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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

History (HIST)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1010. Introduction to History: Encounters with Difference. 3. [(none)<>I] Introduces students to history as a discipline with a focus on the ways Americans have understood and dealt with the diverse nature of a society. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

1110. Western Civilization I. 3. [C1, G1<>CH] Surveys basics of Western European civilization from decline of Roman Empire to 1700. (No credit given for students who have taken HIST 2100.) (Normally offered fall semester)

1120. Western Civilization II. 3. [G1<>(none)] A broad survey of European history in the Western tradition from 1700 to present. (No credit given for students who have taken HIST 2110.) (Normally offered spring semester)

1210. United States History I. 3. [V2, C2<>(none)] Surveys U.S. history 1607-1865. Together with HIST 1220, it is the foundation on which all U.S. history courses offered by the department are based. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1210 and 1211. (Offered each semester)

1211. U.S. to 1865. 3. [V1<>V] Surveys U.S. history through the Civil War which by itself meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing for instruction in the provisions and principles of the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1210 and 1211. (Offered each semester)

1220. United States History II. 3. [C2<>(none)] Surveys U.S. history from reconstruction to recent past. Together with HIST 1210, it is the foundation for all U.S. history courses offered by the department. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1220 and 1221. (Offered spring semester and based on sufficient demand and resources)

1221. U.S. From 1865. 3. [V1<>V] Surveys U.S. history from the Civil War to the present and meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing for instruction in the provisions and principles of the constitutions of the U.S. and of Wyoming. Students cannot receive credit for both 1220 and 1221. (Offered spring semester and based on sufficient demand and resources)

1250. History of Wyoming. 3. [V3<>(none)] A study of Wyoming from its beginning to the present. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1250 and 1251. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

1251. Wyoming History. 3. [V1<>V] A survey which encourages an understanding of Wyoming history, how it relates to the history of the West and the rest of America and how it has influenced the present. An important component is to learn about the U.S. and the Wyoming constitutions and how these two documents have influenced Wyoming history. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1250 and 1251.

1290. History of the U.S. West. 3. [C2<>(none)] An introductory survey of the American West, with consideration of developments in both the 19th and 20th centuries. (Normally offered fall semester)

1320. World Civilization to 1450. 3. [C2, G1<>CS] A history of the world's peoples and civilizations from human prehistory to 1450, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

1330. World Civilizations from 1450. 3. [C2, G1<>G] A history of the world's peoples and civilizations from 1450 to the present, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

2020. American Military History. 3. Surveys military experiences of U.S. from colonial period to the present. In addition to specific wars, examines military doctrines and political, social and economic forces that shaped conduct of war in American history. (Normally offered spring semester)

2040. Imperial China. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Surveys China's social, intellectual, political, cultural, technological and ethnohistory from earliest historical period through the last imperial dynasty, and China's role in greater E. Asian and world history. Provides background for other Asia-related courses, and is part of year-long series; see HIST 2041. Prerequisite: 3 hours of history. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2041. Modern China. 3. Surveys China's social, intellectual, political, cultural and ethnohistory from mid-1800s to the present. Themes include colonialism, emergence of nation-state, Communist party, Mao's socio-political agenda, post-Mao reforms and China's role in Asia. Background for other Asia-related courses and part of year-long series; see HIST 2040. Prerequisites: 3 hours in history. (Offered once every other year)

2050. Introduction to Public History. 3. Introduces the student to the non-teaching, professional uses of history. Topics for consideration include archival work, museum management, public information and publications, historic site development, oral history interviewing, preparation of government reports, historic preservation general concepts and historical programming. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or consent of instructor.

2060. Topics in History. 2-3 (Max. 6). Discusses special topics that fall outside traditional chronological and geographical framework of history; content varies from semester to semester in accordance with faculty interest and student demand. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2080 [4315]. Holocaust. 3. [C2<>CH] Survey of the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945. Cross listed with RELI 2080. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

2105. Medieval Europe in Film. 3. [C3<>(none)] Historical depictions in films help to shape people's view of the past. Uses commercial films to study major themes in the development of western European civilization between 500 and 1500. Students view, discuss and write about films, learning to evaluate films historically and to view films critically, developing media literacy.

2120. Ancient Greece and the Near East. 3. [C1, G1<>(none)] Examines development of civilization in Eastern Mediterranean from pre-history to Alexander the Great. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2130. Ancient Rome. 3. [C1, G1<>(none)] Studies history of the growth of Roman power from city-state to world power. (Normally offered spring semester)

2225. History of Christianity. 3. [C1<>(none)] Traces Christianity from its beginnings to late 20th century. Cross listed with RELI 2225.

2230. The History of Russia to 1855. 3. [C2, G1<>CS] General survey of modern Russian history from earliest times to 1855. (Normally offered fall semester)

2240. The History of Russia Since 1855. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] General survey of modern Russian history from 1855 to the present. (Normally offered spring semester)

2250. American Religious History I (To 1865). 3. [(none)<>CH, D] Traces the history of religion in America through the Civil War. We will pay particular attention to the intertwining of religion and colonialism; the tension between emerging Protestant hegemony and religious pluralism; and the roles religion has played in justifying oppression and pursuing liberty in American history. Cross listed with RELI 2250. Prerequisites: none.

2252. American Religious History II (1865-1945). 3. [(none)<>CH, D] Traces American religious history from the Civil War through WWII. Focuses on how race/ethnicity, class, gender, and national origin affected religion, and explores how Americans used religion in oppressing and liberating people; marking and erasing difference; and exporting values abroad as well as reforming society at home. Cross listed with RELI 2252. Prerequisites: none.

2290. History of North American Indians. 3. [C1<>CH, D] Studies American Indian history through 500 years and across the continent. Considers Indian political, social and economic continuity and change. Focuses on how Indian peoples experienced and responded to times of dramatic change. Cross listed with AIST 2290. (Normally offered spring semester)

2315. History of Non-Western Religions. 3. [(none)<>CH, G] Introduces students to religions outside the Judeo-Christian realm familiar in the west. Each religion analyzed in its world views, its ways of life, and in its social organization. History of each religion and its changes. Cross listed with RELI 2315. Prerequisites: none.

2320. History of Islam. 3. [(none)<>CH, G] Focuses on the origins of Islam and its early formation, its growth and spread across the world, and its intellectual, spiritual and historical character. Time will also be spent on the formation of Islam in the modern world and how that impacts the views and actions of its members. Prerequisites: none.

