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UW Researchers to Present at Ecological Society of America Meeting

June 26, 2017

Seventeen University of Wyoming faculty, staff and students will present their research findings at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America Aug. 6-11 in Portland, Ore.

A number of the research topics are relevant to Wyoming. Elk movement and the spread of brucellosis; nitrogen deposition in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem; Wyoming farmer and rancher perspectives on land management and ecosystem services; and the importance of memory in wildlife migration are among the subjects UW presenters will cover in either oral or poster presentations.

About 5,000 people are scheduled to attend the annual meeting at the Oregon Convention Center.

Here are the UW researchers scheduled to give oral presentations, along with their topics:

-- Angela Brennan, postdoctoral research associate in the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit -- Elk movement and the spread of brucellosis in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

-- Reilly Dibner, postdoctoral research associate in the Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources -- How greater short-horned lizards use sagebrush to maintain suitable body temperatures.

-- Joanna Harter, graduate student in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management -- The effects of wetlands variation in prairie landscapes on bird diversity.

-- Abigail Hoffman, graduate student in the Department of Botany -- Using lichen to monitor air quality, including nitrogen deposition from human activities, in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

-- Randa Jabbour, assistant professor in the Department of Plant Sciences -- Evaluating the ecosystem services provided in agricultural landscapes in Wyoming through interviews with both producers and the agriculture and conservation professionals who work with them.

-- Daniel Laughlin, associate professor in the Department of Botany -- The relationship of genetics and environment in plants in areas of northern Arizona.

-- Bethann Merkle, associate research scientist in the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit -- Evaluating ecological inaccuracies in children’s picture books.

-- Jerod Merkle, postdoctoral research associate in the Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit -- The importance of memory in wildlife migration.

-- Kyle Palmquist, postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Botany -- How soil and water conditions affect plant diversity in sagebrush ecosystems.

-- Corinna Riginos, adjunct associate professor in the Department of Zoology and Physiology, and Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources -- How livestock management at moderate stocking rates is compatible with wildlife conservation in Kenya.

-- Daniel Schlaepfer, former postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Botany -- The effects of climate change engineering, through the reflection of sunlight, on droughts in dryland areas.

-- Rebecca Wilcox, graduate student in the Department of Zoology and Physiology -- Seed dispersal by exotic bird species on Hawaii’s Oahu island.

-- Tamara Zelikova, postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Botany -- The impact of leafcutter ants on soils in a Costa Rican rainforest.

Here are the UW researchers scheduled to give poster presentations, along with their topics:

-- Sarah Brannon, undergraduate student in the Department of Zoology and Physiology -- The influence of changing rainfall, parental traits and nest traits on parental care in a tropical bird.

-- Sara Carabajal, graduate student in the Department of Plant Sciences -- The effects of cover crop mixtures on ground beetles at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

-- Samuel Case, graduate student in the Department of Zoology and Physiology -- The effects of introduced game bird species on seed dispersal in Hawaiian forests.

-- Karen Vaughan, assistant professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management -- Carbon sequestration in the soils of the Snowy Range.


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Chad Baldwin

Institutional Communications

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Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-2929

Email: cbaldwin@uwyo.edu

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