Fall leaves on the UW Campus

Fall 2024 Courses

Registration Guidelines

Meeting times, locations, CRNs, specific section numbers, are all listed in WyoRecords under the “Look Up Classes” search function.

Pre-Requisites: All Honors Upper-Division Classes (3000 and 4000 level) require students to have completed their COM 1 and COM 2 requirements.

Main campus Honors College fall courses will open to non-Honors College after the early enrollment period. Non-Honors College students wishing to register for these courses need to have at least a 3.25 cumulative UW GPA and will need to request an override from the Honors College. Students should email Li Teng at to make this request. Online Honors classes are open to all students.

*Please note that Honors College FYS courses are open to all UW students with no override necessary.

Advising

Please reach out to the Honors Advising Team for more information and guidance when registering.

Course Modalities

 Traditional – This means that the class is scheduled to be in-person and students will meet face-to-face.

 Asynchronous Online – This means that the course will be completely online, without any scheduled meeting dates or times.

 Synchronous Online – This means that the course will be completely online, but there will be a synchronous requirement, meaning students will have specific day/times scheduled for Zoom sessions.

 

*Looking for summer 2024 course offerings? Check out our Summer 2024 Course Descriptions.*

 

 

HP 1020: Honors Colloquium I: Dreams and Reality
REQUIRED FOR ALL FIRST-YEAR HONORS STUDENTS*
*A first-year student is any student who begins at UW with fewer than 30 post high school college credit hours. Students who earned an associate’s degree while completing their high school degree are still considered first-year students.
Credits: 3
Instructor:
 Various
Modality: Various
Honors College Attributes: Colloquium 1
USP attributes: (COM1) Communication 1
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s): Major Core (HP 1020 is the first course in the Colloquium sequence)

Course Description: The first-year Colloquium is a required two-semester sequence of courses that takes the complex topic of Dreams and Reality and explores it with readings based in the humanities, arts, sciences, and social sciences. The courses builds community in the Honors College while promoting high levels of academic achievement. In the Colloquium, students push themselves to become stronger critical thinkers. They weigh and consider multiple points of view; they develop thoughtful, well-supported perspectives on important issues of our times; and they defend their ideas in public presentations.

Colloquium is enriched with visits to UW’s Theatre and Dance department, Art Museum, Archives, and Library, and with service projects carried out around Laramie. Expert faculty from various departments give specialized lectures on relevant topics. Distinguished visiting scholars and writers meet with students to discuss their work. In all these ways, Colloquium teaches students to take advantage of the rich resources we are privileged to have at UW.



HP 2150: Producing Knowledge: Analysis, Creativity, and Expression
Credits:
1
Instructors: 
Breezy Taggart/Peter Parolin
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Concurrent Major Core
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s): Major Core (HP 2150 is part of a series which also includes HP 2250)

Producing Knowledge: Analysis, Creativity, and Expression is an activity-based course introducing approaches to producing, refining, analyzing, and evaluating knowledge. Course topics are investigated through a combination of readings, lectures, research, and individual and collaborative activities. This course is part of the Producing Knowledge series, along with Interviews, Surveys, and Experiments (ISE); the two courses can be taken in any order.

Through this course you will gain exposure to the terminology, theory, and practice necessary for generating knowledge and insight that impacts academic, professional, and wider public audiences. You will have opportunity to practice the skills necessary for clear communication. You will be encouraged to develop your own personal awareness of and appreciation for different imaginative approaches to research and knowledge production. A culminating application challenge will be undertaken through exploration, experimentation, and refinement.

