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M31 - Andromeda Galaxy

Public Show Schedule

Public Planetarium Shows

All programs are approximately an hour in length. Doors open ~15 minutes ahead of the show time. Seating is first-come first serve outside of designated ADA/wheelchair seating 

Tickets are $5 for the general public, $3 for UW students/staff/faculty, veterans, first responders, or children. Seating is free for children under 5. Reservations or pre-purchase is not required, walk-ins are welcome. You can purchase tickets online with credit card, reserve tickets over email or voicemail, or walk-in and purchase tickets at the start of the show.

Purchase tickets online with credit card.

You may need to disable your ad-blocker and/or enable pop-ups to complete your online ticket purchase. Online ticket sales close at 4:00PM day-of for Tuesday shows. Friday and Saturday shows close online sales at 4:00PM Friday. If online sales are closed you'll need to arrive and pay in-person.

To reserve tickets or get more information contact us via email or voicemail Monday - Friday 8:00AM - 4:00PM 

email: planetarium@uwyo.edu

voicemail: 307-766-6506 (Please leave a voice message and it will forward to email, we will return your call ASAP. If you don't leave a voicemail we won't be able to return your call as quickly.)

If you have a large group or are unable to attend our public shows don't hesitate to contact us for a private show.

Show Descriptions

September 17, 7PM "Dawn of the Space Age" From the launch of the first artificial satellite Sputnik, to the magnificent lunar landings and privately operated space flights. Be immersed and overwhelmed with this most accurate historic reconstruction of Man’s first steps into space. Who were these Men and Women that took part in these death defying endeavours? Witness their drive, their passion, and their perseverance to explore, in Dawn of the Space Age.

Cancelled for football - September 18, 2PM "Mexican Archeaoastronomy" Through impressive scenarios, “Mexica Archaeoastronomy: between space and time” illustrates the important role played by astronomical observation for the evolution of pre-Hispanic cultures in central Mexico. The Mexicans used the calendrical and astronomical knowledge inherited by their predecessor cultures to found the capital of their empire: Tenochtitlan. Vibrant colors, shapes and sounds transport the viewer to one of the most important cultures that, to this day, still lives in the heart and skin of the Mexican people.

September 21, 7PM "Wyoming Skies" What’s up in the sky around Wyoming: stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers, and more.

September 24, 7PM "Dark Matter Mystery" What keeps Galaxies together? What are the building blocks of the Universe? What makes the Universe look the way it looks today? Researchers all around the world try to answer these questions. We know today that approximately a quarter of the Universe is filled with a mysterious glue: Dark Matter. We know that it is out there. But we have no idea what it is made out of.

September 25, 2PM "Out There: Extrasolar Worlds"  will transport viewers from this world to entirely new and foreign ones. The show features the primitive science fiction of early civilizations, to the future space missions that will observe the Universe in greater-than-ever detail and travel to the surfaces and oceans of moons in our Solar System.

October 1, 7PM "Meet the Planets" A tour of the sun's planets, moons. Learn the discoveries, exploration, and feats of technology that have probed the solar system.

October 2, 2PM "From Earth to the Universe" The night sky, both beautiful and mysterious, has been the subject of campfire stories, ancient myths and awe for as long as there have been people. A desire to comprehend the Universe may well be humanity’s oldest shared intellectual experience. Yet only recently have we truly begun to grasp our place in the vast cosmos. To learn about this journey of celestial discovery, from the theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes, we invite you to experience From Earth to the Universe.

October 5, 7PM "Wyoming Skies" What’s up in the sky around Wyoming: stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers, and more.

October 8, 7PM "Astrobiology" Is there anybody out there? The search for extra-terrestrial life continues as scientists scour the solar system for signs of ancient or modern signs of life, radio telescope listen for signs from E.T., and next generation telescopes explore the planets of other star systems. Are we alone in the universe?

October 9, 2PM "Distant Worlds Alien Life" is a beautiful planetarium film exploring one of the most enduring questions of humankind -- are we alone? For millennia our ancestors watched the stars, questioning the origin and nature of what they saw. Still today we ask these questions, knowing that the Universe is a vast place filled with billions and billions of stars and planets -- but yet, Earth is the only planet we know for sure to be inhabited.

