Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

Apply to the University of Wyoming apply now
Visit Campus
Download UW Viewbook
Give to UW
Neuroscience research image with UW Doctoral Neuroscience Program logo on top
Menu
Contact Us

Dr. Jonathan Fox

Neuroscience Graduate Program

University of Wyoming

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307 766 9953

Email: jfox7@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

Doctoral Neuroscience Program

the uw doctoral neuroscience program: preparing students for future careers as independent scientists & educators

The University of Wyoming, Laramie offers graduate training in neuroscience leading to the Ph.D degree. The purpose is to prepare students for future careers as independent scientists, and educators. The program is interdepartmental. Faculty participants utilize diverse model species to study questions that utilize basic to translational research approaches: areas represented include neural development, behavior, learning and memory, sensory biology (link), addiction, regeneration, and neurodegeneration.

Learn more >

Doctoral students and faculty photo

Neural activity in a Swamp swallow during singing and listening
Dr. Prather’s lab studies uses combined behavioral, anatomical, electrophysiological, optogenetic and neuroimaging approaches to investigate how the brain enables us to learn. Presently, his studies are focused on the neural mechanisms that underlie how male birds learn and maintain their songs, and how female birds evaluate song quality to choose their mates.

Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration
Coeliac ganglia in two dogs that died from chronic (A) and acute (B) panautonomic degeneration (spontaneous disease in pet animals). Dr. Fox’s laboratory studies mechanisms of neurodegeneration. The main focus of his research is the role of persistent latent CNS infections in promoting neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington’s disease and brain aging. This work is a collaboration with Dr. Gigley in the department of molecular biology. As illustrated above, he also studies spontaneous dysautonomias in domestic animals.

Neural encoding mechanisms in the prefrontal cortex
A mouse brain expressing the calcium indicator GCamp6f in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is implanted with GRIN lens and mounted with a miniScope. B. Calcium imaging recorded through a miniScope from the mPFC of a freely behaving mouse. C. Representative calcium traces from twenty regions of interest. Dr. Li’s lab studies how neural activity carries information to guide behavior. The prefrontal cortex plays an essential role in planning, reasoning, decision-making, and problem-solving. Disruptions in the PFC neural circuitry are associated with behavioral abnormalities in a variety of brain disorders. Dr. Li uses miniScope in-vivo calcium imaging in freely-behaving mice, in combination with optogenetics and viral-genetic tools, to study neural circuit mechanisms of depression, autism, and dementia.

Mechanisms of brain development
Photomicrograph of an intracellularly neurobiotin-filled glutamatergic neuron (green) surrounded by genetically labeled GABAergic parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (red, tdtomato) in a mouse barrel cortex layer IV. This 2D image was a maximum projection image derived from a 3-D z-stack confocal image acquired by Dr. Xinjun Wang, a neuroscience PhD graduate from Dr. Sun’s lab. The Sun lab combines mouse genetics, imaging and electrophysiology to understand the mechanisms underlying development and related developmental brain disorders.

Spinal cord injury in Zebra fish model
Zebrafish brain illustrating upper motor neurons (green) and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (red). Spinal cord neuronal tracts (green) and migrating oligodendrocyte precursor cells (red) and innervating motor neurons (red) in in normal zebrafish (B) and following spinal trauma (C). Zebrafish have a remarkable regenerative capability making them an excellent model to study CNS injury and neurodegeneration. Dr. Mruk's lab studies the mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration following injury. We use a combination of chemical probes, genetic manipulation, microscopy, and electrophysiology to understand how locomotion returns and what genetics factors govern this process.


NEWS & UPDATES:

Congratulations to Jasper Hunt for receiving the outstanding graduating undergraduate taking the neuroscience minor option. As an undergraduate Jasper obtained research experience in the laboratory of Dr. Kara Pratt studying development of the frog visual system. This fall he will be embarking on a PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Oxford, with the eventual goal of becoming a professor of neuroscience.

Congratulations also to Dr. Baski Thyagarajan and his colleagues for obtaining an NIH R43 SBIR award titled “Development and Evaluation of a polymer coated proprietary cream formulation of resiniferatoxin nanoparticles for the Treatment of Pain Associated with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy”. (R43 DK117674-01A1)


Recent faculty publications:

Biomaterials. 2019 Apr 17;209:1-9. Localized delivery of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells to peripheral nerve allografts promotes regeneration of branched segmental defects.  Santos Roballo KC, Dhungana S, Jiang Z, Oakey J, Bushman JS.

Mitochondrion. 2019 Mar 20. doi: 10.1016/j.mito.2019.03.004. Novel proteomic changes in brain mitochondria provide insights into mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Agrawal S, Fox JH.

Williams AJ, and Sun QQ* (2019) Cortical Layer and Spectrotemporal Architecture of Epileptiform Activity in vivo in a Mouse Model of Focal Cortical Malformation. Front. Neural Circuits. fncir.2019.00002.

Contact Us

Dr. Jonathan Fox

Neuroscience Graduate Program

University of Wyoming

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307 766 9953

Email: jfox7@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
UW Operators (307) 766-1121 | Contact Us | Download Adobe Reader

Accreditation | Virtual Tour | Emergency Preparedness | Employment at UW | Gainful Employment | Privacy Policy | Harassment & Discrimination | Accessibility Accessibility information icon