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Student Handbook|Department of Theatre and Dance

Department of Theatre & Dance Handbook
(online version, updated January 2013) 

Print Handbook (View MS Word file, updated January 2013)

 

CONTENTS 

Theatre and Dance Faculty and Staff
Co-curricular Statement
 
Degree Programs Overview
Advising
 
 

DEPARTMENTAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Snowy Range Summer Theatre 
Snowy Range Summer Dance Festival 
Honors Program 
Student Organization - ASOPA 
Auditions (Professional Summer Company, RMTA, ACTF) 
Awards and Scholarships
 
 

DEPARTMENT POLICIES 

Academic Responsibility
Credit Limitations/Requirements 
Academic Probation Policy 
Department of Theatre and Dance Scholarships

Production Priorities 
Drug & Alcohol Abuse/Class
Absences 
Tips for Staying Healthy

Tips for Performers If You Feel Sick/Congested

End-of-the-Year Evaluations

 
DEGREE PROGRAMS
 

Theatre and Dance Course Offerings
BA Theatre Core Courses
BA Dance Core Courses

Theatre Degree Programs 
BFA Performance
BFA Musical Theatre  
BFA Design: Costuming
BFA Design: Lighting 
BFA Design: Scenic 
BFA Playwriting  
BFA Theatre/English
Theatre Education Endorsement

Dance Degree Programs
BFA Dance Performance 
BFA Dance Science 
 

Minor in Theatre or Dance, Course Requirements  

Special Courses
Practicum Courses in Theatre and Dance
Senior Project 
Senior Thesis


THEATRE AND DANCE FACULTY AND STAFF

Leigh Selting

Lee Hodgson

William Missouri Downs

Lou Anne Wright

Marsha Knight

Rebecca Hilliker

Margaret Wilson

Casey Kearns

Cecilia Aragon

John O’Hagan

Jennifer Deckert

Lawrence Jackson

Sharon Huizinga

Shaun Sorensen

Ginger Robertson

Patrick Newell

Don Renaud-Turner

Kathy Kirkaldie

Jack Chapman

Julia Mnaibei


Check out our faculty and staff page
to read complete bios.


CO-CURRICULAR STATEMENT

It is strongly advised that every student majoring in theatre, or selecting a dance option within the theatre major, participate actively in the University Theatre program in both technical and performance areas. Only in this way will it be possible for faculty members to have sufficient knowledge of a student's work to recommend him or her for employment or graduate study.

Students are urged to participate actively in the various co-curricular programs offered by the department. These programs provide excellent opportunities for theatre and dance students to extend their classroom studies through practical experience. With the approval and advice of the supervising faculty member, students may receive credit in Theatre 2050 and/or Theatre 4880 for their participation in such activities.

During the regular University Theatre season, four major plays and two full-length dance concerts are open to student participation. In addition, co-curricular experience may also be obtained in the many theatre and dance productions directed by students enrolled in Theatre 4250 and Theatre 4260, Theatre 4830, and Theatre 4880.

It is the philosophy of the department that theatre and dance are complementary fields of study. It is recommended that majors in either area have experience in its complementary discipline.

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DEGREE PROGRAMS, OVERVIEW

Students electing to major in Theatre and Dance have a choice of several degree programs:

  • Bachelor of Arts, or BA, with a major in Theatre and Dance.
    • Certification to teach with this degree may be obtained
      through further study in the College of Education.
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts, or BFA, in Theatre or Dance concentrations.
    • This is a Pre-Professional degree with concentrations in Performance (Acting), Costuming, Lighting, Scenic Design, Playwriting, Dance Performance, and Dance Science.
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts with Theatre/English.
    • Certification to teach with this degree may be obtained through further study in the College of Education.

Dance Degree Programs

The dance degrees within the UW Department of Theatre and Dance are designed to provide the student with a broad foundation in the humanities and a specific emphasis in the technical, performance, and production or scientific aspects of dance.  The student pursuing a degree in dance will have opportunity to attain technical competency in ballet and modern dance, to perform in dance productions, and to gain experience in dance history, dance composition, pedagogy and technical theatre as an aid to dance production. 

For the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Dance, only 50 credit hours in the major area of theatre and dance may count toward the total of 120 credit hours required for graduation.  A student who takes more than 50 hours in his/her major area may not count these hours toward graduation and must take an equivalent number of credits in some area other than the major to meet graduation requirements.  In addition to the University Studies requirements, students receive certification in 1st aid and personal safety.  The BA is considered the core course of study.   All students enter as BA students; application for the BFA programs happens at the end of the freshman year.

For the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in dance performance, students complete the core requirements for a BA, but pursue additional training in dance technique, complete a summer internship or attend a summer dance festival and complete a capstone project which may include, but is not limited to, performance, choreography, or teaching. 

For the BFA in Dance Science, students complete the dance core, enroll in introductory courses in Psychology, Kinesiology and Health and Nutrition. Students can specialize in any of these tracks with further course work. Students will complete a senior project synthesizing the scientific and artistic aspects of dance.  Both the BFA in dance performance and the BFA in Dance Science permits a total of 60-70 credits in the major as counting towards graduation.

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ADVISING

Advisors are assigned to student majors by the head of the Department of Theater and Dance. Faculty members are available for advising non-majors interested in the discipline. In order to assure progress towards the degree, students are encouraged to consult with their advisors on a regular basis.

NOTE: Students should consult with the current University Bulletin and the Student/Advisor Checklist at the end of this handbook for the various departmental, college and University Studies degree requirements. Students are responsible for thoroughly familiarizing themselves with all requirements for graduation.

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DEPARTMENTAL OPPORTUNITIES

Snowy Range Summer Theatre
 

A Summer Theatre has been in operation at the University of Wyoming since 1954. Productions are staged within a six to eight-week session in June and July. An actor or technician gains valuable practical theatre experience and receives a stipend. Company members have the option to pay up to 2 hours of academic credit if they wish.

Outstanding junior and/or senior theatre majors at UW (particularly those students seeking a professional degree) are strongly encouraged to audition for the acting company or apply for the technical company. An effort is made to select qualified students from UW to participate in the company along with students who are recruited from throughout the nation.

Auditions and interviews for the Summer Theatre Company are held at selected locations throughout the country and at UW. For further information contact:

University of Wyoming Snowy Range Summer Theatre
Department of Theatre and Dance
Department 3951
1000 E. University Avenue
Laramie, WY 82071-3951
http://www.uwyo.edu/thd/whats-playing/snowy-range-festival/

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Snowy Range Summer Dance Festival

The Snowy Range Dance Festival brings professional dance artists and companies in residence to the campus of the University of Wyoming for 11 days of intensive dance study . Guest artists, together with the reputable dance program and performing arts facilities of the University of Wyoming, provide an academic as well as a professional atmosphere for the nurturing of young and promising students of dance and the teachers who instruct them. In addition to technique classes at various levels, the week's activities include special performances, concerts, lectures, and discussion groups on current topics pertaining to all areas of the dancer's special needs. Accompanists and aspiring choreographers discover a nurturing learning environment in which to observe experienced artists at work, ask questions, and participate in special workshops in these areas. The festival is open to junior high through adults, teachers and accompanists. Scholarships are available. For more information contact:

Festival Director
University of Wyoming
Department of Theatre and Dance
Department 3951
1000 E. University Avenue
PO Box 3951, Laramie, WY 82071-3951
http://snowyrangedance.com/

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HONORS 

Students in the Department of Theatre and Dance seeking honors must enroll in the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program. The Department of Theatre and Dance completely endorses the concept of College Honors. Students enrolled in the College Honors Program must meet all criteria consistent with the requirements of that program including:

  1. Successful completion of the elected degree program, BA or BFA, with a grade point average consistent with A & S Honors requirements.
     
     
  2. Successful completion of a senior thesis. Senior thesis of sufficient challenge and merit, as determined by the faculty, may fulfill the requirement of an honors project. If so, this thesis must be written under the guidance of an approved thesis advisor with one additional faculty member serving as a member of the thesis committee.
     