October 15, 7PM "Lunar Exploration: Apollo & Artemis" See the history of lunar exploration and learn about the newest efforts to get humanity back to the moon.

October 16, 2PM "Max Goes to the Moon" Max (the dog) and a young girl named Tori take the first trip to the Moon since the Apollo era. Along the way, the story sets the stage for the more sophisticated science of the “Big Kid Box” sidebars, which cover topics including “Phases of the Moon,” “Wings in Space?,” and “Frisbees and Curve Balls on the Moon” — all thoughtfully explained so that grownups and children can learn together about science. Toward the end, Max and Tori’s trip proves so inspiring to people back on Earth that all the nations of the world come together to build a great Moon colony from which “the beautiful views of Earth from the Moon made everyone realize that we all share a small and precious planet.”

October 16, 6PM "Observe the Moon Night" S.T.A.R. Observatory on the roof of the Physical Sciences building will be open to the public for observing the moon! Free event, weather permitting. 

October 19, 7PM "Wyoming Skies" What’s up in the sky around Wyoming: stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers, and more.

October 22, 6PM "WIRO Open House" The annual open house for the Wyoming InfraRed Observatory(WIRO) at Jelm Mountain will be occurring. There will not be a show at the planetarium that evening. Please contact the Physics and Astronomy Department at physics@uwyo.edu or 307-766-6150 for information about visiting WIRO.

Cancelled for football - October 23, 2PM "The Sun Our Living Star" The Sun has shone on our world for four and a half billion years. The light that warms our skin today has been felt by every person who has ever lived. It is our nearest star and our planet’s powerhouse, the source of the energy that drives our winds, our weather and all life. The passage of the Sun’s fiery disc across the sky — day by day, month by month — was the only way to keep track of time for countless past civilizations. Don’t be fooled by the terminology; although it is a typical dwarf star, the Sun consumes 600 million tons of hydrogen each second and is 500 times as massive as all the planets combined. Discover the secrets of our star in this planetarium show and experience never-before-seen images of the Sun’s violent surface in immersive fulldome format. Our team has worked with some of the most talented planetarium producers to bring you this visually striking planetarium show about the most important star in our lives.

October 29. 7PM "James Webb Space Telescope w/ Dr. Daniel Dale" The next generation space telescope is set to be launched later this year. The epic mission to send a tennis-court sized observatory past the moon will reveal the mysteries of the universe like never before. University of Wyoming Astronomer Dr. Daniel Dale will detail the exciting science objectives and the knuckle-biting engineering feats that have gone into our next eyes in the sky.

October 30, 2PM "Two Small Pieces of Glass" Two Small Pieces of Glass – The Amazing Telescope fulldome show follows two students as they interact with a female astronomer at a local star party. Along the way, the students learn the history of the telescope from Galileo’s modifications to a child’s spyglass — using two small pieces of glass — to the launch of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the future of astronomy. Aiming to engage and appeal to audiences of all ages, the show explores the wonder and discovery made by astronomers throughout the last 400 years.

Free Online Planetarium Shows

To Space and Back

Back to the Moon for Good

Dark Matter Mystery

Distant Worlds - Alien Life? (German Audio)

Europe to the Stars

From Earth to the Universe

Hot and Energetic Universe

Max Goes to the Moon

Out There: The Quest for Extrasolar Worlds

Phantom of the Universe

Sunstruck 

The Sun, Our Living Star

Two Small Piece of Glass - The Amazing Telescope

Complete Planetarium Film List

Due to license restrictions not all of our films are available online. Please check our Planetarium Film List to learn about other films only available in our theater.

Triple Conjunction of Jupiter, Saturn, and Mercury

triple conjunction of Jupiter, Saturn and Mercury as seen from Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii.


Contact Us

UW Planetarium

Mailing Address:

UW Planetarium

1000 E University Ave

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307-766-6506

Email: planetarium@uwyo.edu

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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