2360. African-American History. 3. Surveys African-American history in America, particularly emphasizing issues of identity, class, and progress as well as exploring African-Americans' quest for full participation in American life. Cross listed with AAST 2360. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2370. Chicano History: Origins to 1900. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, D] General survey of the history of the Mexican American Chicano people in the United States. Examines the origins and development of Mexican Americans, Chicanos through the major historical processes which have shaped their experience. Major themes include multicultural, multiethnic context, origins; changing identity, comparative relations to other social, ethnic groups, culture, social structure, politics, economy, immigration, and the influence of United States-Mexico relations. Cross listed with CHST 2370.

2380. Latin American Civilization. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] An intensive course on the 20th century. Explores relations with U.S., dependency theory, church-state relations, uses of land and other natural resources, social groups, attempts to reform society and why they have failed or succeeded. Emphasizes historical development of contemporary issues and problems. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2385. Chicano History : 1900 to Present. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] General survey of the history of the Mexican American Chicano people in the United States. Examines the origins and development of Mexican Americans, Chicanos through the major historical processes which have shaped their experience. Major themes include multicultural, multiethnic context, origins; changing identity, comparative relations to other social, ethnic groups, culture, social structure, politics, economy, immigration, and the influence of United States-Mexico relations. Cross listed with CHST 2385.

2389. History of Women in the American West. 3. [(none)<>D] Surveys the roots of society's marginal historical depiction of women in the American West from the colonial period through the twentieth century. From the perspective of race, class, ethnicity, and gender, the course focuses on the development of a multi-dimensional understanding of women's roles using an interdisciplinary approach. Cross listed with WMST 2389. Prerequisites: none.

2460. Traditional Japan. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Surveys Japan's social, intellectual, political, cultural, technological and ethnohistory from earliest historical period to the 1800s. Topics include roles of China and Korea, the samurai warrior tradition, family structure, Buddhism and Shinto. Provides background for other Asia-related courses, and is part of a year-long series; see HIST 2461. Prerequisite: 3 hours of history.

2461. Modern Japan. 3. Surveys Japan's social, intellectual, political, cultural, economic, technological and ethnohistory from the 1800s through the present. Topics include Japan's industrialization, Asian colonialism, post-WWII and Japan as economic superpower. Provides background for other Asia-related courses and is part of a year-long series; see HIST 2460. Prerequisites: 3 hours in history. (Offered once every other year)

2470. Civilization of India. 3-4 (Max. 4). [C2, G1<>(none)] Surveys Indian civilization from earliest times, including cultural aspects. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2500. The Impact of the Union Pacific on Wyoming History. [W2, C2<>(none)] Students experience and interpret the impact of the building of the Union Pacific Railroad on the history and culture of Wyoming through the lens of three disciplinary perspectives. Students explore how the railroad impacted Wyoming geography, economic development and the people of the state through personal research projects. Cross listed with ECON 2500.

2700. Introduction to Museology. 3. [(none)<>CH] Explores the historical, cultural, and contemporary roles of museums and preservation institutions in society. Introduces students to the museum professions, collection and exhibition installation strategies, and ethical problems of governance and collection. Field trips to regional collections are included. Cross listed with AMST/ANTH/ART 2700. Prerequisite: WA.

3000. Plains Culture and History. 3. [(none)<>D] An ethnohistorical study of those Native peoples inhabiting the plains region of the U.S. from prehistory to the present. Cross listed with AIST 3000. Prerequisite: 3 hours of AIST courses.

3020 [4020]. Historical Methods. 3. [(none)<>L, WB] An introduction to the concepts, methods, and techniques used by historians. The main emphasis will be on methods of historical research and analysis, demonstrated through writing. Students will write a number of short papers building skills in various areas of research, analysis, and argumentation, and one longer paper reflecting individual research. Total pages for the semester: 30-45. Prerequisites: junior standing, 12 hours in history, and WA. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3050. Athenian Democracy. 3. Examines democratic government in ancient Athens: its origins and development, its practical workings, how politics were conducted and power was gained and exercised, citizen participation, law courts, and evaluations of democracy in the ancient world and since. Cross listed with POLS/CLAS 3050. Prerequisites: WB.

3110. Modern Germany. 3. A cultural, social, and political history of German-Speaking Europe from 1789 to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 1120.

3120. Africa Since 1800. [C2, G1<>(none)] Survey of African history from the onset of the 19th century to the present day. Designed to provide an introduction to the main historical themes of the African past and an understanding of some of the main issues confronting Africa today. Cross listed with AAST 3120. Prerequisite: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000-level course, or AAST/HIST 2360.

3210. The Islamic World in the Premodern Era. 3. Surveys the rise of Islam as a religion and as a political and cultural system from the time of Muhammad (7th century) to the apogee of the Ottoman Empire (17th century). Emphasizes the spread of Islam, dynasties and empires, dissenting groups, law and philosophy. Prerequisites: 6 hours of history or international studies.

3220. History of the Modern Middle East. 3. Surveys the Middle East from 1700 to the present. Emphasizes the demise of the Ottoman Empire, the rise of domination by European colonial powers, transformations in political, social, religious and cultural life, the rise of nationalist movements, the influence of oil, the growth of Islamist political groups and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Cross listed with RELI 3220. Prerequisite: 6 hours in history, religious studies or international studies.

3230. Early Christianity: From Jesus to Church. 3. Considers the development of the Christian religion from a small Jewish sect to its place as the official religion of the Roman Empire and beyond. It examines the development of creeds, doctrines, and institutions, placing them within their historical context. Prerequisites: RELI 1000, RELI/HIST 2225, or HIST 2113.

3235. Medieval Christianity. 3. Traces the development of ‘Christendom' in Europe between about 500 - 1500 CE, concentrating on the Latin West. It examines the growth of Christian institutions and practices, the Church's role as sole governing entity, along with conflicts with secular governments as they developed in later centuries. Cross listed with RELI 3235. Prerequisites: RELI/HIST 2225, HIST 1110, or RELI 1000.

3240. Reformation and Enlightenment Christianity. 3. The years between about 1500 and 1800 saw the permanent dismantling of Christianity in the West as a unified force, as Protestantism brought new ways of viewing the relationship between God and humanity. Once the fragmentation began, it accelerated rapidly as Enlightenment thinking challenged Christianity in new and complex ways. Prerequisites: RELI 1000, RELI/HIST 2225.

3275. World Christianities. 3. [(none)<>CH, G] Examines the development of Christianity primarily in Africa, Asia and South America. Cross listed with RELI 3275. Prerequisites: WB and CH.