     
  3. Students may elect an honors project related to a production. The successful completion of an honors project does not remove the requirement of a senior thesis. Honors projects must be submitted and approved in the spring semester of the junior year. 

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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The Associated Students of the Performing Arts (A.S.O.P.A.) is a student organization within the Department of Theatre and Dance which promotes effective communication between students and faculty, enhances the academic, performance, and social areas of student life and provides opportunities for professional exposure. A.S.O.P.A. is especially valuable to new students in acquainting them with the Department and the University as a whole. The Department of Theatre and Dance provides a close knit and cooperative environment in which to work, and A.S.O.P.A. enhances that atmosphere.

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AUDITIONS

Students who wish to audition for a paid position as an actor and who wish to utilize the members of the theatre faculty as references will be permitted to do so only after they have auditioned before the acting/directing faculty at an arranged audition. It is the student's responsibility to arrange this audition in consultation with his/her advisor.

On the basis of screened auditions the department reserves the right to recommend only those students whom, in the opinion of the faculty, have sufficient experience and ability to participate competitively at a scheduled audition. Approval to compete at one level does not automatically assume approval to compete at another level.

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DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS, OVERVIEW

The Department of Theatre and Dance has several special awards available to recognize outstanding students in acting performance, dance performance, and technical/design performance. These awards are given once a year and presented to the students during DRAM prom. The Jack Oakie acting award is for best comic performance, contributions to the department and growth as a comic actor and is in honor of Jack Oakie one of the important comic actors in early film. The acting, dance and technical design awards are for outstanding work and growth as artists and contributions to the department. Each of the three students being recognized will receive $100.00 and their names will be inscribed on our student awards plaque.

The Department of Theatre and Dance offers scholarships ranging from partial to full tuition to outstanding students in theatre and dance. For detailed information regarding scholarship assignments, the main Theatre and Dance scholarship page.

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DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES

ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITY

The Department of Theatre and Dance recognizes that many of its students are heavily committed to departmental production activities. The faculty, when possible, attempts to schedule class assignments with this commitment in mind; however, students cannot assume that production commitments take precedence over academic assignments. A production assignment, cast or crew, will not be considered an acceptable excuse for late academic assignments or absences from class.

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CREDIT LIMITATIONS/REQUIREMENTS

With the exception of the Bachelor of Fine Arts (pre-Professional), no more than 60 credit hours in the major can count toward the total of 120 credit hours (not including PE) required for graduation. A student who takes more than 50 hours in the major may not count these excess credits toward graduation and must take an equivalent number of credits in some area other than Theatre/Dance to meet graduation requirements. Theatre and Dance majors must receive a grade of C or better in all Theatre and Dance courses required for their degree.

The BA degree in Theatre and Dance requires a minimum of 15 credit hours in theatre and dance courses at the 4000 level or above. Of the total credits required for graduation, a minimum of 42 credits must be completed at the 3000 level or above.

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ACADEMIC PROBATION POLICY

It is important that when students are on academic probation that we do everything we can to assure their success at the University. Students that are on academic probation need to concentrate on grades and study skills. Production work takes time and energy away from studying. Consequently, when a student is placed on academic probation he/she will not be allowed to design, crew or act in productions the following semester. For example, if you did poorly Fall semester and were placed on academic probation at the end of that semester you will not be allowed to do production work in the Spring (even if you have already been cast in a production or asked to design one). If you receive no F's in the Spring semester and are above a 2.0 grade point average you will be allowed to work on one production the following Fall. If you continue to show academic progress in that Fall semester while doing minimal production work you will be able to return to full scale production work in the Spring.

If you are on academic probation your advisor will meet with you on a regular basis to help you improve your grades. They will do everything they can to help you get back on course and back into the creative process of doing theatre.

If you are having problems in your classes or if you are having problems with your study techniques please visit with your advisor about your difficulties before you wind up on academic probation. The University provides many special programs that deal with every aspect of learning. We can help you correct problems before you have to sacrifice production work.

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UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE SCHOLARSHIP POLICIES

The Theatre and Dance Department administers an outstanding scholarship program. Numerous awards are available to qualified students who intend to major in Dance or Theatre. The scholarship provides resident or non-resident tuition waiver amounts ranging up to full tuition for the academic year. All interested students are encouraged to apply.

Further information on the scholarship is available from the Division of Student Financial Aids of the University of Wyoming.


APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Scholarships are awarded for one academic year, beginning in the Fall semester. Students must therefore re-apply each year and audition in front of the Theatre and Dance faculty if they wish to be considered for a scholarship for the following year, regardless of whether or not they hold or have previously held a Theatre and Dance scholarship. While awarded for a full academic year, scholarships may be revoked at the end of the fall or spring semester for either of the following reasons:

  1. Failure by the student to maintain a 2.0 GPA in all courses.

  2. Failure by the student to fulfill his or her production responsibilities as a scholarship student as specified in the Student Handbook 

In the event the student fails to fulfill obligations in numbers 1 or 2 above, the faculty reserves the right to vote, after consultation with the scholarship director, to place the student on probation for one semester for not meeting the established criteria. This probationary period is not guaranteed, and solely at the discretion of the faculty vote.

For instructions on How to Apply for a Theatre and Dance scholarship, click here .

Please refer to the UW Theatre & Dance scholarship homepage for more information before you apply online

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SCHOLARSHIP GUIDELINES

  I. Philosophy
The scholarship program is designed to financially assist the outstanding student of theatre and dance and to attract him/her for study at the University of Wyoming. Students should look upon themselves as undergraduate departmental aids who contribute to the theatre and dance program here at Wyoming.

II. Requirements
A. Theatre/Dance major
B. Maintenance of an overall cumulative 2.0 grade point average.
C. Suitable progress toward the degree goal; student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours per year (12 months). Scholarship may be retained for 8 semesters.
D. Satisfactory fulfillment of assigned responsibilities for departmental productions.
E. Must attend all scholarship meetings
F. To further the theatre and dance experience, scholarship students will be required to audition for all main season productions. Exceptions will be made for technical/design students and the theatre major auditioning for a dance production and vice versa; unless the choreographer or director posts audition requirements to the contrary. A role may be rejected by petitioning a fact-finding panel, which shall consist of two faculty members and three elected scholarship students.

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III. Scholarship Assignments
The assignments will be of a definite "job" nature. Scholarship assignments will be made for each production at the earliest possible time and, whenever possible, before actual work begins on that production. The student will be given his/her preference of job assignment whenever possible; however, the student should also be willing to accept a wide range of responsibilities so that he/she receives a variety of experiences. Every effort will be made by the department to keep demands on the time of scholarship students reasonable. Scholarship students should expect to serve in some capacity, be it running crew or actor, on a minimum of two main season productions each semester. If either of these options is impossible during the semester, the student may petition the scholarship director to complete a crew assignment by working 40 hours in a shop under the supervision of the shop administrators. The petition must be presented as near to the beginning of the affected semester as possible to facilitate any reassignments that are necessary. Petitions received after crew assignments are posted are not guaranteed consideration.

The following is a short description of specific crew positions, with information as to duties, responsibilities and time commitments for each. ALL ASSIGNMENTS INCLUDE REQUIRED ATTENDANCE AT ALL TECHNICAL REHEARSALS, PERFORMANCES, AND STRIKE.