 

HP 3050: Religion and Unbelief and the Human Condition
Credits: 3
Instructor:
Tyler Fall
Modality: 
Traditional 
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: 
none
A&S attributes: (H) Human Culture
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description:
This course ranges across academic disciplines and examines and questions some of the dominant ideas western civilization has produced about religion, skepticism, unbelief, morality, society, and the ideal human life.  We will read authors from antiquity to the present.  They have divergent perspectives:  some are militant atheists; others are deeply religious.  Some are optimistic about human potential and progress; others are starkly pessimistic.  The course readings are drawn from a variety of literary genres -- philosophical treatises, poetry, memoirs, drama, and fiction -- but they all circle back to one fundamental question:  what should we humans do?"


HP 3050: Money
Credits:
3
Instructor: 
Brad Rettler
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description:
If you have money, you probably think about it quite a bit. And if you don’t have money, you probably think about it even more. In this course, we’ll think and talk a lot about money. We’ll ask metaphysical questions: what makes something money? Is gold money? Is Bitcoin? But mostly we’ll ask ethical questions: what is money’s role in our lives, and what should it be? How much money is enough? Are there certain things we shouldn’t use money for? Is it a problem that some people have a lot of money and some people don’t have enough? If so, what should we do about it? The hope is that you will leave this course with a better understanding of money and what its role in your life should be.

This topic lies at the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics. We will engage with both theoretical and empirical concepts, analysis, and arguments. Reading assignments will come from recent philosophical articles, research articles in the social science, and some short stories.

 

HP 3151: Gender and Sexuality in the Cinema of the Middle East 
Credits:
 3
Instructor: 
Ahmad Nadalizadeh
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Global Perspectives (*Nonwestern), Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description: 
If the Middle East has been historically represented as an exotic and mysterious land where sexual taboos are frequently violated and where women fall victim to an exceptionally patriarchal and misogynist culture, the medium of cinema has proven instrumental in drawing the contours of that Orientalist image and in rendering the mysteries of the Middle East, to evoke Edward Said, “plain to and for the West.” Taking seriously the role of the film medium in rendering plain the mysteries of the Middle East, we turn to the cinema cultures of this region to examine the ways in which its films represent or reconfigure hegemonic and heteronormative subjectivities. Alternatively, we consider how these movies help generate, consolidate, and disperse queer desires and subjectivities, thereby subverting the oversimplified image of the Middle East held up to and for the West. We will investigate how the domestic film traditions of the region challenge the predominant gender stereotypes of women through a recognition of multiple feminisms and by representing alternate gender relations bolstered by the various cultural, national, and religious values. Additionally, connecting the local to the global, this course considers how the gendered agencies of the Middle East problematize the hegemony of the Western secular gender politics. Lastly, it will focus on the representations of gendered public and private spaces in films, investigating the complex nexus between form and politics. Drawing on an inclusive selection of films from various traditions in the Middle East, our course discusses movies from Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Iraqi Kurdistan.


HP 3151: Chinese Medicine and Models of Healthcare
Credits: 3
Instructor: Chris Dewey

Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Global Perspectives (*Nonwestern), Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Health, Policy and the Body

Course Description:
On offer here is a class that examines Traditional Chinese Medicine as an integral component of contemporary models of health care. Students will learn from a practicing Chinese Medicine clinician about evidence-based practice, the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine, its modalities including acupuncture, how it is used to treat disease, and the diagnostic tools we use in a clinical setting. Students will also participate in a typical client intake and observe a full acupuncture treatment. Together we will examine what it means to use Chinese Medicine in service of the consumer’s journey to wellness. The nuanced and abstruse lexicon used by practitioners in any branch of health care, combined with the ways in which Eastern and Western care paradigms differ from each other, can be confusing and alienating to both practitioners and consumers alike. The course will help to dispel the confusion and division that can exist between seemingly different models of health care and demonstrate the value of integrated medicine to health, healing and wellness.