3400. Mongol Empire. 3. Examines the history of the Mongol Empire from a world history perspective. Major themes: structure of a nomadic empire, how that empire interacted with the various settled states it conquered and ramifications of the Mongol conquest on trade, technology, and social and intellectual developments across Eurasia, between the years 1200 to 1450 ce. Prerequisite: 6 hours of History.

3670. African Diaspora. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Examines the process through which aspects of African culture have endured in the Diaspora. Analyzes the social relations between Diaspora Africans and non-African populations in North and South America, the Caribbean, Britain, Asia, and the Mediterranean. Cross listed with AAST 3670. Prerequisites: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000 level course, or AAST/HIST 2360.

3710. Gender: Humanities Focus. 3. [C1<>CH] Explores how men and women are imaged differently, studying the influence of representation on gender (including representations in literature, film, art, popular culture, and/or performance). Sharpens students' ability to analyze texts and images and investigate those texts' messages about gender, sexuality, ethnicity and class. Cross listed with ENGL/WMST/ART 3710. Prerequisite: WMST 1080 or ENGL 1010. (Offered once a year)

4000. Indians of Wyoming. 3. [(none)<>D] Examines Native American culture in Wyoming from pre-history to the 21st century. Analyzes social, political, and economic developments of Native peoples of Wyoming before, during, and after contact with Europeans. Discusses interaction between these diverse societies and explores the changing relationships between Indians and Euro-Americans through the periods after contact. Cross listed with AIST 4000. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST or AIST.

4030. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 (Max. 6). [W3<>(none)] For departmental majors; presented in a small group, non-lecture setting. Under close instructor supervision, students write reviews and essays, present critiques and oral reports and lead discussion on materials read by class. Prerequisite: advanced standing as a History major and HIST 3020; or advanced standing as History/SSSE concurrent major and either HIST 3020 or HIST 4055. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4050. Advanced Public History. 2-3 (Max. 6). Reading and practice in non-teaching professional uses of the discipline of history. Topics for consideration may include museum curatorial exercises, museum and historic site management, historical editing and publishing, programming for museums and other agencies dealing with history, site interpretation and preservation and private practice of public history. Prerequisites: HIST 2050, 6 hours of history courses, consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4055. Archival Research Methods. 3. Students will master advanced research strategies with interdisciplinary applications. Focuses on primary research and the development of advanced skills in information literacy, critical analysis of sources, verification of evidence, techniques for researching underdocumented populations, and interpretation of historical evidence. Advanced writing and oral presentation skills are emphasized. Dual listed with HIST 5055. Prerequisite: HIST 2050.

4060. Independent Study. 1-3 (Max. 6). Credit not to exceed 6 hours maximum, to be arranged in either European or American history. Primarily for juniors and seniors who can profit from independent work with minimal supervision. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in history; written permission of instructor required. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4075. Book History: Manuscripts. 3. Books in handwritten form are studied within their historical contexts: Mesopotamian and Indus Valley tablets; Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Jewish, Chinese, and Japanese scrolls; Early Christian, Medieval, Renaissance, Jewish, Islamic, Mayan, and Aztec codex manuscripts. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, with manuscript facsimiles used as visual aids. Prerequisite: junior standing and 6 hours of history.

4076. Book History: Printed. 3. Printed books from their original start in China, through Gutenberg's "printing revolution" in Europe, and up on to the present are studied within their historical contexts. All class sessions will utilize original books from the fifteenth through twenty-first centuries held at the University's Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 hours of history.

4077. Book History: Topics. 3 (Max. 6). An in-depth, hands-on study of books within their historical contexts. The topic will vary each time and focus on a particular theme, time period, place, or culture. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, using original books or facsimiles. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing, 6 hours of history (preferably with at least one of the other Book History courses).

4100. Early Medieval Europe. 3. [C1, G1<>(none)] Studies development of European civilization from decline of Rome to 12th century. Dual listed with HIST 5100. Prerequisite: HIST 1110, 2100 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered fall semester)

4110. The High Middle Ages. 3. [C1<>(none)] Studies history of European civilization between the 12th and 15th centuries. Dual listed with HIST 5110. Prerequisite: HIST 1110, 2100 or 4100. (Normally offered spring semester)

4112. History of the Medieval City. 3. [C2<>(none)] After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, cities virtually disappeared from Western Europe. Around 1000 Europe began its rise to world prominence and cities contributed to that rise. Examines development of cities in medieval Europe and explores life within those cities. Dual listed with HIST 5112. Prerequisite: HIST 1110, 2100, 4100 or 4110.

4113. Medieval Religious Dissent. 3. [C1<>(none)] Religious dissent in the Middle Ages included what we would call heresy, but also encompasses such marginal groups as Jews and witches. Examines development of orthodoxy and persecution of religious diversity between eleventh and 16th centuries within the historical context of the times. Dual listed with HIST 5113. Cross listed with RELI 4113.Prerequisite:HIST 1110, 4100, 4110 or 2225.

4120. Europe During the Renaissance. 3. [C1<>(none)] Intensely studies European history in 14th and 15th centuries. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semesters of even-numbered years)

4130. Europe During the Reformation. 3. [C1<>(none)] Intensely studies European history in the 16th century. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years)

4140. Europe During the Age of the Baroque. 3. [C1<>(none)] Intensely studies European history in 17th century. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100 or consent of instructor. (Offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years)

4150. Europe During the Age of the Enlightenment. 3. [C1<>(none)] Intensely studies European history in 18th century. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring semester of even-numbered years)

4170. Europe in the Nineteenth Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from the beginning of the nineteenth century through to the origins of the First World War in 1914. Dual listed with HIST 5170 Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4180. Europe in the 20th Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from 1890 to 1930. Dual listed with HIST 5180. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4190. Contemporary Europe (Since 1945). 3. An intensive study of European history from 1930 to present. Dual listed with HIST 5190. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4195. European Economic History. 3. [C2<>(none)] The history of European economies from the Renaissance through the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century. Focuses on the diverging paths of different economies in Europe, the role of agriculture in economic development, and the causes and nature of the Industrial Revolution. Dual listed with HIST 5195. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110 or consent of instructor.

4270. France: Old Regime and Revolution. 3. [C1<>(none)] The social, political and cultural history of early modern France (1598-1789), from the rise of the Absolutist state under Louis XIV to the outbreak of the Revolution. Explores the cultural and intellectual shifts from court culture at Versailles, to the Enlightenment, to the rise of revolutionary ideologies. Dual listed with HIST 5270. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2110.