  • Stage Manager -- Assist production director in all aspects of rehearsal and production. Duties would include calling the show in all performances. Other duties might include typing and posting rehearsal lists, notes and contact sheets; giving lines during rehearsals, giving and correcting blocking assignments. This position requires involvement from the very beginning of the rehearsal process.
  • Assistant Stage Manager
    Main responsibility is to provide a communication link between the stage and the control booth.
  • Light Board Operator
    Operate computerized or manual lighting control board as assigned by lighting designer.
  • Sound Board Operator
    Operate soundboard and execute all assigned production sound cues.
  • Master Carpenter
    Supervise all scenery shifts and crews assigned to shifts.
  •  Master Electrician
    Supervise all production electrical needs and crews.
  • Properties Master
    Ensure all show props are in place and functioning. Prepare food as necessary. Operate special effects.
  • Shift Crew -- Move scenery as required by each production.
  • Electrician -- Operate electrical equipment as required by each production. Duties might include changing bulbs, color in lighting equipment or operating telephones.
  • Flyman -- Operate rigging necessary to shift flown scenery.
  • Costume Running Crew -- Duties include making minor repairs to costumes during the run of the show, assisting actors with costumes as required, maintenance of the dressing rooms, and daily laundry.
  • Makeup Running Crew -- Duties will include make-up assistance, hair dressing, maintenance of the makeup room and the makeup cabinet, and daily maintenance of wigs (if applicable).
  • House Manager -- The House Manager is responsible for maintaining the Box Office during the actual production. Duties include audience control, assisting in the Box Office, supervising the ushers, and working with the Stage Manager to orchestrate intermissions. House Manager's appearance when working should be professional. Time commitment may begin when the Box Office opens for ticket sales if necessary, and continue through the run of the production.
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IV. Scholarship/Work-Study
Students awarded scholarships are not encouraged to hold Work-Study positions. If it is a financial necessity that a scholarship student supplements his/her earnings with Work-Study, scholarship requirements and responsibilities must be claimed first and Work-Study hours second. Students will not be able to fulfill scholarship commitments with Work-Study hours.

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V. Dance - Scholarship Responsibilities
Dance scholarship students will work on a crew or perform a role for a maximum of two non-dance productions during each year, with their remaining scholarship responsibilities being fulfilled by their participation in the dance production. The requirement will be a total of 100 units per semester.

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VI. Scholarship Meetings
All Scholarship students must attend all scholarship meetings unless they have made previous arrangements with the appropriate designer or technical director. Arrangements must be made at least 48 hours in advance of the scheduled meeting. Scholarship meetings are crucial to the scheduling and the organization of the student's time and to the production.

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VII. Reapplication
All scholarships will automatically become open at the end of each academic year. Therefore, anyone who wishes a scholarship for the following academic year must apply or reapply each spring at a time specified by the faculty. An effort will be made to fill approximately 25% of the scholarships with incoming freshmen or students transferring from other colleges.
An audition or portfolio interview will be required of all students. The audition/interview will take place in the spring semester before the entire theatre and dance faculty.

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VIII. Faculty Assessment of Scholarship Students
Due to the increased competition for scholarships, it is necessary that the faculty assess the work of scholarship students at the end of the fall semester and at the time of spring applications. This assessment will be based on the following:

A. The fulfillment by scholarship students of the requirements in parts A, B, C, D, and E
section II.

B. The assessment of students' work in fulfilling the requirements in part F, section II. This assessment, based on the recommendations of faculty members who have worked with scholarship students in production, will of necessity be fundamentally subjective.

A theatre and dance scholarship is intended to financially assist the theatre and dance student whose work is outstanding both in class and in production. Any assessment will be based on a balance of these two parts of a student's work. Outstanding work in production is usually based more strongly on the attitude of the student doing the work than on the skill that the student may have in any particular job.

Production work, whether artistically stimulating or rather dull, must be done well and on time if the production is to be successful and if all those working on the production are to gain maximum educational benefit. Therefore, a student who seeks to contribute more positively and consistently to the qualitative completion of a job will be assessed more favorably than a student who works the minimum time required or who seeks to do only certain kinds of work.

The faculty may, at the end of the fall semester, withdraw aid from any student who, in the opinion of the faculty, has not satisfactorily fulfilled all of the requirements for that scholarship. Should the scholarship administrator and/or any other member of the faculty recommend such a revocation, the student(s) involved will be notified in writing and given seven days to request a hearing and review before a departmental fact finding panel. A panel, consisting of three scholarship students and two faculty members appointed by the department head in consultation with the faculty, will seek to determine the merits of both the recommendation for revocation of the scholarship and the appeal of the student involved. The panel will present its recommendation to the entire faculty, which will then vote on the matter. The faculty vote will be final.


 AUDITIONS TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS – ACTING

  • You have a maximum of 5 minutes. We would prefer to see you perform two contrasting monologues, each about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes in length. By contrasting, we mean material that utilizes different sides of you as a performer. This contrast could mean one serious and one comic piece, or one contemporary/modern language piece coupled with a classical piece, (Shakespeare, Moliere, etc.). If you would like to sing, please do. A tape player will be provided, and usually 16 measures or one verse is sufficient. Please sing a song from a musical, not a top 40 hit, and remember, songs must be acted too!
  • Avoid Shakespeare unless you have experience and feel comfortable with it. Without more training, we don't expect you to present this difficult material, but if you feel comfortable and confident with it, by all means go ahead!
  • Do material that shows off your best and strongest skills as a performer— that's what we want to see! For example, are you funny? Do you have good comic sense/timing? A strong sense of your own physicality? Can you present honest and grounded work? Do you have a sense of vulnerability? Can you incorporate a strength or weakness in your character as called for in the text? Can you do all of these without always making the cliche choice? Are you creative? These are things we are trying to discern in your audition!
  • Work with your drama teacher to put together the best audition possible. Show them these guidelines, and by all means, have them call us if they have any questions. (307-766-2198) WE WANT YOU TO DO YOUR BEST! Many times, we see students bring in Speech cuttings that have been successful at their speech meets throughout the year. While these do show off skills, we prefer to see material from plays, that have fully developed characters. Novels, stories, poems, etc., are not usually meant to be performed, but read. Acting is action, and plays provide that type of material.
  • When you audition, we like to make it as relaxed as possible for you. A group of faculty can be intimidating, but please remember we want you to do your best! We like to see talent! Wear something that is flattering to you, but also comfortable. If you don't feel right in nylons and heels, don't wear them. Suits and ties are nice, but if they restrict your audition in any way, choose something else. Be sure to introduce the names of your selections at the beginning of your audition, as well as telling us your name. Don't describe the scene or setting you are about to do, just do it! Most of the time, we are familiar with the plays you choose. If not, a short description, (as we see in many speech cuttings) won't help that much anyway.
  •  Finally, stay around and chat with our faculty. Get to know us, and allow us to get to know you! Mature, serious, and creative students make the best candidates for scholarships, and whatever you can show us during those two days will help. Talk with our students, look at the facilities, take in a show if possible, and sit in on our classes if you can make the time for it. We want you to be happy with your choice of school! Break a leg!

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AUDITION TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS - TECHNICAL/DESIGN MAJORS

For the scholarship audition, you will be asked to present formally (1) a portfolio of your work to date and (2) to provide a resume.

Begin with an introduction of yourself, where you are from, and where you are in your training. Briefly discuss your goals as a technician or designer. Then go on and present your actual materials. You have a maximum of 10 minutes.

A few general recommendations:

  • Appearance is important.Dress well, in something that is flattering to you, but comfortable. Ladies, if you don't feel right in nylons and heels, don't wear them! Suits and ties are nice for men, but if they restrict your presentation in any way, choose something else.
  • Be as neat and meticulous as possible with your visual materials for presentation. Your visual presentation is a reflection of your organizational skills.
  • Be extremely positive when discussing your work. You should exude a positive self-image and a sense of enthusiasm for your career and your work.
  • Don't just show your photographs or renderings: provide a brief explanation of why you think this project was special or significant.
  • In terms of layout, general practice is to list your best skills first. The same is true of your resume. List your most current experience (which should reflect your best work) and work backwards.
  • And finally, practice your presentation. Portfolio material is difficult to handle. You will stay much better poised if you have handled it previously.

When you audition, we like to make it as relaxed as possible for you. A group of faculty can be intimidating, but please remember we want you to do your best! We like to see talent! We also hope that after the auditions you'll stay around and chat with our faculty during an informal reception. Get to know us, and allow us to get to know you! Mature, serious, and creative students make the best candidates for scholarships, and whatever you can show us during the time you are here will help. Come a day before auditions, talk with our students, look at the facilities, take in a show if possible. Again, we want you to be happy with your choice of school!

