. Uses campus as a setting to explore long-term environmental, economic, and social sustainability theory and practice. Students design and implement a semester-long project to improve sustainability of the UW campus. This is an interdisciplinary course and is appropriate for students of all disciplines. Dual listed with ENR 4600; cross listed with MKT 5600. Prerequisites: USP WB course.

5750. ENR Law and Policy. 3. Explores the policy underpinnings of environmental and natural resource issues and the legal responses to these problems.  Students will gain a basic understanding of: (1) the causes of environmental problems, including energy, water, wildlife, and other western land use issues; (2) the range of policy and instrument choices; and (3) the approaches actually taken in current laws.  Students also will apply the law in an interdisciplinary, problem-based learning context. Dual listed with ENR 4750. Prerequisites: ENR 2000 and upper division standing or permission of instructor.

5800. Historic Preservation. 3. Review of the roots of historic preservation in Western culture with an emphasis on the historical and legal context of architectural conservation in America. Current issues in preservation are examined through case studies and guest presentations. Cross listed with AMST 5800. Dual listed with ENR 4800. Prerequisite: ARE 3020 or AMST 5400.

5890. Topics in Environment and Natural Resources. 1-6 (Max. 12). Special topics in environment and natural resources are offered under this number. The specific subject matter varies each year because the course is normally taught by faculty who wish to present a specialized topic of interest to ENR and other students. Check class schedule for specific topics offered each year. Dual listed with ENR 4890. Prerequisite: ENR 5000 or consent of instructor.

5900. Solving Multidisciplinary Problems in ENR. 3. Participation in a multidisciplinary research team to solve a real or simulated problem in environment and natural resources. Dual listed with ENR 4900. Prerequisites: graduate standing and ENR 5000.

5950. Leadership in Natural Resources Management. 2. Provides Crew Leaders in the Wyoming Conservation Corps with an understanding of the complex dynamics of natural resources management while also equipping students with the tools to confidently lead groups of students on conservation-oriented service-learning projects on Wyoming's public lands during the summer months. Dual listed with ENR 5950; cross listed with ERS 5950. Prerequisites: ENR 3700 and consent of instructor.

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