4280. France Since 1814. 3. Encompasses the history of the political, social, economic, intellectual, ecclesiastical and military conflicts which shaped modern France. Dual listed with HIST 5280. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4290. History of the Soviet Union. 3. Depicts Russia under Communism, including particularly the development of totalitarian dictatorship in its political, economic, social and cultural manifestations. Dual listed with HIST 5290. Prerequisites: HIST 1110 or 1120 or HIST 2100, 2110 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4310. World War II in Europe. 3. [G1<>(none)] Covers the origins, course and consequences of one of this century's defining global developments. World War II in Europe was a transnational development which shaped the world as it is known today. Dual listed with HIST 5310. Prerequisites: HIST 1110 and 1120 and/or 2100 and 2110.

4315. Central Europe and the Holocaust. 3. Offers students the opportunity to learn about the history of the Holocaust through travel to various sites in Central Europe where the events themselves occurred, such as Berlin, Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Dual listed with HIST 5315. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

4320. Memory and National Identity in Twentieth Century Europe. 3. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. Examines the public representation of such historical trauma through the concept of "collective memory" and focuses in particular on how memory has become a contested part of defining identity in modern-day Europe. Dual listed with HIST 5320. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2110.

4325. Sites of Memory: Berlin and Budapest. 1. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. This class travels to Berlin, Germany and Budapest, Hungary over Spring Break to examine how these events have been remembered in museums and memorials. Recommended for students enrolled in HIST 4320, Memory and National Identity in Twentieth Century Europe. Dual listed with HIST 5325. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Additional costs for travel and accommodation.

4330. European Gender and Women's History. 3. [C2<>(none)] The experiences of women and the history of gender from the Renaissance through the 19th century. Focuses on the changing notions of the masculine and the feminine through such historical episodes as the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Dual listed with HIST 5330. Prerequisites: HIST 1110 or 2110.

4335. Women and Islam. 3. Examines women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the present in the Middle East and throughout the world. Themes include women's position in Islamic law, society and culture, Western images of Muslim women, veiling and Islamist movements, theoretical readings on power, gender and agency. Cross listed with WMST 4335, dual listed with HIST 5335. Prerequisites: 6 hours in women's studies, international studies, religious studies or history.

4340 [4840]. The Social History of American Women. 3. [C2<>(none)] Explores everyday life experiences of American women from the 17th century to the present. Focuses on the complex influence of gender, race and class in shaping those experiences; also, analyzes the ways in which women's dissatisfaction with their position in society formed the basis for the development of American feminism and led to the formation of an organized women's movement. Dual listed with HIST 5340. Prerequisite: ENGL 1080, WMST 1080, SOC 1080, HIST 1210/1211, 1220/1221 or consent of instructor.

4380. International History of Human Rights. 3. Examine the modern history of human rights in the global system, with particular emphasis on developments since the Second World War. Topics include the philosophy of human rights ideas; the histories of rights and rights violations in various regions; and the resulting international responses. Dual listed with HIST 5380; cross listed with INST 4380. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4400. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 12). The internship allows students to gain hands-on experience that will help to bridge the gap between history as an academic discipline and history as practiced in museums, public history agencies and historic sites. Specific arrangements must be made in advance to identify the academic component of the internship and the grading criteria. Such planning will be done in consultation with the department's internship director. Prerequisites: 12 hours of history; completion of HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221, 1250/1251 and 4050 or advanced standing as a history major; consent of instructor.

4405. American Encounters to 1850. 3. [C2<>D] The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African and Asian people from pre-contact through the mid-19th century. Dual listed with HIST 5405. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211 or consent of instructor.

4406. American Encounters from 1850. 3. [(none)<>D] The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from the mid-19th century to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211.

4410. America in an Early Modern World. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Explores the American colonial experience as part of a worldwide process of colonial encounters with indigenous peoples between 1400 and 1800. Compares the experiences of early modern colonization in North and South America, Asia, and the Pacific and examines the nature of the colonial societies created by these cross-cultural relationships. Dual listed with HIST 5410. Prerequisite: An American or World History course. 

4440. The Sectional Conflict. 3. Topically examines differences, north and south, which had crystallized by 1850 into competing institutions and ideologies. Includes Jacksonian party ethos, world of slavery, divisive aspects of territorial expansion and social and economic tensions which attended America's burgeoning free-market system. Dual listed with HIST 5440. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4450. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 3. Studies crisis of the Union, 1861-1877. Examines experiences of both the North and South during the Civil War and restoration of the Union after the war. Dual listed with HIST 5450. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4460. Post-Civil War America: The Gilded Age. 3. Intensively covers economic, cultural and political developments which marked the U.S. in post-Civil War era, such as rise of industry, emergence of distinctive national culture and party struggles shaping America's Gilded Age. Dual listed with HIST 5460. Prerequisites: HIST 1210 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4462. American Indian History to 1783. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians from the period before contact to the end of the American Revolution. Examines the various contacts between American Indians and Europeans and considers what the American Revolution meant to the continent's Native peoples. Dual listed with HIST 5462; cross listed with AIST 4462. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

4463. American Indian History 1783-1890. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the era of westward expansion. Examines the impact of American westward movement and also the manifold changes that accompanied moving west. Dual listed with HIST 5463; cross listed with AIST 4463. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

4464. American Indians in the Twentieth Century. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the twentieth century. Examines the development of new cultural, social and political forms that help create an American Indian identity. Dual listed with HIST 5464; cross listed with AIST 4464. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

4465 [4650]. Topics in American Indian History. 3. Provides topical approach to American Indian history. Through extensive readings and thorough class discussion, students build on previous course work in the field. Features best recent studies on American Indians in 19th and 20th centuries. Limited enrollment. Dual listed with HIST 5465. Prerequisites: HIST 2290 and consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4466. American Indian Ethnohistory. 3. [W3, G1<>(none)] Surveys ethnohistorical methods and concepts and provides students concrete opportunities to use these methodologies in writing exercises. American Indian ethnohistory explores Native American experiences within their own cultural contexts. Dual listed with HIST 5466; cross listed with AIST 4466. Prerequisites: ANTH 2210/AIST 2210 or HIST 2290/AIST 2290.

4468. American Indians in the North American West. 3. One of the defining features of the North American West is the presence of American Indians. Through the discussion of varied readings and primary document research, the history of American Indians in the West is examined, with particular emphasis on the Great Plains and California. Cross listed with AIST 4468; dual listed with HIST 5468. Prerequisites: HIST 2290/ AIST 2290.