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AUDITION TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS - DANCE

Students auditioning for dance scholarships should prepare one dance piece, two minutes in length, in the style of your choice (modern, ballet, or jazz).

The genre chosen should consist of movement that is exemplary of your training background and should demonstrate your personal style as a performer.

If you tap, we would be delighted to see an additional short (one minute or less) selection demonstrating your ability. We will provide a CD/tape player for your audition. Please come prepared with your music cued-up and ready to go.

Students are often worried about how to get audition material together and whose choreography they can use. You may choreograph your own audition material, or you might look to your dance teacher for help in this area.

Be sure to introduce yourself just before you begin your audition piece, state the music and the composer's name which you have selected for accompaniment, and the choreographer of your piece.

When you audition, we like to make it as relaxed as possible for you. A group of faculty can be very intimidating, so remember we want you to do your best! Simple leotards and tights are appropriate attire for your scholarship audition.

If you are a dancer with a background in theatre, do feel free to participate in the theatre auditions. We are a theatre AND dance department, demonstrations and strength in both areas will only help you in your chances of attaining a scholarship. Refer to the separate sheet on acting/performance audition tips.

After the auditions, we may ask questions about your goals, interests and background. Mature, serious, and creative students make the best candidates for scholarships, and whatever you can show us during your time here will help. We welcome questions and conversation about our program, the university, financial aid, etc. Talk with our students, look at the facilities, and see a performance if possible.

Keep in mind, prospective students are welcome to visit campus anytime and are invited to participate in or observe a class.

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PRODUCTION PRIORITIES 

FIRST: The present structure of a minimum of six productions including dance and musical theatre/opera.

SECOND: Local performance of the Cultural Outreach dance or theatre tour and/or projects resulting from course work in dance composition classes or those in the directing class.

THIRD: Senior/honors projects.

FOURTH: Additional productions by theatre faculty including THEA 4060.

FIFTH: Production proposals involving other academic units.

Adopted by faculty – Spring 2001

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DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE

Any student who, through the use of alcohol or drugs, is unable to perform his/her responsibilities as an actor or technician, will automatically be suspended from participation in all departmentally sponsored activities for one year from the date of the infraction. The suspension will take effect immediately. Students holding scholarships will automatically have their scholarships terminated.

Departmentally sponsored activities shall be construed as meaning any activity in which departmental resources or department space or equipment is employed.
 

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CLASS ABSENCES

The Department of Theatre and Dance recognizes that many of its students are heavily committed to departmental production activities. The faculty, when possible, attempts to schedule class assignments with this commitment in mind; however, students cannot assume that production commitments take precedence over academic assignments. A production assignment, cast or crew, will not be considered an acceptable excuse for late academic assignments or absences from classes. 

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TIPS FOR STAYING HEALTHY

NOTE: IF YOU HAVE PRE-EXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS (SUCH AS ALLERGIES OR IMMUNE SYSTEM ISSUES) CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE TAKING SUPPLEMENTS OR CHANGING DIET AND EXERCISE ROUTINES.

Wash your hands often.  Practice good hand hygiene and always wash after coughing, sneezing, and using the restroom (if you can’t do this, use hand sanitizer – KMART & WAL-MART have travel sizes you can keep in your pocket/briefcase/purse.)

Keep tissues with which to cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough, then toss the tissue.  Urge others in the dept./company to do the same. If you don’t have tissues, use your hand(s) to cover your mouth and wash your hands straightaway.  NOTE:  Germs love handles on restroom doors and shopping carts, so avoid touching your face (especially nose, mouth, and eyes) after immediate contact with these.

GET A FLU SHOT! Be sure to consult with a physician or the Student Health office for these.  They may not be appropriate for all people, including those allergic to eggs.

Get your sleep.  It may not seem possible to get adequate sleep when you feel overwhelmed with schoolwork and rehearsal, but try to work in catnaps when you can.  Also, sometimes simply resting (sitting back and meditating in a quiet place) can recharge your body and mind.

Take your vitamins.  If you don’t like them or can’t afford them, try to eat citrus fruits, drink orange juice or squeeze some lemon juice into your bottled water.  If you work even a little vitamin C into your daily routine, it will pay off.  Also, the less junk you eat, the less tired you’ll feel.  NOTE:  Herbal supplements are available, but be aware that some (like Echinacea) thin your blood, so don’t take them if you have preexisting medical conditions or before surgery.

Stretch or exercise daily.  20 minutes of walking (or a dance class) will help keep the creeping crud at bay.  STRETCHING AND WARMING UP BEFORE A SHOW WILL HELP YOU BREATHE EASIER AND MORE EFFICIENTLY DURING PERFORMANCE AND HAVE MORE SPEECH (MOUTH AND RESONATOR) MOBILITY.

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TIPS FOR PERFORMERS IF YOU FEEL SICK/CONGESTED

  • If you feel tired or on the cusp of a cold, you might try Emer’gen-C, a vitamin drink you add to water. You might also try teas that are blended to soothe sore and scratchy voices – Throat Coat and Goldenseal are two.
  • Try inhaling steam from your warm showers, turn on a humidifier when you sleep, eat fruits and soup, and up your daily intake of water.  If at all possible, go on vocal rest before performances and, most importantly, get at least 8 hours of sleep a night.
  • If you are sick during performance, do NOT use Chloroseptic or other numbing sprays and lozenges before you go on stage.  Do sip bottled water and take Aspirin or Advil if appropriate.  It’s okay to use numbing agents to relieve symptoms so you can sleep.
  • Gargling with 1/4 teaspoon salt to 8 oz. Water may help alleviate the feeling of heaviness you get with respiratory secretions.
  • Expectorants (eg, plain Robitussin without any cough suppressants) containing the active ingredient Guaifenesin may help thin secretions.
  • Avoid milk, ice cream, chocolate and highly spiced foods – they may make your respiratory secretions more viscous or irritate the mucosal lining.
  • Avoid OTC cold and allergy meds unless you are under doctor’s orders.  Many of these contain antihistamines that dry out the mucosa of the larynx.
  • Drink lots of water
  • Coughing and throat clearing are the worst things you can do to your voice when you are ill and must perform.  In fact, they’re not good for a healthy voice.  Here are a few tips to help you avoid them when you’re feeling less than tip-top:
    • Sip warm or tepid water.  This may help free the mucous and help you not to cough.
    • For a sore throat, take a sip of ice water and hold it under your tongue for a few moments.  It may help improve circulation to your mouth and throat and make you feel less like clearing your throat.
    • Try the “silent” cough method.  This is a “big wheeze” so instead of slamming your vocals folds together (as happens when you cough), allow the muscles of your abdomen to contract a they normally would for a cough while keeping your vocal folds apart.  The resulting sound will be a wheeze.
    • If you must clear your throat, try the “Felix Ungar” method:  pitch up as you clear your throat lightly.  Yes, it makes you sound like a complete idiot, but it’s worth a try if you’re in vocal trouble.

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END-OF-THE-YEAR EVALUATIONS 

All theatre and dance majors (freshmen through seniors) are REQUIRED to prepare a performance/presentation to be reviewed by the entire faculty at the end of each year. This includes Theatre/English majors. The dates for these evaluations will be set early in the year at the same time as the departmental calendar. Please discuss these evaluations with your advisors early in the Spring semester so that you will be well prepared. Your advisor will be able to provide you with additional information regarding portfolios, resumes, etc.

This is an opportunity for faculty who have not had you in class during the year to see how well you are progressing, to discuss any potential problems with course work, and to make recommendations with regard to your development. It is also an opportunity for us to see the level of your maturity and poise and to discuss assignment of future projects which require individual responsibility such as stage managing, designing, assistant directing, etc.  

THEATRE PERFORMANCE MAJORS

Freshmen
Freshmen must prepare one contemporary monologue not to exceed 2 minutes, and bring a resume. They will remain for an additional 3-4 minute feedback session, led by the acting faculty.