HP 3151: Islamic Law

Credits:
3
Instructor: 
Hamid Khan
Modality: 
Asynchronous Online
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Global Perspectives (*Nonwestern), Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description: Though often maligned and misunderstood, Islamic law is one of the world's longest-enduring and most widely subscribed law systems. This course will give students a firm grounding in Islamic law's sources, principles, concepts, and terminology and an in-depth review of its history and role in the contemporary era. Students will gain practical insights into the sources and constructs of this religious-based legal system, including the substantive difference between the Shari’a and Islamic jurisprudence, as well as an in-depth analysis of the Qur'an, the Tradition of the Prophet Muhammad, as well as the various legal constructs devised by jurists and eminent scholars, the Islamic schools of law, differences between Shi'i and Sunni Islamic law. The seminar will delve into Islamic law's historical demise and modern resurgence. Finally, students will gain an in-depth understanding of selected aspects of Islamic constitutionalism, Islamic criminal law, and how classical and contemporary Islamic law comports with international human rights law and other contemporary issues

 

HP 3156: Inuit Environmental Dilemmas
Credits: 3
Instructor: Joslyn Cassady

Modality: 
Synchronous Online 
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Global Perspectives (*Nonwestern), Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: 
none
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity in the United States
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Environment, Ethics, and Humankind
Health, Policy and the Body
Creativity, Social Justice, and our World

Course Description:
The Arctic is experiencing rapid environmental change due largely to human activities in the south. Three of the processes that are creating the most dramatic changes in Arctic ecosystems are climate change, the northern flow of industrial toxins and intensified resource exploration and extraction. This course focuses on how these three processes are affecting the livelihood of roughly 160,000 Inuit living in Siberia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland. By focusing on Inuit strategies and engagements, this course will dispel enduring misconceptions of northern peoples as passive victims of outside forces while simultaneously examining the considerable challenges that they face in maintaining control of their lives and land. Ultimately, I hope this course raises awareness about how our own lifestyles are exacerbating environmental injustices and culture change in the Far North.

 

HP 3157: Wyoming Walkabout
Credits: 3
Instructor:
Paul Taylor
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Global Perspectives (*Nonwestern), Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: G (Global Awareness)
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Environment, Ethics, and Humankind
Creativity, Social Justice, and our World

Course Description: A unique experiential exposure to the "world's oldest living culture." Students will explore Australia's 50,000-year-old Aboriginal culture lead by educator/artist Paul Taylor. www.paultaylor.ws  Mentored by elder Yidumduma Bill Harney, senior custodian of the Wardaman culture, students will be guided by video material collected over 15 years by Paul's Yubulyawan Dreaming Project. www.ydproject.com  Students will study the 10 video chapters on this site and be participants in this continuing research. We will explore what it is to be indigenous, participate in ritual, song, dance and painting. We will learn the Wardaman Creation Story, applying this wisdom to our landscape and personal lives. We will have field trips to the UW Planetarium, our local Casper Aquifer and an American Indian sacred site. We will apply storytelling in class; make, play and decorate a didgeridoo. We will work together on a class mural, teaching to “Care for Country”, celebrating our land, our personal "Walkabouts", our own life journeys.

 

HP 4152: Mass Media and Collective Consciousness
Credits:
3
Instructor: Adrian Molina

Modality: 
Asynchronous Online
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Technology Society and the Future
Creativity, Social Justice, and our World

Course Description:
This course explores the most central and critical issues of our times: Humanity, Technology, and Sustainability.  In this course, the student is the main "Text," meaning that each student will engage in contemplative education practices.  Students will examine their own lives in relationship to technology, mass media, social media, and how the cyborg-ification of our lives affects our physical, mental, and emotional health, as well as our relationships with other humans.  

Additionally, this is a topics course that may explore any of the following: the development of collective consciousness; historical uses of propaganda; functions of mass media; the functions of corporate media vs independent media; how mass media affects public opinion; journalism and ethical considerations; pop culture's relationship to American values and standards; the nature of news coverage and news filters; access to media and social justice concerns; functions of art and entertainment; critiques of mass media and pop culture; alternative forms of media; futurist perspectives on human consciousness; ecological and environmental concerns; and real-time developments in technology.