4470. The Birth of Modern America, 1890-1929. 3. [C2<>(none)] Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in the wake of industrialization and massive immigration. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes shifting nature of reform between depression of the 1890s and that of the 1930s. Dual listed with HIST 5470. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered every third fall semester)

4475 [4670]. American Environmental History. 3. [C2<>(none)] Explores history of American attitudes and actions toward the land and natural resources. Dual listed with HIST 5475. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4480. Growth of Modern America, 1929-1960. 3. Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in Depression, World War II and early Cold War periods. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes economic crisis, growth of government, reform traditions, anti-communism and civil rights. Dual listed with HIST 5480. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220//1221 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered every third spring semester)

4485. U.S. Latino Diaspora. [G1<>(none)] Combines classroom activities and a week-long stay abroad in examining the historical creation and contemporary spread of the Latino Diaspora from the Caribbean to the Yucatan and beyond. U.S. Latina/o history, multiculturalism, pan-Latino identity, assimilation, migration trends and natives responses are stressed. Cross listed with CHST/INST 4485. Prerequisite: 9 hours of CHST, HIST, and/or INST related coursework.

4490. Modern America, 1960-Present. 3. [C2<>(none)] Studies political and diplomatic aspects of the U.S. since 1960. Emphasizes impact of Cold War, social and political tensions at home, civil rights and government policies. Dual listed with HIST 5490. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor.

4492. Indian Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century-Present 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] An ethnohistorical overview of Mesoamerican and Andean Indian cultures from the 15th century to the present. Course focuses on Native American responses to colonialism, capitalism, nationalism, and globalization. Covers recent developments, for example, the new Indian rights movement and the Chiapas rebellion in Mexico. Dual listed with HIST 5492. Prerequisites: 3 hours of relevant course work in HIST (e.g., 2290, 2380, 4495, 4496) or AIST (e.g., 2210, 2290, 4100, 4465) or ANTH (e.g., 2210).

4495 [4720]. Colonial Mexico/Borderlands. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Examines cultural, socioeconomic and political structures of colonial Mexico (1500-1850), in particular of the borderlands, today the U.S. Southwest. Key issues include ethnic relations, dependency and colonialism. Dual listed with HIST 5495. (Offered fall semester)

4496 [4800]. History of Mexico. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Intensive course in Mexican development. Emphasizes the 20th century especially the Mexican Revolution of 1910, showing how this nation transformed itself into a modern nation-state. Includes diplomatic relations with the U.S., incorporation of Indians, church-state relations, uses of land and other natural resources, role of the military and growth of Mexican nationalism. Dual listed with HIST 5496. Prerequisite: HIST 2380 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered fall semester)

4505 [4500]. The Old South, 1820-1861. 3. Studies history of the South from emergence of southern identity to the Civil War, Emphasizes southern society and culture. Dual listed with HIST 5505. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4510 [4950]. Modern Far East: China, Japan, and India. 3. Acquaints students with efforts to modernize China, Japan and India since the late 19th century. Emphasizes interaction of these civilizations with the Western world and explains ways in which such forces as imperialism, nationalism and communism have shaped their domestic and foreign policies in 20th century. Dual listed with HIST 5510. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4515 [4710]. American Legal History. 3. An intensive course in the history of American law, the judicial system, the legal profession and legal administration from colonial times to the present. Dual listed with HIST 5515. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211, 1220/1221 and/or consent of instructor. (Offered in spring semester of even-numbered years)

4525 [4700]. American Southwest. 3. Explores the Southwest as the location of cultural encounters and conflicts. Focuses on the cross-cultural interchange between American Indians, Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans from the fifteenth century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 5525; cross listed with CHST/AIST 4525. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 , 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered spring semester)

4530 [4630]. 19th Century American West. 3. A study of the westward movement with emphasis on the trans-Mississippi West. Dual listed with HIST 5530. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered fall semester)

4535. History of Oil. 3. Intensive study of the history of oil development throughout the world. Emphasizes comparative studies of the industry as it developed in various parts of the world and during various time periods, from pre-historic times to the present. The Wyoming oil/energy mineral history is an important component. Dual listed with HIST 5535. Prerequisite: 6 hours in history.

4540 [4640]. 20th Century American West. 3. A study of the modern American West, with consideration of social, economic and political continuity and change. Dual listed with HIST 5540. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered spring semester)

4545. The Multicultural West. 3. Explores the American West as a meeting ground of diverse peoples and their diverse cultures. Focuses on the sustained cross-cultural interchange between Native Americans, Euro-Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans, and Asian Americans from trans-Appalachia to the Pacific Coast from the eighteenth century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 5545. Prerequisites: Any history or social science course.

4546. Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity. 3. [(none)<>C, D] Addresses multiple themes related to diversity in agriculture with the goal of making visible the experiences of minorities and women in agriculture. Involves significant independent research, class discussion, project development, and development of oral and written communication skills. Establishes linkages with supporting disciplines. Cross listed with ENGL/ AAST/ AIST/ CHST/ AGRI/ AMST/ FCSC 4546. Prerequisites: Junior class standing or consent of instructor and concurrent enrollment or major in any of the following: ethnic studies, agriculture, American studies, anthropology, English, history, sociology, or women's studies.

4560. American Social History in the 20th Century. 3. [C2<>(none)] Explores history of social mobility and conflict in 20th century. Emphasizes impact of industrialization, rapid urbanization, massive immigration, ethnic minorities, race, religion, women and the family, painting and architecture. Dual listed with HIST 5560. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4582. 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations. 3. Studies Twentieth Century United States foreign relations with a focus on the Cold War period. Examines economic sources of policy decisions, elites and mass public opinion, as well as cultural, religious, ethnic, racial, and gender issues. Cross listed with INST 4582. Dual listed with HIST 5582. Prerequisite: HIST 1221.

4585 [4680]. Conference on U. S. History. 1-3 (Max. 6). Reading and writing course. Allows advanced students to investigate shifting ideas about important topics in 20th century American history. Primary focus varies from semester to semester, but will be designated in the class schedule. Dual listed with HIST 5585. Prerequisite: 6 hours of American history. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4610. Seminar Topics in the History of Wyoming I. 3. An intensive research and writing course dealing with topics in the period before statehood in 1890. Prerequisite: HIST 1250/1251 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4620. Seminar Topics in the History of Wyoming II. 3. Allows students to do intensive research and writing dealing with topics in Wyoming history from 1890 to present. Prerequisite: HIST 1250/1251 or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4665. History and Philosophy of American Education. 3. Provides cultural, philosophical, and historical perspectives drawn from the American experience and centered in the American ideology of equality of educational opportunity.  Major trends and philosophies that have developed, and are developing, in American education will be shared through discussion, presentations, and written projects. Dual Listed with HIST 5665. Cross listed with EDCI 4665. Prerequisite: Completion of WA with C or better.