Sophomores

Sophomores will perform two contrasting contemporary monologues not to exceed 4 minutes and bring a resume. They will remain for an additional 3-4 minute feedback session, led by the acting faculty.

Juniors and Non-Graduating Seniors

Juniors must prepare two contrasting monologues; one must be classical (Shakespeare, Moliere, Shaw, Jonson, Sheridan, etc.) not to exceed 3 minutes in length. In addition all juniors in the performance concentration must provide a photo and resume.

Seniors
(includes Performance, Design/Technical, Dance, Theatre/English, & Playwriting)
Seniors will participate in an external interview and survey process, facilitated by the Center for Teaching Excellence. Details will be posted near the end of the spring semester. Non-graduating Seniors must participate using the Junior guidelines above.

* Pay close attention to time limits. You WILL BE STOPPED if you exceed the limit.
* Any performance major may sing in place of a contemporary piece
 

DANCE MAJORS

Dance majors at all levels will prepare their end of the year evaluations under the guidance of their individual technique teachers in their classes. The specific material will be the responsibility of the technique teacher. The pieces will be presented to the faculty in a group showing at the allotted time. All dance majors are required to submit a resume.
 

TECHNICAL/DESIGN MAJORS

For End of the Year Evaluations you will be asked to formally present a portfolio of your work to date and to provide a resume. Begin with an introduction of yourself and a statement of where you are in your training. Briefly discuss your goals as a technician or designer. Then go on and present your actual materials.

With freshman, sophomores, and juniors we are interested primarily in your progress and development. So don't be afraid to show beginning level work and to discuss how you feel you have grown from project to project. Always keep in mind the final goal, however--preparation for entering the job market. This will also keep you prepared in case you want to interview for an internship at an earlier stage of your development. By the time that you are a senior you should have narrowed your portfolio down to your best work, have it in a polished and well-defined form and have developed a mature presentation style.
 

A few general recommendations: 

1. Appearance is important. Dress well.

2. Be as neat and meticulous as possible with your visual materials for presentation. Your visual presentation is a reflection of your organizational skills.

3. Be extremely positive when discussing your work. You should exude a positive self-image and a sense of enthusiasm for your career and for your work.

4. Make an investment in a good portfolio. Think of it as an investment in your future. If you start putting together your materials at an early stage they will be in excellent shape by the time you graduate. If you start the process early we can make suggestions of how your can clarify the presentation of your materials.

5. As a beginner you are going to have to depend in part upon course projects for portfolio materials. The more meticulous and careful you are with your projects the more impressive they will be in your portfolios. Always keep your best work in immaculate condition. Begin immediately to think about what best expresses your abilities. Take close up photographs of the work you do for production.

6. Don't just show your photographs or renderings. Provide a brief explanation of why you think
this project was special or significant.

7. In terms of Layout, general practice is to list your best skills first. The same is true of your resume. List your most current experience (which should reflect your best work) and work backwards.

8. A copy of "Critical Tips for Composing a Technical/ Design Portfolio and Resume" is available in the office and should help you get started.

9. And finally, practice your presentation. Portfolio material is difficult to handle. You will stay much better poised if you have handled it previously.

10. See resume samples (coming soon).
 

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DEGREE PROGRAMS

THEATRE AND DANCE COURSE OFFERINGS
Offered
 

Course # 

Course Title 

Prerequisite 

Fall, Summer, Spring 

We have indicated after the course title if a specific course meets a University Studies requirement,
such as CA, G, etc.
 

1000 

Introduction to the Theatre (CA) 

 

F/S 

1020 

IC for Theatre and Dance (I) 

 

F/S 

1021 

Academic/Professional Issues (I,L) 

  

F 

1040 

Production Crew I 

consent 

F/S 

1100 

Beginning Acting (CA)  

 

F/S 

1200 

Introduction to Stage Design 

 

F 

1340 

Musical Theatre Class Voice  

  

F 

1405 

Introduction to Pilates Training  

consent 

S 

1410 

Ballet I/I (CA) 

 

F/Su/S 

1420 

Ballet I/II (CA) 

1410  

S 

1430 

Modern Dance I (CA) 

 

F/S 

1440 

Modern Dance I/II (CA) 

1430  

S 

1450 

Beginning Tap Dance 

 

S 

1470 

Men’s Technique 

 

F/S 

1480 

Beginning Jazz 

 

F/S 

1700 

Voice for the Actor 

1100 or consent 

S 

2010 

Theatrical Backgrounds Drama I 

 

F 

2020 

Theatrical Backgrounds Drama II 

2010 or consent  

S 

2040 

Production Crew II 

1040 

F/S 

2050 

Theatre Practice 

consent  

F/S 

2050 

Performance Credit   

consent 

F/S 

2050-02  

Dance Styles  

consent  

F/S 

2145 

Costume Construction  

  

F/S 

2150  

Drafting for Design  

 

F 

2160  

Stage Makeup  

1100 or consent  

F 

2170  

Speech for the Actor  

 

F 

2180 

Costume Crafts  

 

 

2200  

Backgrounds of Dance (CA, G)  

 

F 

2220  

Stagecraft  

 

F/S 

2240  

Stage Production  

2220 

F 

2250  

Computer Auto Design I  

1200 and 2150  

S 

2400  

Vertical Dance I  

consent  

S 

2410  

Ballet II/I  

consent  

F 

2420  

Ballet II/II  

consent  

S 

2430 

Modern Dance II/I 

1140 

F 

2440 

Modern Dance II/II  

2430 

S 

2450 * 

 Tap II  

1450 and consent  

S 

2480 + 

 Jazz II  

1480 and consent  

S 

2800  

Stage Lighting I  

1200, 2200  

F/S 

2810 

Scenic Painting  

 

 

2900 

Console Programming  

 

 

2990 

Period Styles in Design for Theatre  

 

 

3020 

Foundations of Teaching Dance  

 

 

3025  

Teaching Creative Movement (CA)  

3440, KIN 1000 and 1025, GPA 2.5  

S 

3100  

Kinesiology for Dance  

consent and PEPR 2040  

F (every 4th sem) 

3160 

Advanced Makeup  

 

 

3400  

Vertical Dance II  

consent  

F 

3410  

Classical Ballet III/I  

1420 and consent  

F 

3420  

Classical Ballet III/II  

3410 and consent  

S 

3430  

Modern Dance III/I  

1440 and consent  

F 

3440  

Modern Dance III/II  

3430 and consent  

S 

3480  

Jazz III/I  

2480  

F 

3490  

Jazz III/II  

3480 

S 

3500  

Playwriting/Screenwriting  

WA, 1000 and 1100  

S 

3720 *  

Stage Movement/Combat I   

1100 

F 

3730  

Intermediate Acting   

1100, 2010, 2020 

F 

3740  

Acting Styles  

1100 and 3730  

S 

3750  

Acting for the Camera  

1100 and 3730 

F 

3790  

Stage Management  

1100, 1200, and 2220  

F 

3805 

Stage Lighting II  

 

 

3810  

Scene Design  

1200, 2220 or consent 

S 

3820  

Stage Costuming I  

1200, 2010, 2020, 3730/consent 

S 

3840 

Historical Draping  

 

 

3850 

Design and Technology Seminar  

 

 

3890 

Lighting CAD  

 

 

3910  

20th Century Theatre Diversity (CA, D) 

1000  

S 

3950*  

Dialects for the Actor  

1100, 1700, and 2170  

S 

4000*  

Character Dance  

3410  

S 

4001+  

Historical Dance  

3420  

F 

4010  

Advanced Ballet  

3420  

F/S 

4030  

Advanced Modern Dance  

3440  

F/S 

4200  

20th Century Dance (CA, WC)  

2200  

S  

4250 *  

Beginning Dance Composition  

2420, 2440  

F 

4260 +  

Intermediate Dance Composition   

4250 and consent 

F/S 

4500  

Advanced Playwriting  

3500  

F 

4700 

Auditioning and Careers in Dance  

 

 