 

HP 4153: Neuroscience and Law 
Credits:
3
Instructor: Karagh Brummond

Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: PN (Physical and Natural World)
A&S attributes: none
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Health, Policy and the Body
Technology Society and the Future

Course Description: Lawyers and courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, are already integrating neuroscience research into their arguments and opinions on cases from criminal to civil litigation. This class will introduce the exciting field of "neurolaw" by covering issues such as neuroscience of criminal culpability, brain-based lie detection, brain death, emotions, decision making, and much more. Along the way we'll discuss how the legal system can and should respond to new insights on topics such as adolescent brain development, addiction, psychopathy, Alzheimer's, effects of combat on soldiers' brains, and concussions from sports injuries. Students will be pushed to determine and develop a sense of how, when, and where neuroscience can and cannot aid in the goals of law. Please note that this course will be approached from a heavy science side providing students with a deep understanding of neuroscience and the application of neuroscience literature in courtrooms. We will be looking closely at topics including the structure and function of the brain, brain monitoring and manipulation techniques, and how essential studies in neuroscience have been used by the legal system. Students will be reflecting on and drawing conclusions about the ethical and legal implications of using neuroscientific data in law through synthesis of neuroscience research.

 

HP 4154: Art and Culture of Hip Hop
Credits: 3
Instructor:
Adrian Molina
Modality: Asynchronous Online
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description:
This course is an inter- and multi-disciplinary course inspired by human culture.  This course explores a culture and form of music that hundreds of millions of people throughout the world identify with.  Hip-Hop was born in the South Bronx, NY in the early 1970s, where African-American, Latino, and immigrant populations were essentially cast off as a result of the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway, white flight into the suburbs, and the politics of abandonment.  Hip-Hop music and culture has now spread throughout the world, and regardless of whether the discussion is about mainstream gangster rap or socially and political conscious Hip-Hop, this emerging field of study has broad, cultural, social, political, and economic implications.  Students will research, explore, discuss and write about American historical music influences, the history and development of hip-hop, the various artistic elements of hip-hop, hip-hop as a culture,  hip-hop journalism, and hip-hop’s influence on American society.  Using hip-hop as an academic tool, students will also explore the following issues: race relations, racism, sexism and misogyny, class struggle, urbanization, pan-ethnicity and ethnic/cultural diasporas, civil rights era activism, post-civil rights Black and Latina/o community leadership, activism through art, globalization, the commodification of art and culture in corporate America, the perpetuation of racism and sexism through mass media, alternative forms of cultural media, the poetics of hip-hop, and communication through musical form.

 

HP 4154: Race and Racism
Credits: 3
Instructor:
Steven Bialostok
Modality: Traditional
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
Creativity, Social Justice, and our World 

Course Description: This course is framed by a simple contradiction. Race is a myth, yet it is quite real. Racial categories are rooted in history and culturally constructed through laws, the media, and various institutions. Yet, what makes race real? What animates it with so much power, and fosters its tenacious hold on much of the Western world’s collective psyche? In this course, we explore race and racism in both its historical construction and its contemporary manifestation as a crucial aspect of American culture and an integral component of people’s identity. 


HP 4155: Diplomacy and Negotiation

Credits:
3
Instructor:
 Christopher Rothfuss
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective
USP attributes: H (Human Culture)
A&S attributes: G (Global Awareness)
Concurrent Major Honors Interdisciplinary Inquiry Concentration Designations(s):
To be announced March 2024

Course Description: This course will focus on the development and practical application of diplomacy and negotiation skills, with extensive use of real-world role-playing scenarios. Students will learn negotiation theory and techniques, and will be able to apply them through simulated bilateral and multilateral negotiation exercises. Students will also learn how to operate in a diplomatic setting and as part of a delegation. This course is primarily experiential and should prove to be stimulating and exciting for the participants.

 
 






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