4690. Research Topics in History. 1‑4 (Max. 6). Provides opportunity for undergraduate research in selected topics in History. Prerequisites: 18 credit hours of History coursework  and consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources) 

4990 [4080]. Topics in _____. 1-6 (Max. 12). Affords students opportunity to study in-depth various topics in history not offered in regular courses or independent study. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history or consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

5000. Indians of Wyoming. 3. Examines Native American culture in Wyoming from pre-history to the 21st century. Analyzes social, political, and economic developments of Native peoples of Wyoming before, during, and after contact with Europeans. Discusses interaction between these diverse societies and explores the changing relationships between Indians and Euro-Americans through the periods after contact. Dual listed with HIST 4000; cross listed with AIST 4000. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST or AIST.

5055. Archival Research Methods. 3. Students master advanced research strategies with interdisciplinary applications. Focuses on primary document research and the development of advanced skills in information literacy, critical analysis of sources, verification of evidence, techniques for researching underdocumented populations, and interpretation of historical evidence. Advanced writing and oral presentation skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: HIST 2050.

5070. History of Books. 3. A chronological survey traces written communication from the ancient world to the present. Within this historical framework, various topics that cross-cut tie periods and countries are explained. A substantial part of the class includes hands-on experience with rare books at the American Heritage Center. Prerequisites: 6 hours of history and junior standing.

5075. Book History: Manuscripts. 3. Books in handwritten form are studied within their historical contexts: Mesopotamian and Indus Valley tablets; Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Jewish, Chinese, and Japanese scrolls; Early Christian, Medieval, Renaissance, Jewish, Islamic, Mayan, and Aztec codex manuscripts. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, with manuscript facsimiles used as visual aids. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 hours of history.

5076. Book History: Printed. 3. Printed books from their original start in China, through Gutenberg's printing revolution in Europe, and on up to the present are studied within their historical contexts. All class sessions will utilize original books from the fifteenth through twenty-first centuries held at the University's Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 hours of history.

5077. Book History: Topics. 3. An in-depth, hands on study of books within their historical contexts. The topic varies each time, and focuses on a particular theme, time period, place, or culture. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, using original books or facsimiles. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: junior standing, or 6 hours of history (preferably with at least one of the other Book History courses).

5100. Early Medieval Europe. 3. The study of the development of European civilization from the decline of Rome to the twelfth century. Dual listed with HIST 4100. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100.

5110. The High Middle Ages. 3. Studies history of European civilization between the 12th and 15th centuries. Dual listed with HIST 4100. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2100.

5112. History of the Medieval City. 3. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, cities virtually disappeared from Western Europe. Around 1000, Europe began its rise to world prominence, and the birth of the cities contributed to that rise. This course examines the development of cities in medieval Europe and explores life within those cities. Dual listed with HIST 4112. Prerequisite: HIST 1110, 2100, 4100, or 4110.

5113. Medieval Religious Dissent. 3. Religious dissent in the Middle Ages included what we would call heresy, but also encompasses such marginal groups as Jews and witches. This course examines development of orthodoxy and the persecution of religious diversity between the 11th and 16th centuries. It also studies the historical context of the times. Dual listed with HIST 4113; cross listed with RELI 4113. Prerequisite: HIST 1110, 4100, or 4110.

5170. Europe in the 19th Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from the beginning of the nineteenth century through to the origins of the First World War in 1914. Dual listed with HIST 4170. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

5180. Europe in the 20th Century. 3. An intensive treatment of European history from 1890 to 1930. Dual listed with HIST 4180. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

5190. Contemporary Europe Since 1945. 3. An intensive study of European history since the Second World War. Dual listed with HIST 4190. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

5195. European Economic History. 3. The history of European economies from the Renaissance through the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. Focuses on the diverging paths of different economies in Europe, the role of agriculture in economic development, and the causes and nature of the Industrial Revolution. Dual listed with HIST 4195. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2110.

5270. France: Old Regime and Revolution. 3. The social, political and cultural history of early modern France (1598-1789), from the rise of the Absolutist state under Louis XIV to the outbreak of the Revolution. Explores the cultural and intellectual shifts from court culture at Versailles, to the Enlightenment, to the rise of revolutionary ideologies. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or HIST 2110.

5280. France Since 1814. 3. History of the political, social, economic, intellectual, ecclesiastical, and military conflicts which shaped modern France. Dual listed with HIST 4280. Prerequisite: HIST 1120, or HIST 1210.

5290. History of the Soviet Union. 3. Russia under Communism, including particularly the development of totalitarian dictatorship in its political, economic, social, and cultural manifestations. Dual listed with HIST 4290. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 and 1120 or HIST 2100 and 2110.

5310. World War II in Europe. 3. Covers the origins, course, and consequences of one of this century's defining global developments. World War II in Europe was a transnational development which shaped the world as we know it today. Dual listed with HIST 4310. Prerequisites: HIST 1110 and 1120 and/or 2100 and 2110.

5315. Central Europe and the Holocaust. 3. Offers students the opportunity to learn about the history of the Holocaust as they visit various sites in Central Europe where the events themselves occurred, such as Berlin, Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Dual listed with HIST 4315. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

5320. Memory and National Identity in 20th Century Europe. 3. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. Examines the public representation of such historical trauma through the concept of "collective memory" and focuses in particular on how memory has become a contested part of defining national identity in modern-day Europe. Prerequisite: HIST 1120 or 2110.

5325. Sites of Memory: Berlin and Budapest. 1. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. This class travels to Berlin, German and Budapest, Hungary over Spring Break to examine how these events have been remembered in museums and memorials. Recommended for students enrolled in HIST 4320. "Memory and National Identity in Twentieth Century Europe". Additional costs for travel and accommodations. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

5330. European Gender History. 3. The experiences of women and the history of gender from the Renaissance through the nineteenth century. Focuses on the changing notions of the masculine and the feminine through such historical episodes as the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Dual listed with HIST 4530; cross listed with WMST 5330. Prerequisite: HIST 1110 or 2110.