4710 *  

Advanced Scene Study  

3740/consent  

S 

4720  

Auditioning & Professional Issues 

1100, 3730, 3740 

F 

4730 *  

Stage Movement/Combat II  

100 and 3720  

S 

4750  

Computer Auto Design II  

2250 and 2800  

S 

4770  

Summer Theatre  

12 hrs in THEA/consent  

Su 

4800 *  

Advanced Stage Lighting  

2800 

S 

4810 +  

Advanced Scenic Design  

3810, 3820, 4820  

S  

4820  

Directing I  

2010, 2020, 3730, 3810  

F 

4830 *  

Directing II  

4820/consent  

S 

4845 

Fit and Alteration  

 

 

4850  

Stage Costuming II  

3820 

S 

4880  

Advanced Theatre Practice  

12 hrs in THEA and consent 

F/S 

4880-01  

Independent Study in Theatre  

Consent  

F/S 

4880-04  

Dance Pedagogy I  

Consent  

F 

4880-05  

Dance Pedagogy II  

Consent  

S 

4880-06  

Dance Pedagogy III  

Consent  

F 

4880-07  

Dance Pedagogy IV  

Consent  

S 

4930  

Theatre History I (WC)  

2010, 2020, 6 hrs in THEA  

F  

4940  

Theatre History II  

4930 

S 

4950  

Senior Thesis  

Senior standing  

F/S 

4990  

Research in Theatre  

6 hrs in area of research and consent  

F/S  

4990  

Voice II  

1700 

F 

4990-03  

Musical Theatre Workshop  

  

F 

Please note the following designations following certain courses:
* These courses are offered on alternating school years where the fall semester is an odd year.
+ These courses are offered on alternating school years where the fall semester is an even year.
 






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BA IN THEATRE
 

The following courses are the required courses for a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. 

Credits 

Course# 

Title 

.5  

1040  

Production Crew I  

3  

1100  

Beginning Acting 

3  

1200  

Introduction to Stage Design 

3  

2010  

Theatrical Backgrounds Drama I 

3  

2020  

Theatrical Backgrounds Drama II 

.5  

2040 

Production Crew II 

3  

2220  

Stagecraft 

3  

2800  

Stage Lighting I  

3  

3730  

Intermediate Acting 

3  

3740  

Acting Styles 

3  

3810  

Scene Design 

3  

3820  

Stage Costuming I 

3  

4820 

Directing I 

3  

4930 

Theatre History I 

3  

4940  

Theatre History II 

Total required credits: 40  

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BA IN DANCE

The following are the required courses for students electing the BA in Dance. 

Credits  Course#  Title 
1  1021  Academic and Professional Issues in Dance  
.5   1040   Production Crew I  
3  1200   Introduction to Stage Design   
1  1405  Introduction to Pilates Training  
1   1420   Ballet I/II  
1  1440   Modern Dance I/II   
1  1450   Beginning Tap Dance   
1   1480   Beginning Jazz  
.5   2040   Production Crew II  
1   2050   Theatre Practice  
3   2200   Backgrounds of Dance  
1  2480   Jazz II   
2  3100   Kinesiology for Dance   
1  3410   Classical Ballet III/I  
1  3420   Classical Ballet III/II  
1  3430   Modern Dance III/I  
1  3440   Modern Dance III/II  
1  3480  Jazz III  
4  4010   Advanced Ballet  
4  4030   Advanced Modern Dance  
8    (additional 8 credits total in any combination of 4010 and 4030) 
3  4200   20th Century Dance  
2  4250   Beginning Dance Composition  
2  4260   Intermediate Dance Composition  
1  4880  Dance Pedagogy I  
1  4880-6   Dance Pedagogy II  
The following courses outside the department are also required: 
Credits  Course#  Title 
4  BIOL 1010    General Biology*  
2  HLED 1221    Standard First Aid & Personal Safety or current certification  
4  ZOO 2040   Human Anatomy  
* simultaneously fulfills University Studies requirement SB: Biological Sciences. 

Total required credits: 57  
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THEATRE DEGREE PROGRAMS

BFA THEATRE
Performance Concentration

The following courses are the required courses for a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Performance (Acting).

Credits 

Course# 

Title 

.5 

1040 

Production Crew I  

3 

1100 

Beginning Acting  

3 

1200 

Introduction to Stage Design  

2 

1700 

Voice for the Actor 

3 

2010 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  

3 

2020 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II  

.5 

2040 

Production Crew II 

3  

2160 

Stage Makeup 

2  

2170 

Speech for the Actor  

3 

2220 

Stagecraft 

2  

3720  

Stage Movement/Combat I 

3 

3730 

Intermediate Acting  

3 

3740 

Acting Styles  

3 

3750 

Acting for the Camera  

3 

3790 

Stage Management  

3 

3950 

Dialects for the Actor  

3  

4710  

Advanced Scene Study 

3  

4720  

Auditioning & Professional Issues 

2  

4730 

 Stage Movement/Combat II 

3 

4820 

Directing I  

3 

4930 

Theatre History I  

3 

4940 

Theatre History II  


AND THREE HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING
 

1  

1410  

Ballet I 

1  

1430  

Modern Dance I 

1  

1450  

Beginning Tap Dance 

1  

1480  

Beginning Jazz  

Total required credits: 60  

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BFA THEATRE
Musical Theatre Concentration

The following courses are the required courses for a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Musical Theatre.
 

Credits 

Course# 

Title 

.5 

1040 

Production Crew I  

3 

1100 

Beginning Acting  

3 

1200 

Introduction to Stage Design  

4 

1300 

Musical Theatre Workshop (four semesters)  

3 

1360 

Fundamentals of Music for Theatre Majors  

2 

1700 

Voice for the Actor 

3 

2010 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  

3 

2020 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II  

.5 

2040 

Production Crew II 

3  

2160 

Stage Makeup 

2  

2170 

Speech for the Actor  

3 

2220 

Stagecraft 

6 

2340 

Musical Theatre Voice Lesson (six semesters)  

2  

3720  

Stage Movement/Combat I 

3 

3730 

Intermediate Acting  

3 

3740 

Acting Styles  

3 

3790 

Stage Management  

3 

3950 

Dialects for the Actor  

3  

4710  

Advanced Scene Study 

3  

4720  

Auditioning & Professional Issues 

2  

4730 

 Stage Movement/Combat II 

3 

4820 

Directing I  

3 

4940 

Theatre History II  

3 

4330 

History of American Musical Theatre  


AND THREE HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING
 

1  

1410  

Ballet I 

1  

1430  

Modern Dance I 

1  

1450  

Beginning Tap Dance 

1  

1480  

Beginning Jazz  

2 (PLUS TWO ADDITIONAL DANCE COURSES IN AREA OF CHOICE)  

Total required credits: 70  

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BFA THEATRE
Costuming Concentration

The following are the required courses for students electing the BFA in Theatre, Costuming Concentration.
 

Credits 

Course# 

Title 

.5 

1040 

Production Crew I  

3 

1100 

Beginning Acting  

3 

2010 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  

3 

2020 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II 

.5 

2040 

Production Crew II 

3  

2145 

Costume Construction  

2  

2160  

Stage Makeup  

3  

2180 

Costume Crafts  

3 

2220 

Stagecraft 

3 

2800 

Stage Lighting I  

3 

2900 

Period Styles in Design for Theatre  

3 

3790 

Stage Management  

3 

3810 

Scene Design  

3 

3820 

Stage Costuming I  

3 

3840 

Historical Draping  

2 

3850 

Design and Technology Seminar  

3 

4845 

Fit and Alteration  

3 

4850 

Stage Costuming II  

3 

4930 

Theatre History I  

3 

4940 

Theatre History II  

 

 

 

3 

ART 1005  

Drawing I  

3 

ART 2010  

Art History I  

  

  

  

3 

FCSC 3174  

Flat Pattern Design OR  

3 

FCSC 3175  

Drafting and Draping  

Total required credits: 65 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

3 

2810 

Scenic Painting 

3 

3160 

Advanced Makeup  

3 

3730 

Intermediate Acting  

3 

4820 

Directing I  

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BFA THEATRE 
Lighting Concentration

The following are the required courses for students electing the BFA in Theatre, Lighting Concentration. 

Credits 

Course# 

Title 

.5 

1040 

Production Crew I  

3 

1100 

Beginning Acting  

3 

2010 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  

3 

2020 

Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II 

.5 

2040 

Production Crew II 

3  

2145 

Costume Construction  

  

  

OR 

3 

2180 

Costume Crafts  

2  

2150 

Drafting for Design  

3  

2220 

Stagecraft 

3 

2250 

Computer Assisted Design I  

3 

2800 

Stage Lighting I  

3 

2900 

Console Programming  

3 

3790 

Stage Management  

3 

3805 

Stage Lighting II  

3 

3810 

Scenic Design  

2

3850 

Design and Technology Seminar 

3 

3890 

Lighting CAD  

3 

4800 

Stage Lighting -- Production  

3 

4930 

Theatre History I  

3 

4940 

Theatre History II  

  

  

  

3 

ART 1005  

Drawing I  

3 

ART 2010  

Art History I  

3 

ART 2020 

Art History II 

Total required credits: 63 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

1 

2400 

Vertical Dance I  

3 

4810 

Advanced Scene Design  

3 

4820 

Directing I  

  



BFA THEATRE
Scenic Concentration
The following are the required courses for students electing the BFA in Theatre, Scenic Concentration. 
Credits  Course#  Title 
.5  1040  Production Crew I  
3  1100  Beginning Acting  
3  2010  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  
3  2020  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II 
.5  2040  Production Crew II 
3   2145  Costume Construction  
      OR 
3  2180  Costume Crafts  
2   2150  Drafting for Design  
3   2220  Stagecraft 
3  2250  Computer Assisted Design I  
3  2800  Stage Lighting I  
3  2810  Scenic Painting  
3  2990  Period Styles in Design for Theatre  
3  3790  Stage Management  
3  3810  Scenic Design  
3  3820  Stage Costuming I  
2  3850  Design and Technology Seminar 
3  4810  Advanced Scene Design  
3  4820  Directing I  
3  4930  Theatre History I  
3  4940  Theatre History II  
3  ART 1005   Drawing I  
3  ART 2010   Art History I  
3  ART 2020  Art History II 
Total required credits: 63  RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 
3  3030  History of Architecture  
 

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BFA THEATRE
Playwriting Concentration

The following are the required courses for students electing the BFA in Theatre, Playwriting Concentration.
 
Credits  Course#  Title 
.5  1040  Production Crew I  
3  1100  Beginning Acting  
3  1200  Introduction to Stage Design  
3  2010  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  
3  2020  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II 
.5  2040  Production Crew II 
3   2220  Stagecraft 
3  2800  Stage Lighting I  
3  3500  Playwriting/Screenwriting 
3  3730  Intermediate Acting 
3  3740  Acting Styles  
3  3790  Stage Management  
3  3810  Scenic Design  
3  3820  Stage Costuming I  
3  4500  Advanced Playwriting  
3  4820  Directing I  
3  4830  Directing II  
3  4930  Theatre History I  
3  4940  Theatre History II  
2  4990  Research in Theatre (Final Project)  
3     One 2000 level English Creative Writing Class (one of the following)  
   ENGL 2050   Creative Writing -- Introduction to Fiction  
   ENGL 2070  Creative Autobiographical Writing 
   ENGL 2080  Creative Writing -- Introduction to Poetry  

3     One 4000 level English creative Writing Class (one of the following)  
   ENGL 4050   Writer's Workshop: Fiction 
   ENGL 4050   Writer's Workshop: Autobiographical Writing 
   ENGL 4050   Writer's Workshop: Poetry  

Total required credits: 60 

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BFA THEATRE
Theatre/English Concentration

In addition to courses required for the BA in Theatre, students electing the BFA in Theatre/English must complete the following:

SIX HOURS (two courses) from the English 2000 level literature courses (ENGL 2425, 2430, or 2435) 
NINE HOURS (three courses) in any English 4000 level literature courses 
ENGL 4110 or 4120  
THEA 4830, Directing II 

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THEATRE EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT
 

NOTE:  The following are the Theatre Requirements for the Endorsement.  Additional requirements are determined within the Colege of Education and should be discussed with your advisor.

Credits  Course#  Title 
3  1000  Indtroduction to Theatre
3  1100  Beginning Acting  
3 1200 Introduction to Stage Design
3  2010  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I  
3  2020  Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II 
3   2220  Stagecraft 
3  4820 Directing I  
3  4830 Directing II  
3
2000
Creative Drama in the Classroom
    or
 
3  3650 Theatre for Young Audiences: Plays and Productions

 

 
OR

3

4600

Teaching Theatre Artists: Service Learning in the Community

Total Credit Hours 27   

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DANCE DEGREE PROGRAMS

BFA Dance Performance Concentration
In addition to the BA core courses, students electing the BFA Degree in Dance are expected to complete the following additional courses satisfactorily:
 
Credits  Course#  Title 
3  1100  Beginning Acting  
2  2160  Stage Makeup  
      OR 
3  2800  Stage Lighting  
      OR 
3  3820  Stage Costuming I  
1  2450  Tap II  
1  3020  Foundations of Teaching Dance  
1  3490  Jazz IV  
2  4001  Historical Dance  
1  4700  Auditioning and Careers in Dance  
1  4990  Research in Theatre: Senior Project 
      OR 
1  4990  Research in Theatre: Senior Thesis  
1-3  4990  Research in Theatre: Summer Study
    OR
1-3 A&S4990 Internship: Snowy Range Summer Dance Festival
As with the BA degree, the following courses outside the department are also required:
Credits Course# Title
4 BIOL 1010  General Biology*
2 HLED 1221  Standard First Aid & Personal Safety or current certification
4 ZOO 2040 Human Anatomy
* simultaneously fulfills University Studies requirement SB: Biological Sciences.
Total required credits: 71-74
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BFA Dance Science Concentration (DNS)

In addition to the BA core courses, students electing the BFA Degree in Dance are expected to complete the following courses satisfactorily:
Credits Course# Title
1 3020 Foundations of Teaching Dance
3 4990 Research Project/Capstone 1 credit -- independent study research methods 2 credits -- senior research project
The following courses outside the department are required:
Credits Course# Title
4 BIOL 1010  General Biology* * simultaneously fulfills University Studies requirement SB: Biological Sciences.
2 KIN 3050 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
4 ZOO 2040 Human Anatomy/Human Anatomy Lab
4 PSYCH 1000 General Psychology
2 FCSC 1140 Introduction to Nutrition
    OR
3 FCSC 1141 Principles of Nutrition
3 KIN 2030 Motor Learning
    OR
3 KIN 3034 Lifespan Motor Development
3 KIN 3037 Sports Psychology
    OR
3 KIN 3038 Exercise Psychology
Additional upper division required course work (minimum 6 hours from the following):
4 KIN 3021 Physiology of Exercise**
3 KIN 3040 Teaching Anatomy
3 3042 Biomechanics of Human Movement **
3 FCSC 3145 Sport Nutrition and Metabolism
3 FCSC 4147 Nutrition and Weight Control
3 PSYCH 3120 Cognitive Psychology**
3 PSYCH 3250 Health Psychology
3 PSYCH 4070 Motivation
**additional prerequisites required
Total required credits: 78
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MINOR IN THEATRE OR DANCE, REQUIRED COURSES

DANCE MINOR

Students electing to minor in Dance are expected to complete the following courses satisfactorily:
 
Credits Course# Title
.5 1040 Production Crew I
1 1410 Ballet I/I
1 1420 Ballet I/II
1 1430 Modern Dance I/I
1 1440 Modern Dance I/II 
1 1480 Beginning Jazz  
.5 2040 Production Crew II
3 2200 Backgrounds of Dance
1 3410 Classical Ballet III/I
1 3420 Classical Ballet III/II
1 3430 Modern Dance III/I
1 3440 Modern Dance III/II
2 4010 Advanced Ballet
2 4030 Advanced Modern Dance
2 4250 Beginning Dance Composition
4 4000 level Additional electives in Theatre & Dance at the 4000 level

Total Credit Hours 23

 

THEATRE MINOR
The following are the required courses for students electing to minor in Theatre.
 