5335. Women and Islam. 3. Examines women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the present in the Middle East and throughout the world. Themes include women's position in Islamic law, society and culture, Western images of Muslim women, veiling and Islamist movements, theoretical readings on power, gender and agency. Dual listed with HIST 4335; cross listed with WMST 4335/5335. Prerequisite: 6 hours in women's studies, international studies, religious studies, or history.

5340. The Social History of American Women. 3. Explores the everyday life experiences of American women from the seventeenth century to the present with a focus on the complex influence of gender, race, and class in shaping those experiences. The course then turns to an analysis of the ways in which woman's dissatisfaction with the position in society formed American feminism and lead to the formation or an organized women's movement. Dual listed with HIST 4340. Prerequisites: ENGL/WMST/SOC 1080, HIST 1210/1211, 1220/1221.

5380. International History of Human Rights. 3. Examine the modern history of human rights in the global system, with particular emphasis on developments since the Second World War. Topics include the philosophy of human rights ideas; the histories of rights and rights violations in various regions; and the resulting international responses. Dual listed with HIST 4380; cross listed with INST 5380. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST or INST. 

5381. Seminar in Recent United States History. 3 (Max. 12).

5400. Graduate Topics in History. 1-6 (Max. 12). Opportunity to study in-depth various topics in history not yet offered in regular graduate seminars or graduate reading courses. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5405. American Encounters to 1859. 3. The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from pre-contact to the mid-19th century. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211.

5406. American Encounters from 1850. 3. The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from the mid-19th century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4406. Prerequisite: HIST 1210/1211.

5410. America in an Early Modern World. 3. [C2, G1<>CS, G] Explores the American colonial experience as part of a worldwide process of colonial encounters with indigenous peoples between 1400 and 1800. Compares the experiences of early modern colonization in North and South America, Asia, and the Pacific and examines the nature of the colonial societies created by these cross-cultural relationships. Dual listed with HIST 4410. Prerequisite: An American or World History course. 

5440. The Sectional Conflict. 3. Topically examines differences, north and south, which had crystallized by 1850 into competing institutions and ideologies. Includes Jacksonian party ethos, the world of slavery, the divisive aspects of territorial expansion and social and economic tensions which attended America's burgeoning free-market system. Dual listed with HIST 4440. Prerequisite: HIST 1210.

5450. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 3. A study of the crisis of the Union, 1861-1877. Examination of the experiences of both the North and the South during the Civil War and restoration of the Union after the war. Dual listed with HIST 4450. Prerequisite: HIST 1210 and 1220/1221.

5460. Post-Civil War America: The Gilded Age. 3. An intensive study in the economic, cultural, and political developments which marked the U.S. in post-Civil War era, the rise of industry, the emergence of a distinctive national culture and the party struggles that shaped America's Gilded Age. Dual listed with HIST 4460. Prerequisite: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5462. American Indian History to 1783. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians from the period before contact to the end of the American Revolution. Examines the various contacts between American Indians and Europeans and considers what the American revolution meant to the continent's Native peoples. Dual listed with HIST 4462; cross listed with AIST 5462. Prerequisites: HIST/AIST 2290.

5463. American Indian History to 1890. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the era of westward expansion. Examines the impact of American westward movement and also the manifold changes that accompanied Indians moving west. Dual listed with HIST 4463; cross listed with AIST 5463. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

5464. American Indians in the 20th Century. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the twentieth century. Examines the development of new cultural, social and political forms that help create an American Indian identity. Dual listed with HIST 4464; cross listed with AIST 5464. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

5465. Topics in American Indian History. 3. Provides topical approach to American Indian history. Through extensive readings and thorough class discussion, students build upon previous course work in the field. The best recent studies on American Indians in the 19th and 20th centuries are featured. Limited enrollment. Dual listed with HIST 4465. Prerequisite: HIST 2290.

5466. American Indian Ethnohistory. 3. Surveys ethnohistorical methods and concepts and provides students concrete opportunities to use these methodologies in writing exercises. American Indian ethnohistory explores Native American experiences within their own cultural contexts. Dual listed with HIST 4466; cross listed with AIST 5466. Prerequisite: ANTH/AIST 2210 or HIST/AIST 2210.

5468. American Indians in the North American West. 3. One of the defining features of the North American West is the presence of American Indians. Through the discussion of varied readings and primary document research, this course examines the history of American Indians in the West, with particular emphasis on the Great Plains and California. Dual listed with HIST 4468; cross listed with AIST 4468/5468. Prerequisite: HIST/AIST 2290.

5470. The Birth of Modern America, 1890-1929. 3. Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in the wake of industrialization and massive immigration. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes shifting nature of reform between the depression of the 1890s and that of the 1930s. Dual listed with HIST 4470. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211 and 1220/1221.

5475. American Environmental History. 3. History of American attitudes and actions toward the land and natural resources. Dual listed with HIST 4475. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history.

5480. Growth of Modern America, 1929-1960. 3. A political and diplomatic overview of the United States in Depression, World War II and early Cold War periods. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasis on economic crisis, growth of government, reform traditions, anti-communism, and civil rights. Dual listed with HIST 4480. Prerequisites: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5490. Modern America, 1960 to Present. 3. A political and diplomatic overview of the United States since 1960 with emphasis on impact of Cold War social and political tensions at home, civil rights, and government policies. Dual listed with HIST 4490. Prerequisites: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5492. Indians Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century to Present. 3. An ethnohistorical overview of Mesoamerican and Andean Indian cultures from the 15th Century to the present. Course focuses on Native American responses to colonialism, capitalism, nationalism, and globalization. Covers recent developments, for example, the new Indian rights movement and the Chiapas rebellion in Mexico. Dual listed with HIST 4492. Prerequisite: 3 hours of relevant course work in HIST (e.g., 2290, 2380, 4495, 4496) or AIST (e.g., 2210, 2290, 4100, 4465) or ANTH (e.g., 2210).

5495. Colonial Mexico/Borderlands. 3. Examines the cultural, socioeconomic and political structures of colonial Mexico (1500-1850), in particular of the borderlands, today the U.S. Southwest. Key issues include ethnic relations, dependency and colonialism. Dual listed with HIST 4495.

5496. History of Mexico. 3. Intensive course in Mexican development. Emphasizes the 20th century especially the Mexican Revolution of 1910, showing how this nation transformed itself, into a modern nation state. Includes diplomatic relations with the U.S., incorporation of Indians, church-state relations, uses of land and other an natural resources, role of the military and growth of Mexican nationalism. Dual listed with HIST 4496; cross listed with CHST 4496. Prerequisite: HIST 2380.