Credits Course# Title
.5 1040 Production Crew I
3 1100 Beginning Acting
3 2010 Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama I
3 2020 Theatrical Backgrounds of Drama II
.5 2040 Production Crew II
3 2220 Stagecraft
3 2800 Stage Lighting I
3 2800 Stage Lighting I
    OR
3 3810 Scenic Design
    OR
3 3820 Stage Costuming I
3 Various Plus six (6) hours of electives in Theatre or Dance (3 hours must be at the 400 level)

Total Credit Hours 22
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SPECIAL COURSES

PRACTICUM COURSES

THEATRE 2050, Theatre Practice, is designed for both theatre and dance students who want credit for participation in performance or production with the University Theatre and Dance program.
A maximum of four hours may be earned by work in major University Theatre and Dance productions, student directed plays, student-choreographed concerts, and readers theatre. This could include design and technical work, acting, dancing, or a project in Kinesiology (for dance majors).
Students may register for the course to obtain credit earned in the previous semester in any of the above areas. No more than two credit hours may be earned in any semester.
Before a student registers for 2050, his project must be approved and the hours of credit determined by the faculty member who will act as supervisor.

THEATRE 4880, Advanced Theatre Practice, is designed for the junior or senior in either theatre or dance who has sufficient interest, experience, and background in some special area to develop a project under the supervision of a faculty member. Possible areas include technical theatre (costuming, lighting, makeup, design, scenery, sound), acting, directing, choreography, programs in interpretation, creative writing, creative dance workshops, and dance pedagogy for children and/or adults. The student may elect to design, create, develop, direct, undertake research, or may elect any combination of these approaches. Projects may utilize the studio theatre, main stage, or other suitable facilities as available.
Before a student registers for 4880, his project must be approved and the hours of credit determined by the faculty member who will act as supervisor. The supervisor and the student will determine format and content of a written report on the project.

THEATRE 4770 is a variable credit course for participants in the University of Wyoming Summer Theatre program. Enrollment and assignment of credit must be by permission of the faculty. Maximum credit per summer session: 3.

THEATRE 4710 Students who wish to preserve 4710 as a repeatable course within the curriculum but who also wish to participate in the Summer Theatre Company are permitted to utilize 4770 for this purpose if they so choose.

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SENIOR PROJECT

  • The Senior Project is intended to be an exercise in the practical application of production. The project may grow out of class work or be centered on a UW production, either main stage or studio. It may deal with scenic design, costume design, properties design, sound design, makeup design, technical direction, directing, dance pedagogy, or choreography. Students could choose an advisor appropriate to the subject matter. In consultation with the student, the advisor will decide if the chosen project is of sufficient scope to warrant Senior Project status. Additional faculty members may also serve on the student's project committee. For example, a project centered on a main stage production would require advisement from the director/choreographer and other designers.
  • Since the project is intended to be a "real" exercise in theatrical production, the normal production process will be followed when applicable. The following materials will be executed for all projects:
    • Scenic Design - ground plan, rendering or model, and working construction drawings.
    • Costume Design - costume renderings, fabric choice, pattern drafting, and costume plot.
    • Design Assistance - students choosing this avenue will work in close association with the scenic or costume designer for a main stage production. Although another person's design concept will be followed, the materials listed above will still be required.
    • Lighting Design - light plot, section, and hook-up sheets .
    • Properties Design - prop renderings, working construction drawings, and prop construction Sound Design - finished tape 
    • Makeup Design - character sketches, makeup charts, and execution of designs 
    • Technical Direction- work schedules, materials lists and costs, shop supervision, and daily journal of work completed.
    • Directing - performance of completed work and prompt book.
    • Choreography - performance of completed work and notebook explaining approach and intention.
    • Pedagogy - development of lesson plans & their implementation 
  • The faculty in the Department of Theatre and Dance must approve all Senior Projects. Approval is dependent upon the quality of the proposal, the qualifications of the applicant, available resources, and the department's production schedule. Projects will be considered for the Studio Theatre as well as the main stage.
  • Prerequisites:
    • Students in all areas must have senior standing.T
    • Technical/Design areas - successful completion of THEA 2160, THEA 2800, THEA 3810, THEA 4820, and THEA 3820
    • Directing - successful completion of THEA 2160, THEA 2800, THEA 3810, THEA 4820, and THEA 3820
    • Choreography - successful completion of THEA 4250 and THEA 4260
  • Deadlines
    • Students should start investigating opportunities for their senior project in the last term of their Junior Year. Students must select their Senior Project advisor prior to pre-registration for the semester in which they enroll for Senior Project. DUE February of spring semester of Junior year.
    • The Senior Project must be completed no later than three weeks prior to "Study Day" for the semester in which they are enrolled for Senior Project except in those cases when the project is centered around a production that runs beyond that date. In those cases, the project must be completed by the date that the production opens. 
  • All members of the faculty will respond to the Senior Project. However, the grade for the Senior Project will be assigned by the faculty advisor(s). Satisfactory completion of the Senior Project is a "C" or better.
  • Senior Project may be used for Senior Honors Project. All of the above conditions apply with the addition of the following:
    • The honors advisor will assign the grade. Satisfactory is defined as "A".
    • Honors students will make an oral presentation before at least 3 faculty members chosen by the student in consultation with his/her advisor. It shall include the student's Senior Project advisor. All members of the committee must agree that the student's oral presentation is satisfactory.
    • Although the Senior Project may relate to the Senior Thesis, the Senior Project is not acceptable as a substitute for the thesis.

ANY STUDENT HAVING QUESTIONS ABOUT SENIOR PROJECT, HONORS PROJECT, OR SENIOR THESIS SHOULD SEE THEIR ADVISOR.

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  SENIOR THESIS:  Theatre 4950
The Senior Thesis is intended to be an exercise in research and writing. The thesis project may grow out of class work or students work in production. It may deal with research in dramatic literature, history, scenography, or some aspect of performance. Students should choose an advisor appropriate to the subject matter.
The student will select a thesis adviser. Also, in consultation with the student, the thesis advisor will select two additional faculty members for the student's thesis committee.
Normally the Senior Thesis will run 15 to 20 pages.
The MLA Style Sheet will be followed as a guideline.
Prerequisites:
a.     Students must have successfully completed English 1010 and English 1020 prior to enrolling for Senior Thesis.
b.     Theatre students must have completed THEA 4930 Theatre History and its prerequisites before enrolling in Senior Thesis. Dance students must have completed THEA 4200 20th Century Dance and its prerequisites before enrolling in Senior Thesis.
c.     Student must have senior standing.
6.     Deadlines:
a.     Normally, students will have selected their Senior Thesis advisor prior to registration for the semester in which they enroll for Senior Thesis.
b.     The Senior Thesis must be completed no later than three weeks prior to "Study Day" in order to allow time for faculty members to read and respond to the thesis prior to graduation. A copy of the Thesis must be provided for each of the committee members.
c.     Once the Committee has read the Thesis, the student will meet with the committee in a formal setting to discuss the merits of his/her work.
7.     Evaluation:
a.     The student's grade will be assigned solely by the faculty advisor. However, if two faculty members find the thesis unsatisfactory, the student must revise it to make it acceptable to all members of the committee. Faculty members objecting to passing the thesis must state their objections in writing no later than one week prior to the end of classes.
8.     Senior Thesis may be used for the Senior Honors Project. All of the above conditions apply in addition to the following:
a.     The honors advisor will assign the grade. Satisfactory shall be defined as "A".
b.     Honors students will make an oral presentation before at least three faculty members chosen by the student in consultation with his/her advisor. It shall include the student's thesis advisor. All members of the committee must agree that the student's oral presentation is satisfactory.

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