5500. Readings in Women's Studies. 3. An interdisciplinary course at the graduate level focusing on feminist criticism and theory, which draws on current debates in feminist analysis from the general areas of history, literature, and social science, to inform students of reformulations of research and unresolved issues. Dual listed with WMST 5500. Prerequisites: graduate status, 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5505. The Old South, 1820-1861. 3. The history of the South from the emergence of southern identity to the Civil War, with emphasis on southern society and culture. Dual listed with HIST 4505. Prerequisite: HIST 1210.

5510. Modern Far East: China, Japan, and India. 3. The primary purpose is to acquaint students with efforts to modernize China, Japan, and India since the late 19th century. Emphasizes interaction of these civilizations with the Western world and explains ways in which such forces as imperialism, nationalism, and communism have shaped their domestic and foreign policies in the 20th century. Dual listed with HIST 4510. Prerequisite: 6 hours of history.

5515. American Legal History. 3. An intensive study in the history of American law, the judicial system, the legal profession, and legal administration from colonial times to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4515. Prerequisite: HIST 1210, 1220 and/or consent of instructor.

5525. American Southwest. 3. Explores the Southwest as a location of cultural encounters and conflicts. Focuses on the cross-cultural interchange between American Indians, Mexican Indians and Anglo Americans from the fifteenth century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4525. Prerequisites: HIST 1210/1211, 1220/1221.

5530. 19th Century American West. 3. A study of the westward movement with emphasis on the trans-Mississippi West. Dual listed with HIST 4530. Prerequisite: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5535. History of Oil. 3. An intensive study in the history of oil development throughout the world. Emphasizes comparative studies of the industry as it developed in various parts of the world and during various time periods, from pre-historic times to the present. The Wyoming oil/energy mineral history will be an important component of the course. Dual listed with HIST 4535. Prerequisite: 6 hours in history.

5540. 20th Century American West. 3. A study of the modern American West, with consideration of social, economic and political continuity and change. Dual listed with HIST 4540. Prerequisites: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5545. The Multicultural West. 3. Explores the American West as a meeting ground of diverse peoples and their diverse cultures. Focuses on the sustained cross-cultural interchange between Native Americans, Euro-Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans, and Asian Americans from trans-Appalachia to the Pacific Coast from the eighteenth century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4545.

5555. American Encounters. 3. Examines the centrality of cross-cultural interchange in American history by focusing on a series of critical encounters between American, European, African, and Asian people from the 16th century to the present. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5560. American Social History in the 20th Century. 3. History of social mobility and conflict in the 20th century. Special emphasis on impact of industrialization, rapid urbanization, massive immigration, ethnic minorities, race, religion, women and the family, painting, and architecture. Dual listed with HIST 4560. Prerequisites: HIST 1210 and 1220.

5582. 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations. 3. Studies Twentieth Century United States foreign relations with a focus on the Cold War period. Examines economic sources of policy decisions, elites and mass public opinion, as well as cultural, religious, ethnic racial and gender issues. Dual listed with HIST 4582; cross listed with INST 5582. Prerequisite: HIST 1221.

5585. Conference on U.S. History. 1-3 (Max. 6). A reading and writing course designed to allow advanced students to investigate shifting ideas about important topics in 20th century American history. Primary focus varies from semester to semester, but will be designated in the class schedule. Dual listed with HIST 4585. Prerequisite: 6 hours of American history.

5600. Graduate Readings. 1-6 (Max. 12). Fulfills two purposes in our graduate program in history. It allows students to do independent directed reading in preparation for their graduate examination in history and provides students with a flexible alternative to their programs to meet and complete requirements. Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of history.

5605. Conference on Wyoming and the West. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5612. Archives III. 3 (Max. 6). Designed as an internship to provide students hands-on experience in an archival setting. With guidance provided by the instructors, students are expected to arrange and describe a collection, understand the basics of cataloging, and work with researchers in the reference area. Students are asked to complete projects in each area, and are required to turn in work logs or journals regarding the internship experience. Prerequisite: HIST 4040/5040, HIST 4042/5042 and 18 hours of history.

5615. Conference on Early American History. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5620. Conference on Middle-Period and United States History. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5630. Seminar on Western American History. 3. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5640. Conference on American Indian History. 1-4 (Max. 9). An intensive readings course using some of the best Indian history written in the last twenty years. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5645. Seminar on American Indian History. 3. Research seminar on American Indian history. The focus of the seminar may vary, but emphasis will usually be given to American Indians of the western United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5650. Conference on Medieval European History. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5655. Seminar on Medieval European History. 3 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5660. Conference on Early Modern Europe. 1-4 (Max. 9). The student, in consultation with the instructor, chooses a topic on which he/she reads extensively. The instructor provides bibliographical guidance. Normally the student discusses the reading at length with the instructor once a week. Written analysis of the reading may also be required. The course may be offered to a group of students who need extensive reading to go with the research experience they are receiving in seminars. Prerequisite: 14 semester hours in history and consent of instructor.

5665. History and Philosophy of American Education. 3. Provides cultural, philosophical, and historical perspectives drawn from the American experience and centered in the American ideology of equality of educational opportunity.  Major trends and philosophies that have developed, and are developing, in American education will be shared through discussion, presentations, and written projects. Dual Listed with HIST 4665. Cross listed with EDCI 5665. Prerequisites: Graduate student status; priority enrollment given to students registered in the C&I/Curriculum Studies area.

5670. Seminar on Early American History. 3. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5675. Seminar on Middle-Period U.S. History. 3. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5680. Seminar on Recent U.S. History. 3. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5685. Conference on European 19th and 20th Century History. 1-4. Available for a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 690. Seminar on European History. 3. Available for a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5695. Conference on English History. 1-4 (Max. 9). The student, in consultation with the instructor, chooses a topic on which he/she reads extensively. The instructor provides bibliographical guidance. Normally the student discusses the reading at length with the instructor once a week. Written analysis of the reading may also be required. May be offered to a group of students who need extensive reading to go with the research experience they are receiving in seminars. Prerequisite: 14 semester hours in history and consent of instructor.

5700. Seminar on Cultural History. 3. Examines the multiple ways in which historians and anthropologists have approached the concept of culture. Readings include both case studies and theoretical writings from different schools of cultural studies, ranging from the French Annales School to Postmodernism. Topics to be covered include popular culture, microhistory, gender and discourse theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5800. Conference on Latin American History. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5810. Seminar on Latin American History. 1-4 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5880. History Theory. 3. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Students are expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students involved in research for their dissertation. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program. 

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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